If you are experiencing problems completing your transaction, please email us at [email protected] for assistance.

Now Showing

This multi-award-winning stage production of Noël Coward's provocative comedy featuring Andrew Scott (theater's "Vanya," ALL OF US STRANGERS, TV's FLEABAG) returns to the big screen. While Scott's character, star actor Garry Essendine, prepares to embark on an overseas tour, he finds his colorful life in danger of spiraling out of control. Engulfed by an escalating identity crisis as his many and various relationships compete for his attention, Garry spends his few remaining days at home in a chaotic whirlwind of love, sex, panic and soul-searching. Filmed live from The Old Vic in London during a sold-out run in 2019, this revival directed by Matthew Warchus ("Matilda: The Musical") is a giddy, surprisingly modern reflection on fame, desire and loneliness. DIR Matthew Warchus; SCR Noël Coward; PROD Anke Lueddecke. UK, 2024, color, 180 min. NOT RATED (treat as PG-13)

No Passes accepted.

1776 is a musical celebration of the founding of the United States of America based on the award-winning Broadway production. The story centers around familiar historical characters as they organize a movement for independence from Mother England: the tough and unyielding John Adams (William Daniels); the charming and pragmatic Benjamin Franklin (Howard Da Silva); the brilliant Thomas Jefferson (Ken Howard), who is chosen to write the Declaration of Independence even as he longs for the company of his new bride, Martha (Blythe Danner); and the rest of the Continental Congress. All events lead up to that most significant date of July 4, 1776, when the Declaration was signed. Mastered in 4K, the fully restored director's cut of 1776 looks and sounds better than ever. Nominee, Best Cinematography, 1973 Academy Awards®. DIR Peter H. Hunt; SCR Peter Stone, based on the play by Stone and Sherman Edwards; PROD Jack L. Warner. U.S., 1972, color, 165 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

With this movie, director Stanley Kubrick redefined the limits of filmmaking and cemented his legacy as one of the most revolutionary and influential directors of all time. Originally released in 70mm Cinerama roadshow format following the film's world premiere on April 2, 1968, at the Uptown Theater in Washington, DC, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY ignited the imaginations of critics and audiences alike, and its impact continues to resonate to this day. Kubrick's dazzling, Academy Award®–winning achievement is a compelling drama of man vs. machine, a stunning meld of music and motion. Kubrick (who co-wrote the screenplay with sci-fi author Arthur C. Clarke) first visits man's prehistoric ape-ancestry past, then leaps millennia into colonized space and ultimately whisks astronaut David Bowman (Keir Dullea) into uncharted territory, perhaps even into immortality. "Open the pod bay doors, HAL." Let an awesome journey unlike any other begin. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Arthur C. Clarke, from his story "The Sentinel." UK/U.S., 1968, color, 142 min. plus one 15-min. intermission. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

About "Kubrick: An Odyssey"
The enigmatic and elusive creator of 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, THE SHINING and A CLOCKWORK ORANGE has not been treated to a full-length biography in over 20 years. "Kubrick: An Odyssey" fills that gap. Robert P. Kolker and Nathan Abrams' definitive book (published February 2024 by Pegasus Books) is based on access to the latest research, especially Stanley Kubrick's archive at the University of the Arts, London, as well as other private papers plus new interviews with family members and those who worked with him. It presents the most in-depth portrait yet of the groundbreaking director, offering comprehensive and in-depth coverage of Kubrick's personal, private, public and working life. "Kubrick: An Odyssey" investigates not only the making of his films but also about those he wanted (but failed) to make like BURNING SECRET, NAPOLEON, ARYAN PAPERS and A.I. Revealingly, this immersive biography punctures the controversial myths about the reclusive filmmaker who created some of the most important works of art of the 20th century.

About Robert P. Kolker
Robert P. Kolker, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland, taught cinema studies for almost 50 years. He is the author of "A Cinema of Loneliness" and "The Extraordinary Image: Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and the Reimagining of Cinema"; editor of "Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey: New Essays" and "The Oxford Handbook of Film and Media Studies"; and co-author of "Eyes Wide Shut: Stanley Kubrick and the Making of His Final Film."

Academy Award® winners Clark Gable, Norma Shearer and Lionel Barrymore star with Leslie Howard in the romantic drama about a woman who is loved by two men but chooses the wrong one. Stephen Ashe (Barrymore) is a brilliant criminal defense lawyer with an alcohol problem and a daughter, Jan (Shearer), who is perhaps too independent. After Ashe brings home his latest client, gangster Ace Wilfong (Gable), Jan becomes entranced by Ace's overtures but soon regrets succumbing to them. Jan's spurned fiancé, Dwight Winthrop (Howard), comes to her rescue — by killing Ace. Will Ashe's legal skills be enough to save Dwight's life? Lionel Barrymore won the Academy Award® for Best Actor in a Leading Role, and nominations were also earned for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Shearer) and Best Director. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR/PROD Clarence Brown; SCR Becky Gardiner, from the novel by Adela Rogers St. Johns. U.S., 1931, b&w, 91 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Chaos ensues as the Marx Brothers take on the task of helping lowly chorus singer Ricardo Baroni (Allan Jones) romance leading-lady Rosa (Kitty Carlisle). As Chico sells peanuts in the aisles and the orchestra breaks into "Take Me Out to the Ball Game," the boys manage to wreck a production of "Il Trovatore" by the splenetic impresario Herman Gottlieb (Sig Rumann). DIR Sam Wood; SCR George S. Kaufman, Morrie Ryskind, from a story by James Kevin McGuinness; PROD Irving Thalberg. U.S., 1935, b&w, 93 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Manhattan Assistant DA (Spencer Tracy) is pitted in court against his spouse (Katharine Hepburn), defender of husband-shooting housewife, played by Judy Holliday, whose single-shot five-minute deposition proves a comedic tour de force. Holliday filmed during the day while appearing on Broadway at night in BORN YESTERDAY. And Hepburn persuaded Cukor to focus only on Holliday during their scene together. DIR George Cukor; SCR Ruth Gordon, Garson Kanin; PROD Lawrence Weingarten. U.S.,1949, b&w, 101 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

The preternaturally gifted director and choreographer Bob Fosse turned the camera on his own life for this madly imaginative, self-excoriating musical masterpiece. Roy Scheider gives the performance of his career as Joe Gideon, whose exhausting work schedule — mounting a Broadway production by day and editing his latest movie by night — and routine of amphetamines, booze and sex are putting his health at serious risk. Fosse burrows into Gideon's (and his own) mind, rendering his interior world as phantasmagoric spectacle. Assembled with visionary editing that makes dance come alive on-screen as never before and overflowing with sublime footwork by the likes of Ann Reinking, Leland Palmer and Ben Vereen, ALL THAT JAZZ pushes the musical genre to personal depths and virtuosic aesthetic heights. (Note courtesy of The Criterion Collection.) DIR/SCR Bob Fosse; SCR/PROD Robert Alan Aurthur. U.S., 1979, color, 123 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

An oddball group of four people (made up of two hospital employees, a gymnast and her coach) form a secret society that sets out to ease the grieving process for those whose loved ones have died. For a fee, they will act the part of the missing family member, learning their hobbies and eccentricities in order to help the customer accept their loss. As methadone is to heroin addiction, so are the Alps, as they call themselves, to the mourning process. But when the nurse known as Monte Rosa (Aggeliki Papoulia, also in DOGTOOTH) begins to attach too deeply to her subjects, their project spirals out of control into violence and confusion. Winner of the Best Screenplay Award at the Venice Film Festival, ALPS is a mysterious and moving investigation into the process of mourning by one of the most talented and provocative filmmakers working today. (Note adapted from Kino Lorber.) DIR/SCR/PROD Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Efthimis Filippou; PROD Athina Rachel Tsangari. Greece, 2011, color, 93 min. In Greek with English subtitles. NOT RATED

Preceded by:
NIMIC
Yorgos Lanthimos distills his oeuvre's themes and affectations — fish-eye lenses, existential terror, tragicomedy — into this 12-minute short in which a cellist (Matt Dillon) finds his life taking the oddest turn after a chance encounter with a stranger on the subway (Daphne Patakia). DIR/SCR Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Efthimis Filippou; PROD Rebecca Boswell, Polly Kemp, Adam Saward. U.S./UK/Germany, 2019, color, 12 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

A starving artist (Gene Kelly) shares a Parisian garret with an unemployed pianist (Oscar Levant), and when an heiress and patroness (Nina Foch) takes an interest in Kelly and his canvases, it could be their ticket to the big time. But Kelly has fallen hard for a shopgirl (Leslie Caron). This multiple Oscar® winner — six in all, including Best Picture — features a beautiful George Gershwin score, including "I Got Rhythm," "Love Is Here to Stay," and an extended ballet finale inspired by Impressionist paintings: "Eighteen minutes of screen magic, unsurpassed in the boldness of its design and the dazzle of its execution." – Clive Hirschhorn, "The Hollywood Musical." DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR Alan Jay Lerner; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1951, color, 113 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Asked to crack a hieroglyphic code, American-at-Oxford professor David Pollock (Gregory Peck) becomes embroiled, along with a mystery woman (Sophia Loren) and a shipping magnate (Alan Badel), in a plot to assassinate a Middle Eastern politician. Stanley Donen's follow-up to CHARADE is a treasure trove of high 1960s style, from Loren's fabulous Dior couture and art director Reece Pemberton's mod décor to Christopher Challis' psychedelic op-art photography and Henry Mancini's score. DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Julian Mitchell, Stanley Price, Peter Stone, from the novel "The Cypher" by Gordon Cotler. U.S., 1966, color, 105 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This hard-hitting drama follows a company of war-weary World War II infantrymen trapped behind German lines during the Battle of the Bulge. Homesick and shivering in snow-covered foxholes, the soldiers endure misery, agony and grief with irrepressible humor and dauntless mockery. Van Johnson, James Whitmore (who received an Oscar® nomination for his performance), Ricardo Montalban and George Murphy star in this remarkable war film about courageous American G.I.s caught up in the battle at Bastogne. None intends to be a hero, but each rises to the heroism demanded of him. Nominated for six Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, BATTLEGROUND picked up Oscars® for Best Screenplay and Best Cinematography. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR William A. Wellman; SCR/PROD Robert Pirosh; PROD Dore Schary. U.S., 1949, b&w, 118 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

The top-grossing film of 1984 is an exhilarating action-comedy that crowned Eddie Murphy as an A-list star and box-office champ — one who is still going strong four decades later with the franchise's fourth installment BEVERLY HILLS COP: AXEL F coming in July. Maverick cop Axel Foley (Murphy) leaves frigid Detroit for balmy Beverly Hills to investigate the mysterious death of a childhood friend. Foley's nosing around, plus his rusting Chevy Nova and wild style, don't endear him to the citizens of the tony suburb. But Foley's charm, guile and crime-solving street smarts inspire bored detectives Rosewood (Judge Reinhold) and Taggart (John Ashton) to join forces with him and crack the case. The soundtrack's synth instrumental "Axel F," by Giorgio Moroder protégé Harold Faltermeyer, became a chart-topping, decade-defining hit. DIR Martin Brest; SCR Daniel Petrie Jr.; PROD Jerry Bruckheimer, Don Simpson. U.S., 1984, color, 105 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

After a decade of grieving the death of her young husband, Sean, Anna (Nicole Kidman) is ready to move on and marry her boyfriend (Danny Huston). Then a mysterious boy arrives, also named Sean (Cameron Bright), claiming to be the reincarnation of her dead husband — and he knows things only Sean could know. Kidman is riveting in this mind-bending, emotional thriller, which memorably features a bravura slow zoom and sustained close-up on her face — and into her psyche — as she hears the Prelude to Act 1 (aka "The Gathering Storm") from Wagner's "Die Walküre." The enchanting score by Alexandre Desplat also takes cues from Wagner. DIR/SCR Jonathan Glazer; SCR Milo Addica, Jean-Claude Carrière; PROD Lizie Gower, Nick Morris, Jean-Louis Piel. U.S./UK/Germany/France, 2004, color, 100 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Perhaps the most iconic "art film" of the 1960s, BLOW-UP uses the plot thread of a murder mystery to present questions about art itself, and the artist's willingness, even eagerness, to distort reality and perception. Director Michelangelo Antonioni presents a day in the life of a successful but ennui-ridden London fashion photographer (David Hemmings) who, after surreptitiously taking candid shots of lovers in the park, realizes he may have captured evidence of a murder. (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR/SCR Michelangelo Antonioni; SCR Tonino Guerra; PROD Carlo Ponti. UK/Italy/U.S., 1966, color, 111 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Documentary filmmaker Bob (Robert Culp) and wife Carol (Natalie Wood) return from a secluded group therapy retreat in Los Angeles that modernizes their perspectives on sexual behavior. Naturally, they share their newly learned wisdom with neighbors Ted (Elliott Gould) and Alice (Dyan Cannon) and ask the million-dollar question: wanna swap partners? This 1968 comedy from Paul Mazursky explores the changing mores of the '60s through a foursome willing to tread new waters but still bogged down by the conventional values of their upbringing. DIR/SCR Paul Mazursky; SCR/PROD Larry Tucker. U.S., 1969, color, 105 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Brian De Palma works a wicked variation on Hitchcockian elements from REAR WINDOW and VERTIGO (among others), when Hollywood hanger-on Jake Scully (Craig Wasson) witnesses by telescope the brutal murder of a gorgeous dancer/exhibitionist (Melanie Griffith) in the apartment across the way. As ever in Hollywood, appearances can be deceiving, and Jake soon discovers he’s the patsy in an even more complicated murder case involving players from both of L.A.'s major film industries: Hollywood and porn. DIR/SCR/PROD Brian De Palma; SCR Robert J. Avrech. U.S., 1984, color, 114 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"The unsung prototype of the screwball comedy and one of the funniest inside-Hollywood movies ever." – Michael Sragow. A Hollywood star (Jean Harlow) is surrounded by a personal entourage of hangers-on and deadbeat relations; her manic publicist (Lee Tracy) keeps making up crazy stories for the press; and if would-be paramour (Franchot Tone) seems too good to be true, he probably is. Although this pre-Code gem had some real-life resonance with Harlow's own personal story, the film was inspired by the silent era's great sex symbol – and director Victor Fleming's former fiancée – Clara Bow, with Harlow's nickname here, "The If Girl," a wink at Bow's famous sobriquet, "The It Girl." DIR/PROD Victor Fleming; SCR Jules Furthman, John Lee Mahin, from the play by Mack Crane and Caroline Francke; PROD Hunt Stromberg. U.S., 1933, b&w, 96 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Featuring an all-Black cast — for the first time in a Hollywood production since 1936's THE GREEN PASTURES — CABIN IN THE SKY tells the vibrant fable of Little Joe Jackson (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson), who is torn between the love of his good wife Petunia (Ethel Waters) and the wiles of good-time bad-girl Georgia Brown (Lena Horne) while caught in a tug-of-war between emissaries from the Lord and Satan. The feature debut of Vincente Minnelli (AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, GIGI) is a musical treasure with a soundtrack of dazzling standards, including "Taking a Chance on Love" and "Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe." (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR Joseph Schrank, from the play by Lynn Root; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1943, b&w, 98 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

For many, this is the movie about the gambling life. Two men who share a passion for it (Elliott Gould and George Segal) become fast friends after meeting at a low-stakes California poker parlor. They go on a spree that takes them to Vegas and a shot at a big-money game. By turns funny and poignant, CALIFORNIA SPLIT captures the highs of risk and reward, and its attendant manias, with Gould and Segal at the top of their games as the gambling buddies. DIR/PROD Robert Altman; SCR/PROD Joseph Walsh. U.S., 1974, color, 108 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Feline fanatics, join us for the paw-some 2024 edition of CatVideoFest! Curated and edited by award-winning, Seattle-based filmmaker Will Braden (HENRI, LE CHAT NOIR), CatVideoFest is a compilation of the latest and greatest cat videos culled from countless hours of unique submissions and sourced animations, music videos and classic internet powerhouses. CatVideoFest is a joyous communal experience, only available in theaters. Enjoy 70-plus minutes of nonstop cuteness, bond with your fellow feline fanatics and learn more about how to help cats in need in DC and beyond. DIR various; PROD Will Braden. U.S., 2024, color, 73 min. In English and Feline. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Co-presented with the Humane Rescue Alliance.

CHARADE was a critical and box-office smash for Stanley Donen, seamlessly mixing romantic comedy with a thriller. Back in Paris after a skiing holiday, an interpreter (Audrey Hepburn) finds herself newly widowed, apartment-less and the target of thieves, including a hook-handed George Kennedy and a Southern-accented James Coburn — and then, everyone, including a solicitously helpful stranger played by Cary Grant, starts switching identities! In their only pairing, Grant and Hepburn redefine charm and sophistication amid witty remarks, frantic chases and the most romantic boat ride in history. DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Peter Stone. U.S., 1963, color, 113 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

After the success of 1975's JAWS, Steven Spielberg wanted to film a smaller-scale story about a man obsessed with an alien encounter. Opting to go with special effects, the project grew enormously complicated, but ultimately resulted in another major success. Roy Neary (Richard Dreyfuss) witnesses a UFO on an abandoned road and, against the wishes of his wife (Teri Garr), goes searching for answers. François Truffaut plays a French UFO specialist who leads the effort to communicate with the aliens. John Williams' Oscar®-nominated score, featuring the "five-tone" motif now ingrained in popular culture, lost that Oscar® to his own score for STAR WARS (but later won two Grammys®). DIR/SCR Steven Spielberg; PROD Julia Phillips, Michael Phillips. U.S., 1977, color, 137 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Soviet streetcar conductor Theodore (Hedy Lamarr) is as lovely as a Botticelli angel and as forbidding as a Moscow winter. American reporter McKinley B. "Mac" Thompson is as hunky and self-confident as Clark Gable (who happens to play the role). In pre–World War II Russia, the two share a comedy-and-action-filled adventure involving secret identities, a marriage of convenience, hairbreadth escapes and a thrilling tank-chase finale as Mac tries to help Theodore get into the U.S. one step ahead of the corrupt secret police. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR/PROD King Vidor; SCR Ben Hecht, Charles Lederer; PROD Gottfried Reinhardt. U.S., 1940, b&w, 90 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[KAIJŪ SŌ-SHINGEKI] [怪獣総進撃]
The original Godzilla team of director Ishiro Honda, special-effects supervisor Eiji Tsuburaya and composer Akira Ifukube reunited for this kaiju extravaganza, which features no fewer than 11 monsters. Set in the remote future of 1999, when the people of Earth have achieved world peace by confining destructive creatures to Monsterland (until an alien race intervenes), DESTROY ALL MONSTERS mounts a thrilling display of innovative action sequences and memorable images that have made it a favorite for generations of viewers. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Ishirō Honda; SCR Kaoru Mabuchi; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1968, color, 89 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

As a rookie cop, LAPD detective Erin Bell (Nicole Kidman) was placed undercover with a gang in the California desert with tragic results. When the gang leader (Toby Kebbell) re-emerges 17 years later, Bell must work her way back through the remaining members and into her own history with them to finally reckon with the demons that destroyed her past. A moral and existential odyssey, DESTROYER features one of Kidman's most startling roles, not just because of the transformative makeup that replaces her glamorous, blonde-haired visage with a pallid, battered veneer but because you'd never expect her to play such a grim, morally decayed cop. She embodies a scarred soul who's been to hell and back and does so through the easily missed aspects of her performance: a gait weighed by years of abuse, her eyes brimming with visceral hatred. You may not like who Kidman is playing, but there's no doubt you'll be captivated by her performance in this dark, gritty thriller. DIR Karyn Kusama; SCR/PROD Phil Hay, Matt Manfredi; PROD Fred Berger. U.S., 2018, color, 123 min. RATED R

AFI Memeber passes accepted.

An old-money, debt-ridden New York couple (Lionel Barrymore and Billie Burke) host a dinner whose guests include a nouveau riche businessman (Wallace Beery; "He smells Oklahoma!") and his crass wife (Jean Harlow; "I'm gonna be a lady if it kills me!"). The cast also features John Barrymore as a fading matinee idol and Marie Dressler as an indomitable one, plus Lee Tracy, Jean Hersholt and May Robson. George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber's Depression-era farce of changing fortunes was ushered from stage to screen by celebrated scriptwriters Frances Marion and Herman J. Mankiewicz; the famous closing zinger is thought to be the contribution of an uncredited Donald Ogden Stewart. DIR George Cukor; SCR Herman J. Mankiewicz, Frances Marion, from the play by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman; PROD David O. Selznick. U.S., 1933, b&w, 111 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ten nominations and five Oscar® wins for David Lean's adaptation of the Boris Pasternak classic recounting the time before, during and after the Russian Revolution, as experienced by the soulful doctor/poet of the title (Omar Sharif) and recounted later by his Soviet army officer half-brother (Alec Guinness). Zhivago navigates a difficult love triangle between his aristocratic wife (Geraldine Chaplin) and new love (Julie Christie), a nurse who has suffered heartbreak as the former lover of a self-righteous revolutionary (Tom Courtenay) and dishonor at the hands of a politician/rapist (Rod Steiger). DIR David Lean; SCR Robert Bolt, from the novel by Boris Pasternak; PROD Carlo Ponti. UK, 1965, color, 212 min. including 15 min. intermission. In English and Russian with English subtitles. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

On the run from mobsters during the Depression, Grace (a spectacular Nicole Kidman) finds herself in the small Rocky Mountain town of Dogville. Amiably taken in by the town's residents, she quickly finds herself at their mercy as their duplicitous nature comes to light and she is asked to repay their kindness in turn. A polarizing film, DOGVILLE presents the Dogme 95 aesthetic that director Lars von Trier co-founded but with a Brechtian bent: its staging is a minimalist set whose spartan design focuses our attention on the nuanced performances from a stacked cast that also includes John Hurt, Lauren Bacall, Paul Bettany, Chloë Sevigny, Stellan Skarsgård, Ben Gazzara, James Caan, Patricia Clarkson and Udo Kier. The first in the director's yet unfinished USA – LAND OF OPPORTUNITIES trilogy, DOGVILLE is a challenging yet profoundly significant work from an uncompromising artist. DIR/SCR Lars von Trier; PROD Vibeke Windeløv. Denmark/UK/Sweden/France/Germany, 2003, color, 178 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

After his longtime dance partner (Ann Miller) leaves to go solo ("Shakin' the Blues Away"), a jilted Broadway star (Fred Astaire) drunkenly boasts that he can turn any plain Jane into a first-class dancer, and to prove it, he sets his sights on the next dancer he sees: a naïve chorus girl played by Judy Garland. Astaire and Garland's only screen pairing is this Oscar®-winning Irving Berlin musical featuring music and dance highlights "Steppin' Out with My Baby," "A Couple of Swells," "Beautiful Faces Need Beautiful Clothes" and "It Only Happens When I Dance with You." Astaire's typically dazzling footwork gets a fresh look, including slo-mos and layered dissolves, from cinematographer Harry Stradling and editor Albert Akst. DIR Charles Walters; SCR Sidney Sheldon, Frances Goodrich, Albert Hackett; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1948, color, 107 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"This used to be a helluva good country. I can't understand what's going wrong with it." Football-helmeted good ol' boy George Hanson (Jack Nicholson) provides something like a conscience to Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper's counterculture outlaw biker tale, the zeitgeisty smash hit that put New Hollywood on the map and made Nicholson a star. Nicholson was considering giving up acting when executive producer Bert Schneider asked him to replace Rip Torn in his pals Fonda and Hopper's low-budget biker movie. Laszlo Kovacs' adventurous cinematography and the Steppenwolf/The Byrds/Jimi Hendrix–heavy soundtrack set the tone, for both the film and an era. DIR/SCR Dennis Hopper; SCR/PROD Peter Fonda; SCR Terry Southern. U.S., 1969, color, 95 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Laura Mars (Faye Dunaway) is a fashion photographer whose photos bear a striking and unsettling similarity to actual crime scenes. Her work catches the attention of Detective John Neville (Tommy Lee Jones), who is suspicious of Mars' "inspiration." When models and acquaintances of Laura are murdered, the question of her involvement becomes more serious and disturbing. This American-style giallo features a screenplay co-written by horror mastermind John Carpenter. (Note adapted from Sony Pictures Releasing.) DIR Irvin Kershner; SCR John Carpenter, David Zelag Goodman; PROD Jon Peters. U.S., 1978, color, 104 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Three years in the making, this cinematic treatise on the toll adultery (even imagined) can take on a marriage turned out to be director Stanley Kubrick's final film. The story confronts the sexual dysfunction of Dr. William Harford (Tom Cruise), who embarks on a bizarre erotic odyssey through nocturnal 1990s New York City in the wake of his wife (Nicole Kidman) confessing to near-infidelity years before. Arguably the most divisive film in Kubrick's much-celebrated oeuvre, EYES WIDE SHUT has only grown in stature and repute in the 25 years since its original release and is an essential component of the late director's filmography. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Frederic Raphael, inspired by the novella "Traumnovelle" by Arthur Schnitzler. UK, 1999, color, 159 min. Rated R

AFI Memeber passes accepted.

Seven classes a day and a hot lunch. That's what New York City's High School for the Performing Arts guarantees. Stardom? That's something the school's teenage musicians, actors, dancers and dreamers strive for. FAME sings the body electric, celebrating the growing-up process of honing talent, confronting realities, finding love and living life. Director Alan Parker (EVITA, THE COMMITMENTS) brings an energetic style to the crisscrossing stories of students (including those played by future Academy Award® winner Irene Cara, Paul McCrane, Barry Miller and two actors who returned for the TV series: Gene Anthony Ray and Lee Curreri). Nominated for six Oscars®, FAME won for its dynamic score and title tune. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR Alan Parker; SCR Christopher Gore; PROD David De Silva, Alan Marshall. U.S., 1980, color, 134 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Stacy Keach and Jeff Bridges anchor former amateur lightweight John Huston's unsentimental and fiercely underrated adaptation of Leonard Gardner’s novel about two boxers — one past his prime, the other just a teen — slugging their way through a down-and-out amateur boxing circuit for chump change. The iconoclastic Susan Tyrell's portrayal of a feisty barfly earned her a Best Supporting Actress nomination. DIR/PROD John Huston; SCR Leonard Gardner, based on his novel; PROD Ray Stark. U.S., 1972, color, 100 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Jack Nicholson gives a career-making performance as Bobby Dupea, a young man from a well-to-do family on the run from his roots and perhaps his future. A former piano prodigy, he's been biding his time in California with his ne'er-do-well friends, but when he learns his father is ill, he packs up his pregnant girlfriend (Karen Black) and hits the road to the family's home in Washington State. A series of misadventures, including an impromptu piano performance on the back of a moving truck, some far-out hitchhikers and the famous chicken salad scene at a roadside diner, give way to a serious reckoning between Nicholson and his family once home. Nominated for four Oscars®: Best Picture, Actor (Nicholson), Supporting Actress (Black) and Screenplay. DIR/PROD Bob Rafelson; SCR Carole Eastman; PROD Richard Wechsler. U.S., 1970, color, 98 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"We accept you, one of us! Gooble Gobble!" After practically inventing horror cinema with 1931's DRACULA, Tod Browning returned to MGM for this controversial, transgressive circus picture. Among a tight-knit coterie of sideshow performers, beautiful trapeze artist Cleopatra has her eyes set on Hans, a performer with dwarfism sitting on a large inheritance. With the aid of her strongman lover, Hercules, she attempts to marry and then poison Hans. But when her plot is uncovered, Cleopatra must face the wrath of the misfits and outcasts she has crossed. Misconstrued as an exploitative grotesquerie upon its release, FREAKS was not only a box-office disaster, but it tanked Browning's career. A reappraisal on the cult circuit in the 1960s resulted in the film finally being recognized for its expressionist visuals and Browning's bold compassion for his characters. DIR/PROD Tod Browning; SCR Willis Goldbeck, Leon Gordon, from the story "Spurs" by Tod Robbins. U.S., 1932, b&w, 64 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Greenwich Village bookworm Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn) is whisked off to Paris and turned into a top model by fashion magazine editor Maggie Prescott (Kay Thompson) and photographer Dick Avery (Fred Astaire). Director Stanley Donen inventively mounts the musical numbers, including Thompson's brassy credo "Think Pink!"; Astaire's title song, sung to his model's developing image in his darkroom; and Hepburn's touching "How Long Has This Been Going On?" The famous photo-shoot montage, with a Givenchy-adorned Hepburn posing against Paris landmarks, sparkles with color and wit. DIR Stanley Donen; SCR Leonard Gershe; PROD Roger Edens. U.S., 1957, color, 103 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Shall We Dance?: The Films of Fred Astaire.

AFI Member passes accepted.

German emigré Fritz Lang's first American film is a scathing depiction of mob violence and blind justice easily led astray. Passing through a small town, Joe Wilson (Spencer Tracy, in a powerful performance) is arrested, based on flimsy circumstantial evidence, for the kidnapping of a child. Word spreads quickly while Joe is in jail awaiting arraignment, and soon an angry mob demands the sheriff turn him over for a lynching; rebuffed, they burn down the building. Now, 20-plus citizens are on trial for Joe's murder. But his fiancée (Sylvia Sidney) suspects Joe might have escaped the blaze. DIR/SCR Fritz Lang; SCR Bartlett Cormack, from a story by Norman Krasna; PROD Joseph L. Mankiewicz. U.S., 1936, b&w, 92 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In the throes of the Great Depression, glad-handing politician Judson Hammond (Walter Huston) is elected president. Indifferent to the country's suffering, he changes his tune when he survives a deadly car crash. Awakening with a fire in his belly, he decides to take matters into his own hands and consolidate power with the President, abolishing Congress and a contentious Constitution along the way. A fantasy of a benevolent dictatorship funded by William Randolph Hearst (who inspired the titular newspaper baron in CITIZEN KANE), the film was a direct message to actual American president Franklin D. Roosevelt as a possible solution to the Great Depression. DIR Gregory La Cava; SCR Carey Wilson, from the novel by T.F. Tweed; PROD William Randolph Hearst, Walter Wanger. U.S., 1933, b&w, 86 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"You're a big man, but you're in bad shape. With me, it's a full-time job. Now behave yourself." Michael Caine's existential hard man Jack Carter is Gangster Number One in this hugely influential, neo-noir classic from talented writer/director Mike Hodges. Traveling up from London to Newcastle after his brother's mysterious death, Carter begins kicking ass and taking names in his search for the killer, uncovering layer upon layer of underworld betrayal, double-dealing and secret sleaze. Caine is magnificent as the antihero — arguably the finest performance of his 70-year career. The minimalist, groovy, uniquely atmospheric score is by Roy Budd. DIR/SCR Mike Hodges, based on the novel "Jack's Return Home" by Ted Lewis; PROD Michael Klinger. UK, 1971, color, 112 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[SAN DAIKAIJŪ CHIKYŪ SAIDAI NO KESSEN] [三大怪獣 地球最大の決戦]
After laying waste to an alien civilization on Venus, the three-headed, lightning-emitting space monster Ghidorah brings its insatiable thirst for destruction to Earth, where fierce foes Godzilla, Rodan and Mothra must join forces to deal with the unprecedented threat. An electrifying screen debut for Godzilla's archenemy Ghidorah, this film also marks a turning point for the series, as the first time the King of the Monsters acts to protect the planet. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR Ishirō Honda; SCR Shin'ichi Sekizawa; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1964, color, 93 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Put together a gloomy New England house, a dark night and four of America's legendary leading men, and you have all the ingredients for a spellbinding motion picture based on a bestseller by Peter Straub. Co-starring Patricia Neal, GHOST STORY is about the members of the Chowder Society (played by Fred Astaire, Melvyn Douglas, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and John Houseman), who get together each week to share tales of horror. Soon, however, a secret terror invades the group, and one by one, they die mysteriously because of a real-life ghost story that is part of their past. (Note courtesy of Universal Pictures.) DIR John Irvin; SCR Lawrence D. Cohen, from the novel by Peter Straub; PROD Burt Weissbourd. U.S.,1981, color, 110 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

If there's something strange in the neighborhood, who you gonna call? A team of scientists battles the supernatural as wise-cracking ghost-catchers-for-hire in New York City. When released in 1984, GHOSTBUSTERS became a record-setting box-office smash hit and established the template for how to blend special effects with comedy to create imaginatively escapist adventure. In a fortuitous convergence of then-red-hot comic talent, director/producer Ivan Reitman sure-handedly guides actors/writers Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd's script, a winning vehicle for top-billed Bill Murray, while supporting players Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver, Annie Potts and Rick Moranis all contribute memorable moments of hilarity. DIR/PROD Ivan Reitman; SCR Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis. U.S., 1984, color, 105 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

GODZILLA, MOTHRA AND KING GHIDORAH: GIANT MONSTERS ALL-OUT ATTACK [GOJIRA, MOSURA, KINGU GIDORÂ: DAIKAIJŪ SŌKŌGEKI] [ゴジラ・モスラ・キングギドラ 大怪獣総攻撃]
The vengeful spirits of those killed in the Pacific by the Imperial Japanese Army possess Godzilla and lay waste to the island nation for denying its wartime atrocities. Now, Japan's only hope lies in the three Guardian Monsters — Mothra, King Ghidorah and Baragon — who unite to battle Godzilla and save the country from total annihilation. This 2001 outing for the King of the Monsters ignored the continuity of the previous films and instead served as a direct sequel to the 1954 original. Popularly known as GMK, it featured new designs for all four kaiju depicted on-screen, none more striking than Godzilla itself with shocking all-white eyes. A box-office hit, GIANT MONSTERS ALL-OUT ATTACK was directed by Shûsuke Kaneko, known for his work on the competing monster franchise GAMERA, and is a favorite of director Takashi Yamazaki, who was inspired by the film when writing the screenplay for GODZILLA MINUS ONE. DIR/SCR Shûsuke Kaneko; SCR Kei'ichi Hasegawa, Masahiro Yokotani; PROD Hideyuki Honma. Japan, 2001, color, 105 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GOJIRA] [ゴジラ] Disturbed by underwater hydrogen bomb testing, an enormous, dinosaur-like sea-dwelling creature ventures onto the land, carving a path of death and destruction across Japan. A sci-fi/horror classic that also serves as a time capsule for 1950s nuclear anxiety, GODZILLA is the granddaddy of all monster movies, fueled by the creative synergies of director Ishirō Honda, special-effects supervisor Eiji Tsuburaya and composer Akira Ifukube. It spawned a decades-long franchise totaling nearly 40 films and countless imitators — but none have ever come close toppling the King of the Monsters. DIR/SCR Ishirō Honda; SCR Takeo Murata, from the novel by Shigeru Kayama; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1954, b&w, 96 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GOJIRA TAI BIORANTE] [ゴジラvsビオランテ]
When a scientist crosses a rose and his own dead daughter's DNA with Godzilla's much-sought-after cells, he unleashes the fearsome flora Biollante, a giant tentacled kaiju that wreaks havoc across Japan — until Godzilla escapes its imprisonment beneath the volcanic Mount Mihara and turns its atomic breath on the dreadful plant. Where the original GODZILLA film explored nuclear anxiety, GODZILLA VS. BIOLLANTE probes '80s paranoia over genetic engineering, birthing one of the franchise's most iconic creature designs and ushering in a trope where the King of the Monster's foes would evolve into even more horrendous and formidable behemoths. DIR/SCR Kazuki Ômori PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1989, color, 104 min. In Japanese and English with English subtitles. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GOJIRA TAI DESUTOROIA] [ゴジラVSデストロイア]
In the final film of the Godzilla franchise's Heisei era, the titular kaiju is on the verge of a meltdown after its nuclear-reactor heart is irradiated by uranium, turning it into a glowing, steam-emitting menace whose explosive death will ignite the Earth's atmosphere. But that's not the only threat to the world: a colony of Precambrian crustaceans, mutated by the Oxygen Destroyer from the 1954 film, emerge from the depths and merge into the demonic, flying behemoth Destoroyah. Naturally, the two come to blows, though it seems whichever creature wins, humanity loses. Featuring two of the long-running series' most unique and beloved creature designs, GODZILLA VS. DESTOROYAH was a commercial success, no doubt in large part due to Toho's advertising campaign that promised this would be the film in which "Godzilla dies!" DIR Takao Okawara; SCR Kazuki Ômori; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka, Shogo Tomiyama. Japan, 1995, color, 103 min. In Cantonese, Japanese and English with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GOJIRA TAI HEDORA] [ゴジラ対ヘドラ]
Amid rampant pollution threatening to suffocate Japan, a tadpole-like alien creature lands in the sullied islands and feasts upon the industrial waste. Fueled by the grime and smog, the creature, Hedorah, transforms into a giant monster (that can fly!), and it's up to fellow kaiju Godzilla to defeat the ecological monstrosity. In his first and only outing directing the King of the Monsters, Yoshimitsu Banno sought to warn Japanese audiences of a very real dilemma facing their country and did so with trippy psychedelic visuals, animated sequences and one of the strangest rogues in Godzilla's gallery. DIR/SCR Yoshimitsu Banno; SCR Kaoru Mabuchi; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1971, color, 85 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GOJIRA TAI MEKAGOJIRA] [ゴジラ対メカゴジラ]
What's better than one Godzilla? Two Godzillas! In this Jun Fukuda–directed entry in the long-running franchise, a fearsome mechanical doppelgänger terrorizes Japan at the behest of a malevolent alien race hell-bent on conquering Earth. Can the real flesh-and-blood Godzilla put an end to the wicked walking weapon's terror? Only if it accepts the help of Okinawa's guardian protector, King Caesar! DIR/SCR Jun Fukuda; SCR Hiroyasu Yamamura; PROD Tomoyuki Tanada. Japan, 1974, color, 84 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. RATED PG

FREE for Silver Cinema Club members on Sunday, August 18! Log in to your Silver Rewards account to reserve your free ticket. Not a member? Sign up here.

AFI Member passes accepted.

This film is the apotheosis of MGM's carefully cultivated prestige, meticulously crafted glamour and bevy of bankable stars, with Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery and Lionel Barrymore playing characters whose personal dramas intersect at Berlin's most luxurious hotel. Guided then by the brilliant Irving Thalberg, the studio was known for having superb talent behind and in front of the camera, and the film's real star is the Art Deco hotel sets designed by the legendary art director Cedric Gibbons. Oscar® winner for Best Picture, 1932. DIR Edmund Goulding; SCR Béla Balázs, William A. Drake, based on Drake’s play, based on the novel "Menschen im Hotel" by Vicki Baum; PROD Irving Thalberg. U.S., 1932, b&w, 112 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In the treacherous and swampy forests that make up the so-called “green border” between Belarus and Poland, refugees from the Middle East and Africa are lured by government propaganda promising easy passage to the European Union. Unable to cross into Europe and unable to turn back, they find themselves trapped in a rapidly escalating geopolitical stand-off. An unflinching depiction of the migrant crisis captured in stark black-and-white, this riveting film explores the intractable issue from multiple perspectives: a Syrian family fleeing ISIS caught between cruel border guards in both countries; young guards instructed to brutalize and reject the migrants; and activists who aid the refugees at great personal risk.

Thirty years after EUROPA EUROPA, three-time Oscar® nominee Agnieszka Holland brings a masterful eye for realism and deep compassion to this blistering critique of a humanitarian calamity that continues to unfold. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at the 2023 Venice Film Festival, Green Border is a poignant and essential work of cinema that opens our eyes and speaks to the heart, challenging viewers to reflect on the moral choices that fall to ordinary people every day. DIR/SCR/PROD Agnieszka Holland; SCR Maciej Pisuk, Gabriela Łazarkiewicz-Sieczko; PROD Fred Bernstein, Marcin Wierzchoslawski. Poland, France, Czech Republic, Belgium, 2023, b&w, 152 min. In Polish, Arabic, English and French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

In this touching look at bittersweet memories gilded by the passage of time and the malaise of stultifying routine, Robert Young stars as Harry Moulton Pulham Jr., Esq., a man so dedicated to his conventional life that he has calcified himself into bland rigidity. After being tasked with organizing a 25th-anniversary college reunion, Harry is engulfed by the memories of his youth and the passion he shared with lively co-worker Marvin Myles (Hedy Lamarr) and begins to rue the sterile and joyless path he chose over the woman who made him feel alive. Attempting to preserve the strictly first-person viewpoint novel used in John P. Marquand's source novel, King Vidor boldly contains the entirety of the film within Harry’s solipsism, inviting the audience to sink into the weight of years of repression. DIR/SCR/PROD King Vidor; SCR Elizabeth Hill, from the novel by John P. Marquand. U.S., 1941, b&w, 120 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Following the death of their close friend, a trio of men just entering middle age — Ben Gazzara, Peter Falk and John Cassavetes — quit their Long Island suburban lives (and wives) for a trip to London and an extended round of debauchery. "By turns ribald, witty, cruel and moving, HUSBANDS leaves the audience to find answers to the questions it raises about responsibility, marriage and mortality… Some critics think HUSBANDS the richest of Cassavetes' films." — John Wakeman, “World Film Directors, Volume Two.” DIR/SCR John Cassavetes; PROD Al Ruban. U.S., 1970, color, 131 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Stanley Donen secured his reputation as a (non-musical) comedy director with this tart and tender farce that hearkens back to Ernst Lubitsch, Mitchell Leisen and George Cukor. London-based theater actress Anna Kalman (Ingrid Bergman) leads a lonely life until wealthy diplomat Philip Adams (Cary Grant) sweeps her off her feet. While he claims to be stuck in a loveless marriage, he may just be scared of commitment. Donen paired the two lovers in bed together — taboo in 1958 — thanks to a clever split-screen shot: Bergman and Grant are seen conversing side by side but separated by a Paris-to-London phone call! DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Norman Krasna, from her play "Kind Sir." UK, 1958, color, 100 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nobel Prize–winner William Faulkner's 1948 novel "Intruder in the Dust" is a high-minded piece of crime fiction, written as atonement for the mistreatment of Black people in his native Mississippi. In this screen adaptation, Juano Hernandez memorably portrays proud African American farmer Lucas Beauchamp, who is accused of murdering a white man. When the county's most prominent lawyer (David Brian) refuses to defend him, it's up to a young boy (Claude Jarman Jr.) to stand up to the vigilantes and help solve the crime. (Note adapted from Noir City.) DIR/PROD Clarence Brown; SCR Ben Maddow, from the novel by William Faulkner. U.S., 1949, b&w, 87 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman play the awful musical comedy team of Lyle Rogers and Chuck "The Hawk" Clarke, who book a gig in Morocco but wind up in the fictional neighboring nation of Ishtar, where they become embroiled with the local revolution — and a lovely revolutionary (Isabelle Adjani). A CIA agent (Charles Grodin) enlists Chuck in the intrigue, rationalizing the low salary with: "You can't really put a price on democracy, can you?" An infamous, money-losing bomb upon release, with its quirky daring and genius then lost on critics and audiences alike, ISHTAR has gradually endeared itself to adventurous viewers and won a measure of hard-earned cult status. The film's daft musical numbers were composed by ace songwriter Paul Williams, with contributions by May, Beatty and Hoffman. DIR/SCR Elaine May; PROD Warren Beatty. U.S., 1987, color, 107 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Army buddies Ted (Gene Kelly), Doug (Dan Dailey) and Angie (Michael Kidd) "March, March" through a dizzy montage of Manhattan's bars, the night culminating in a drunken taxicab tango and trashcan-lid tap dance. When the postwar years bring bitter disappointment, the trio reunites and rediscover their youthful élan: Doug sends up the Madison Avenue hucksters he now works for in "Situation Wise" Ted finds new love with a headstrong advertising executive (Cyd Charisse) and declares "I Like Myself" in the famous roller-skating number; and the three run riot on a TV variety show (with a standout Dolores Gray playing the host). DIR Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly; SCR Betty Comden, Adolph Green; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1955, color, 102 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Sir Walter Scott's classic tale of medieval England gets the Technicolor treatment. Saxon noble Wilfred of Ivanhoe (Robert Taylor) remains loyal to Norman King Richard the Lionheart, off fighting the Crusades and lately held for ransom by the king of Austria. Ivanhoe seeks to raise the ransom, but various tensions — Saxon vs. Norman infighting, England's distrust of its persecuted Jewry and Prince John's lust for his brother's throne — work against him. Ivanhoe eventually joins with Robin Hood to save the day and his beloved king. The stellar cast also includes Joan Fontaine, Elizabeth Taylor, George Sanders, Emlyn Williams and Finlay Currie. DIR Richard Thorpe; SCR Noel Langley, from the novel by Walter Scott; PROD Pandro S. Berman. U.S./UK, 1953, color, 106 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

FREE SCREENING! Tickets are limited to four per reservation and are not a guarantee of admission. You must be seated at least 15 min. prior to showtime. Seating is limited, so please arrive early. Empty seats will be released to standby line guests.

James Baldwin tells his own story in this emotional portrait. Using rarely seen archival footage from nine different countries, JAMES BALDWIN: THE PRICE OF THE TICKET melds intimate interviews and eloquent public speeches with cinéma vérité glimpses of Baldwin and original scenes from his extraordinary funeral service in December 1987. His close friends and colleagues — and even critics — illuminate the narrative, among them writers Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and William Styron, plus entertainer Bobby Short. Karen Thorsen's documentary captures the passionate intellect and courageous writing of a man who was born Black, impoverished, gay and gifted. DIR/SCR/PROD Karen Thorsen; SCR Douglas K. Dempsey; PROD William Miles. U.S., 1989, b&w/color, 87 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

The first feature for which celebrated international auteur Yorgos Lanthimos received sole directorial credit, KINETTA takes place in a desolate Greek resort town where three tenuously connected people are motivated by mysterious impulses. A plainclothes cop pursues triple passions for cars, tape recorders and Russian women; a lonely, lovesick clerk works as a part-time photographer; and a hotel maid aspires to be an actress through unconventional methods. This darkly humorous and insinuatingly hypnotic film is an extraordinary early effort by Lanthimos, whose first three solo narrative features (this one, along with DOGTOOTH and ALPS) defined the Greek New Wave before he shifted to English-language films, including Academy Award®–winners THE FAVOURITE and POOR THINGS. (Note adapted from the Museum of the Moving Image.) DIR/SCR Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Yorgos Kakanakis; PROD Athina Rachel Tsangari. Greece, 2005, color, 95 min. In Greek with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[KINGU KONGU TAI GOJIRA] [キングコング対ゴジラ]
It didn't take long for this iconic duo to square off against each other — in fact, KING KONG VS. GODZILLA is the third entry in both titan's filmography. Originally conceived as a battle between Kong and a giant Frankenstein's Monster, this version has a devious pharmaceutical company steal away the King of Beasts for a PR stunt only to face the consequences when a giant octopus gets in their way. Meanwhile, a submarine accidentally awakens Godzilla from its iceberg slumber, who then makes a beeline for Japan. The two kaiju soon converge for an all-out brawl atop Mt. Fuji. DIR Ishirô Honda; SCR Shinichi Sekizawa; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1962, color, 97 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ill-equipped for motherhood and matrimonial bliss, a 20-something (Meryl Streep) walks out on her husband (Dustin Hoffman) and young son (Justin Henry) but returns later for a climactic custody battle featuring courtroom scenes retooled by Streep herself. Glenda Jackson and Jane Fonda turned down the role, opening the way for Streep's first Oscar® win. The film earned four additional statuettes, for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Best Screenplay. DIR/SCR Robert Benton, from the novel by Avery Corman; PROD Stanley R. Jaffe. U.S., 1979, color, 105 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

[L'ÉTÉ DERNIER]
With her first film in a decade, the fearless French auteur Catherine Breillat (FAT GIRL, THE LAST MISTRESS) proves she's as provocative as ever with her Cannes-stirring film, which drives down the dark road of uncontrollable passion. A remarkably nuanced, radiant Léa Drucker plays Anne, an attorney who has plateaued in her marriage to Pierre (Olivier Rabourdin), a distracted businessman. His son from a previous marriage, troubled 17-year-old Theo (Samuel Kircher), has recently returned to Pierre's ineffectual and despondent care. When Pierre leaves town for a business trip, Anne and Théo — confined under the same roof for the first time — find themselves in the throes of an unexpected and dangerously lustful affair, threatening the stability of the household. Music by Kim Gordon heightens the erotic tension of LAST SUMMER, a film that boldly surveys power dynamics, female desire and fulfillment. DIR/SCR Catherine Breillat; SCR Pascal Bonitzer, based on the film QUEEN OF HEARTS written by May el-Toukhy and Maren Louise Käehne; PROD Saïd Ben Saïd. France, 2023, color, 104 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

No Passes accepted.

"She may be his wife, but she's my fiancée!" After alleging that socialite Connie Allenbury (Myrna Loy) is a home-wrecker, newspaperman Warren Haggerty (Spencer Tracy) concocts a desperate scheme to escape a $5 million libel suit brought by the miffed Connie against his paper: prove that his false accusation is true. To that end, he steers Connie toward well-known lady-killer Bill Chandler (William Powell). Meanwhile, Warren arranges for his own long-suffering fiancée, Gladys (Jean Harlow), to secretly marry Bill. What could possibly go wrong? Directed by Jack Conway with a screenplay co-written by "Chicago" playwright Maurine Dallas Watkins, the film features great comedic performances from four iconic stars. Though nominated for an Oscar® for Best Picture, it lost out to THE GREAT ZIEGFIELD — which also starred Powell and Loy. DIR Jack Conway; SCR George Oppenheimer, Howard Emmett Rogers, Maurine Dallas Watkins, from a story by Wallace Sullivan; PROD Lawrence Weingarten. U.S., 1936, b&w, 98 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Five-year-old Saroo gets lost on a train that takes him thousands of miles across India, away from his home and family, where he learns to survive alone on the streets of Kolkata — until he's adopted by an Australian couple (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham). Twenty-five years later, armed with only a handful of memories, his unwavering determination and a revolutionary technology known as Google Earth, he sets out to find his lost family and finally return to his first home. In his feature directorial debut, Garth Davis tells a sincerely stirring true story about identity and the ties that bind, with moving performances from Kidman, Dev Patel as the adult Saroo and Rooney Mara as his girlfriend. DIR Garth Davis; SCR Luke Davies, from the book "A Long Way Home" by Saroo Brierley; PROD Iain Canning, Angie Fielder, Emile Sherman. Australia/UK, 2016, color, 118 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

"How did they ever make a movie of 'Lolita'?" was the clever advertising copy for Stanley Kubrick's controversial adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's enduringly scandalous classic. The answer includes an Oscar®-nominated screenplay by Nabokov himself (although it bears only a slight resemblance to the film Kubrick made) and tweaking the age of Lolita (Sue Lyon) to age 14 (she was 12 in the book), plus expert performances by Shelley Winters as her comically deluded mother and the ever-urbane James Mason as Humbert Humbert, whose mild manner and charming erudition mask the most unruly of passions. Keep an eye out for Peter Sellers as Humbert's romantic rival Clare Quilty, lurking about early and often in a variety of disguises. DIR Stanley Kubrick; SCR Vladimir Nabokov, from his novel; PROD James B. Harris. U.S./UK, 1962, b&w, 153 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In pursuit of a serial killer, an FBI agent uncovers a series of occult clues that she must solve to end his terrifying killing spree. Starring Maika Monroe, Blair Underwood, Alicia Witt and Nicolas Cage. "With LONGLEGS, writer-director Osgood Perkins delivers the kind of payoff we sought out as kids, daring ourselves to watch films about boogeymen that made us want to sleep with the lights on." — Peter Debruge, Variety. DIR/SCR Osgood Perkins; PROD Nicolas Cage, Dave Caplan, Chris Ferguson, Dan Kagan, Brian Kavanaugh-Jones. U.S., 2024, color, 101 min. RATED R

No Passes accepted.

When Parisian actress Yvonne Orlac (Frances Drake) announces that she is leaving the stage to be a full-time wife to her concert-pianist husband, Stephen (Colin Clive), brilliant surgeon Dr. Gogol (Peter Lorre), who is obsessed with Yvonne, is crushed. So when Stephen loses his hands in a train wreck, Gogol agrees to Yvonne's request to graft another pair of hands onto him. But before long, Stephen realizes that these new hands seem to have a mind of their own. He can no longer play the piano — but he can throw knives with deadly accuracy! It turns out the hands belonged to an executed murderer, and they haven't lost the desire to kill. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.). DIR Karl Freund; SCR John L. Balderston, P.J. Wolfson, from a novel by Maurice Renard; PROD John W. Considine Jr. U.S., 1935, b&w, 68 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Orphaned by the sinking of a steamboat as young boys, Jim Wade and Blackie Gallagher are taken in by a fellow survivor — until another tragedy sends them on divergent paths: Jim (William Powell) becomes a hotshot lawyer, while Blackie (Clark Gable) runs an illicit casino. Despite being on opposite sides of the law, the two remain close friends and both fall for the lovely Eleanor (Myrna Loy). But as Jim's career takes off and he runs for governor, he has to decide if his allegiances lay with Blackie or the law. MANHATTAN MELODRAMA features the only on-screen pairing of Gable and Powell and the first of Powell and Loy, as well as one of Mickey Rooney’s earliest movie appearances, as the young version of Blackie. DIR W.S. Van Dyke; SCR Oliver H.P. Garrett, Joseph L. Mankiewicz; PROD David O. Selznick. U.S., 1934, b&w, 93 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nicole Kidman goes glamour-free for her turn as the lead character of writer/director Noah Baumbach's naturalistic follow-up to The Squid and the Whale, both of which explore some monumentally thorny, and often cringey, family dynamics. Margot's sister Pauline (Jennifer Jason Leigh) is getting married, and though the two haven't spoken in years, the hypercritical novelist Margot shows up for the occasion, even if she has ulterior motives for being there. She doesn't approve of Pauline's choice (Jack Black) or much else, for that matter. The sisters bring out the worst in each other and their deep-rooted resentments come to a head over the fraught wedding weekend in Baumbach's comedy of familial discomfort, elevated by Kidman and Leigh’s intrepid performances. DIR/SCR Noah Baumbach; PROD Scott Rudin. U.S., 2007, color, 91 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Albert Brooks wrote, directed and starred in this romantic comedy about a neurotic film editor so in love with his girlfriend (Kathryn Harrold) that he can't take it and breaks up with her, only to woo her again, then break up, then woo, then… A darkly comic and observant film that even Stanley Kubrick admired — according to Brooks, the famed director called him to say, " How did you make this movie? I've always wanted to make a movie about jealousy." DIR/SCR Albert Brooks; SCR Monica Johnson; PROD Andrew Scheinman, Martin Shafer. U.S., 1981, color, 94 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[MOSURA TAI GOJIRA] [モスラ対ゴジラ]
Godzilla faces off against the benevolent insect monster-god Mothra in this clash of the titans, a crossover battle between two of Toho Studios' most popular monsters — the last in which Godzilla would figure as a malevolent villain rather than a fearsome hero. MOTHRA VS. GODZILLA marks a creative high point in the Godzilla series, with pointed social commentary from director Ishirō Honda, a masterful score by Akira Ifukube and astonishing special-effects work by Eiji Tsuburaya. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR Ishirō Honda; SCR Shin'ichi Sekizawa; PROD Tomoyuki Tanaka. Japan, 1964, color, 89 min. In Japanese and Marshallese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

With its eight Academy Award® nominations, director Baz Luhrmann's phantasmagorical musical has been hailed as one of the most visually inventive and wildly kinetic films in recent memory for its mixture of turn-of-the-century Parisian nightlife, late 20th-century pop music (beautifully performed in the film by star-crossed lovers Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor) and astonishingly ornate Academy Award®–winning production and costume design, courtesy of Catherine Martin. (Note courtesy of American Cinematheque.) DIR/PROD/SCR Baz Luhrmann; SCR Craig Pearce; PROD Fred Baron, Martin Brown. Australia/U.S., 2001, color/b&w, 127 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

This hilarious comedy from director Stanley Donen — actually two films in one — is a toast to the classic B movies of Hollywood's heyday when the double feature was king. DYNAMITE HANDS (in black and white, of course) is the story of the impoverished Joey Popchik (Harry Hamlin), who, with the help of trainer Gloves Malloy (George C. Scott), steps into the ring to fight ne'er-do-well pugilist Vince Marlow (Eli Wallach) so he can win $25,000 to cure his sister's failing eyesight. BAXTER'S BEAUTIES OF 1933 (in gorgeous living color, naturally) follows the fortunes of childless Broadway producer Spats Baxter (George C. Scott) and parentless Kitty Simpson (Rebecca York), brought together when the former stages one last big musical in the wake of a deathly diagnosis from his doctor. Vincent Canby of The New York Times ranked MOVIE MOVIE as the fourth best picture of 1978, saying that "Stanley Donen's remembrance of double-features past is a delight." (Note adapted from Park Circus.) DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Larry Gelbart, Sheldon Keller. U.S., 1978, b&w/color, 105 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Greer Garson delivers an Academy Award®–winning performance as a British woman whose courage and grace hold her family together through the terror of the World War II German Blitz. Lauded by Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the film eloquently captures the hopes of England and America at a time when defeat by Nazi Germany seemed imminent, Mrs. Kay Miniver (Garson) refuses to allow the war to destroy her family even as she huddles with her children through bombing raids, faces enemy paratroopers and fears for her husband's life as he fights in a string of crushing defeats. In addition to Garson's Best Actress statue, the film netted Oscar® wins for Best Director (William Wyler), Best Supporting Actress (Teresa Wright), Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Cinematography. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR/PROD William Wyler; SCR George Froeschel, James Hilton, Claudine West, Arthur Wimperis, from the novel by Jan Struther; PROD Sidney Franklin. U.S., 1942, b&w, 134 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ever since he was a boy, Benjamin Franklin Gates (Nicolas Cage) has been obsessed with finding the legendary Knights Templar Treasure, the greatest fortune known to man. As Gates tries to uncover and decipher ancient riddles that will lead him to it, he is dogged by a ruthless enemy (Sean Bean) who wants the riches for himself. Now in a race against time, Gates must steal one of America's most sacred and guarded documents — the Declaration of Independence — or let it, and a key clue to the mystery, fall into dangerous hands. Also starring Diane Kruger, Justin Bartha, Jon Voight, Harvey Keitel and Christopher Plummer. (Note adapted from Walt Disney Pictures.) DIR/PROD Jon Turteltaub; SCR Jim Kouf, Cormac Wibberley, Marianne Wibberley; PROD Jerry Bruckheimer. U.S., 2004, color, 131 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Garbo laughs!" And so will you, in Ernst Lubitsch's sparkling and mirthful romance, as stern Soviet special envoy Nina Ivanovna Yakushova (Greta Garbo) — call her Ninotchka — travels to Paris to sort out wayward emissaries Iranoff (Sig Rumann), Buljanoff (Felix Bressart) and Kopalski (Alexander Granach), who've bungled the sale of some confiscated White Russian jewelry and become corrupted by the decadent West. Suave Count Leon d'Algout (Melvyn Douglas) tries his darnedest to have the same effect on stone-faced Ninotchka but fails to crack her defenses — until he stumbles upon her funny bone. DIR/PROD Ernst Lubitsch; SCR Charles Brackett, Walter Reisch, Billy Wilder, from a story by Melchior Lengyel. U.S., 1939, b&w, 110 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Crackling dialogue and one memorable set piece after another — including a murder at the United Nations, the crop-duster attempt on the life of Roger Thornhill (Cary Grant) and the climactic duel on Mount Rushmore — make Alfred Hitchcock's mistaken-identity thriller a classic that shows no signs of age. Co-starring James Mason as the unctuous villain, Martin Landau as his creepy henchman and the luminous Eva Marie Saint as a double (maybe triple) agent. DIR/PROD Alfred Hitchcock; SCR Ernest Lehman. U.S., 1959, color, 136 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Social-drama specialist Stanley Kramer's nuclear-holocaust film — apocalyptic sci-fi, but all too plausible when it was made in 1959 — still packs a punch. World War III breaks out in 1964; the superpowers' nuclear arsenals wipe out life across the northern hemisphere, with the fallout moving inexorably south. Australia assumes command of what remains of human society. When a mysterious Morse code signal comes in from the U.S. West Coast, Commander Dwight Towers (Gregory Peck) and his crew — the lone survivors of the American military — are dispatched to investigate. Ava Gardner, Anthony Perkins and Fred Astaire give excellent supporting performances. DIR/PROD Stanley Kramer; SCR John Paxton, from the novel by Nevil Shute. U.S., 1959, b&w, 134 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"So exuberant that it threatens at moments to bounce right off the screen." – TIME. "New York, New York," sing three sailors (Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra and Jules Munshin) on shore leave in the celebrated opening sequence. The trio cavorts from the Brooklyn Navy Yard up to the Bronx, down to the Battery and everywhere in between. This film is a location-shot, whirlwind tour of the city that revolutionized the movie musical. The memorable music is by Leonard Bernstein and Roger Edens. DIR Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly; SCR Betty Comden, Adolph Green; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1949, color, 98 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

From producer David Heyman (HARRY POTTER) and inspired by Michael Bond's beloved picture books, PADDINGTON details the comic misadventures of a young Peruvian bear (voiced by Ben Whishaw) who travels to London in search of a home. Finding himself lost and alone, he begins to realize that city life is not all he had imagined — until he meets the kindly Browns (Sally Hawkins and Hugh Bonneville) and their children, who read the label around his neck that says, "Please look after this bear. Thank you." They offer him a temporary haven, and it looks as though his luck has changed — but then this rarest of bears catches the eye of a museum taxidermist (Nicole Kidman). Additional characters are voiced by Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon; the film also stars Julie Walters, Peter Capaldi and Jim Broadbent. DIR/SCR Paul King; SCR Hamish McColl, based on the character created by Michael Bond; PROD David Heyman. UK/France/U.S., 2014, color, 95 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Double-crossed by his gang, stoic, implacable Walker (Lee Marvin), "an anachronism from the '50s transported to San Francisco and LA of the '60s, a world of concrete slabs and menacing vertical lines..." (Time Out Film Guide), methodically hunts down those who betrayed him — starting with the partner who left him for dead, then stole his money and his wife. The film is a violent and vivid fusion of French New Wave style and hard-boiled noir substance. John Boorman's greatest film features Keenan Wynn, Carroll O'Connor, John Vernon and Angie Dickinson giving top-of-their-game performances. DIR John Boorman; SCR Alexander Jacobs, David Newhouse, Rafe Newhouse, from "The Hunter" by Donald E. Westlake; PROD Judd Bernard, Robert Chartoff. U.S., 1967, color, 92 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Yorgos Lanthimos teamed up with producer Emma Stone to craft the incredible tale of Bella Baxter (Stone in an Oscar®-winning performance), a young woman brought back to life by the brilliant and unorthodox scientist Dr. Godwin Baxter (Willem Dafoe). Under Baxter's protection, Bella is eager to learn. Hungry for the worldliness she is lacking, Bella runs off with Duncan Wedderburn (Mark Ruffalo), a slick and debauched lawyer, on a whirlwind adventure across the continents. Free from the prejudices of her times, Bella grows steadfast in her purpose to stand for equality and liberation. DIR/PROD Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Tony McNamara, from the novel by Alasdair Gray; PROD Ed Guiney, Andrew Lowe, Emma Stone. Ireland/UK/U.S., 2023, color/b&w, 141 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Powered by a landmark Grammy®-winning soundtrack album and an Oscar®-winning score, PURPLE RAIN showcases Prince in the prime of his artistry, dazzling with his extraordinary musical ability in this semi-autobiographical tale. Against a crumbling homelife and some serious band drama, talented frontman "The Kid" (Prince) meets starry-eyed beauty Apollonia (Apollonia Kotero), a newcomer to the Minneapolis music scene. But rival musician Morris (Morris Day) is intent on taking her — and The Kid's rising stardom — away. DIR/SCR Albert Magnoli; SCR William Blinn; PROD Robert Cavallo, Steven Fargnoli, Joseph Ruffalo. U.S., 1984, color, 111 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Greta Garbo stars in one of her greatest roles, as the fiercely devoted 17th-century Swedish queen who was crowned at the age of six. In Rouben Mamoulian's film, Queen Christina has built her country into a formidable military power, threatening Russia and defeating the armies of the Vatican, defending her Protestant country against the Counter-Reformation – all while dressing as a man and vowing to live as a bachelor. To guarantee Sweden's peace and security, Christina has agreed to wed the King of Spain but loses her heart to the King's ambassador (John Gilbert), and she must choose between her duty to her country and the man she loves. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR Rouben Mamoulian; SCR H.M. Harwood, Salka Viertel; PROD Walter Wanger. U.S., 1933, b&w, 99 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In this intimate yet surprisingly humorous drama, Becca (Nicole Kidman) and Howie (Aaron Eckhart) are parents grieving the loss of their four-year-old son. It's been eight months, but there's still a palpable emptiness between the two that isn’t helped by their disagreements on the healing process: Howie wants to keep every object that reminds him of their dead son, while Becca wants to give them away and even sell the house. This is further complicated when Howie turns to a fellow griever he met in therapy (Sandra Oh) while Becca connects with a teenage boy (Miles Teller) sporting telling facial scars. Adapted by David Lindsay-Abair from his stage play and directed by John Cameron Mitchell, RABBIT HOLE offers a unique perspective on a difficult subject that proved to be fertile ground for Kidman's raw talents, resulting in an Academy Award® nomination for Best Actress. DIR John Cameron Mitchell; SCR David Lindsay-Abaire, from his play; PROD Nicole Kidman, Gigi Pritzker, Per Saari, Leslie Urdang, Dean Vanech. U.S., 2010, color, 91 min. RATED PG-13

Razz were one of the most explosive, entertaining and influential live bands in 1970s Washington, DC. From their start in 1971 to their breakup in late 1979, a cast of talent — including lead singer Michael Reidy, drummer Doug Tull, bassist Ted Niceley and guitarists Bill Craig, Abaad Behram and Tommy Keene — became a wholly original rock band amid a club scene dominated by cover bands, and a record industry that found them impossible to label. One year after their "Directors' Cut" premiere screening, the filmmakers return with even more Razz stories, music and memories in honor of iconic front man Reidy, who passed away in March. DIR/PROD Jeff Krulik, Richard Taylor. Approximately 175 min. plus a 15-min intermission.

Following the screening, attendees are encouraged to visit McGinty's Public House, where that night's live entertainment will feature several special guests.

In Memoriam: Michael Reidy (1950–2024)

Hard-working rubber plantation owner Dennis (Clark Gable) initially doesn’t take a shine to Saigon prostitute Vantine (Jean Harlow), who's hitched a ride upriver with Dennis' shiftless employee Guidon (Donald Crisp). But just as Dennis starts to warm to her wisecracking charm, surveyor Gary (Gene Raymond) arrives with his society wife, Barbara (Mary Astor), in tow. Dennis falls hard for Barbara, but Vantine's not giving up so easily. Shot on jungle sets previously used for TARZAN, this racy, pre-Code romp became the smash hit that propelled Gable to stardom. "Harlow [delivers] her zingy wisecracks with a wonderful dirty humor. Directed by Fleming in a racy, action-packed style." – Pauline Kael. DIR/PROD Victor Fleming; SCR John Lee Mahin, from the play by Wilson Collison; PROD Hunt Stromberg, Irving Thalberg. U.S., 1932, b&w, 83 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

William Powell, Rosalind Russell and Cesar Romero star in this espionage thriller with romantic-comedy touches, based on a book by the real-life head of the U.S. Secret Service during World War I. Before shipping out, new Lieutenant Bill Gordon (William Powell) becomes attracted to Joel Carter (Rosalind Russell), who, upon learning that Bill used to be a newspaper puzzle editor, arranges for him to be transferred to the War Department, where he is put to work breaking codes for Major Brennan (Lionel Atwill). When Brennan is murdered as the result of a German-Russian spy ring's machinations, Bill investigates the spies and a comely secret agent (Bonnie Barnes), which jeopardizes his newfound romance with Joel. (Note courtesy of Warner Bros.) DIR/PROD William K. Howard; SCR George Oppenheimer, P.J. Wolfson, from a novel by Herbert O. Yardley; PROD Lawrence Weingarten. U.S., 1935, b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

If Richard Pryor were accused of being the funniest man in America, this film of his incredible stage act would be Exhibit A. Shot live at the Hollywood Palladium, it captures all the excitement, lunacy and electric force of a Pryor performance — and though he's the only star of this hilarious show, he's never alone on stage. With him is his amazing array of characterizations as he talks about his trip to Africa in search of his roots, his early days playing one-night gigs in Mafia-owned clubs and strip joints and several other outrageous topics. Finally, he turns the focus to Pryor on Fire, recounting the accident that nearly took his life — an episode he relates with wit and a touch of poignancy. You'll laugh like you've never laughed before! (Note adapted from Sony Pictures Releasing.) DIR Joe Layton; SCR/PROD Richard Pryor. U.S., 1982, color, 82 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

In this dazzling example of frame-filling CinemaScope mastery, frontierswoman Milly (Jane Powell) falls for backwoodsman Adam (Howard Keel), even if he still needs a little civilizing. But his six brothers really need work, as they decide to forgo courtship of local women and kidnap prospective brides instead. The film earned five Oscar® nominations, including a win for the Gene de Paul/Johnny Mercer score, but it's the vigorous dance numbers, choreographed by Michael Kidd, that give the picture great vitality, including the stunning barn-raising ballet dance sequences. DIR Stanley Donen; SCR Frances Goodrich, Albert Hackett, Dorothy Kingsley; PROD Jack Cummings. U.S., 1954, color, 102 min. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

Musician Isaac Hayes' instantly recognizable, Oscar®-winning theme song, lead actor Richard Roundtree's charisma and heaps of streetwise attitude have ensured SHAFT's status as an all-time cult classic. But writer/director Gordon Parks' SHAFT also signaled a new direction in films made by and for African Americans. This smart, stylish homage to the tradition of hard-boiled detective fiction finds Roundtree as "the Black private dick" John Shaft, hired by a Harlem drug lord (Moses Gunn) to find his kidnapped daughter. DIR Gordon Parks; SCR John D.F. Black, Ernest Tidyman, from Tidyman's novel; PROD Joel Freeman. U.S., 1971, color, 100 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire's seventh film pairing finds them aboard an ocean liner: he a famous ballet dancer, she the renowned tap dancer he's fallen for — hard. Complicating the already fraught courtship (she's not interested), a rumor circulates that the two are secretly married to each other. The movie's catchy score is by George and Ira Gershwin, their first for a Hollywood musical (and George's last — he died later that year), and standout songs include the Oscar®-nominated "They Can't Take That Away from Me," "Shall We Dance" and the cheerful "tomato/tomahto, potato/potahto" breakup duet, "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off," to which the pair dance on roller skates! DIR Mark Sandrich; SCR Ernest Pagano, Allan Scott; PROD Pandro S. Berman. U.S., 1937, b&w, 109 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Warren Beatty had kicked around the idea of a movie about a stud hairstylist as early as the mid-1960s, but in its long gestation from gag character to fully formed script and 1975 release, SHAMPOO acquired the hard-earned wisdom of post-'60s disillusionment. Set on the eve of the 1968 election, though imbued with a Watergate-era sensibility, the movie follows Beatty's serial entanglements with bored socialite Felicia (Lee Grant), sassy Jackie (Julie Christie) and youngster Lorna (Carrie Fisher) — as it turns out, the wife, mistress and daughter, respectively, of a wealthy businessman (Jack Warden) — all the while ignoring his girlfriend (Goldie Hawn). Director Hal Ashby elicits surprisingly soulful performances from the terrific cast, while expertly alternating sexy farce with what amounts to ambient political commentary, as election updates periodically intrude via TV and radio. DIR Hal Ashby; SCR Robert Towne; SCR/PROD Warren Beatty. U.S., 1975, color, 109 min. RATED R

In Memoriam: Robert Towne (1934-2024)

AFI Member passes accepted.

The Cold War comedy of George S. Kaufman's play "Ninotchka" — adapted from Ernst Lubitsch's film starring Greta Garbo — is splendidly remade here as a song-and-dance vehicle for Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse, with Charisse as an icy Soviet bureaucrat who resists the allure of Paris, and Astaire as the Hollywood producer who convinces her to lighten up. This was the first and only reunion of the well-paired dancers after their success in THE BAND WAGON, here terrific together in "Fated to Be Mated" and solo, with Astaire high-stepping along with a top-hatted chorus in "The Ritz Roll and Rock" and Charisse legging it out in the scintillating "Red Blues." The snazzy songs are by Cole Porter. DIR Rouben Mamoulian; SCR Leonard Gershe, Leonard Spigelgass; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1957, color, 117 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

When the first sound picture of silent stars Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly, who also choreographed and co-directed the film alongside Stanley Donen) and Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen) looks to be a bomb, movie magic saves the day as Don and company rush to recut the movie as a musical, with the lilt of Kathy Selden (Debbie Reynolds) dubbed over Lina's screech. The bravura performance of "Make 'Em Laugh" by Don's boyhood friend Cosmo Brown (vaudevillian Donald O'Connor) is eclipsed only by Don's splashy song and dance performance of the title track — "the most celebrated single sequence in the history of the genre," according to film historian John Wakeman. DIR Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly; SCR Betty Comden, Adolph Green; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1952, color, 103 min. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

Academy Award® winners Frank Sinatra and Shirley MacLaine star in this taut drama about a World War II veteran whose return to his Indiana hometown catalyzes change among people whose failures and frustrations have built to the point of explosion. Dave Hirsh (Sinatra) has faced the horror of war and endured the disillusionment of trying to make a living as a writer. When he returns to Parktown, Indiana, Hirsh starts to spend time with hostess Ginny Moorhead (MacLaine), who shares his love of alcohol; creative writing teacher Gwen French (Martha Hyer); and professional gambler Bama Dillert (Dean Martin). But Hirsh's return to Parktown becomes a match tossed into the incendiary passions building in the small Midwestern town. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR John Patrick, Arthur Sheekman, from the novel by James Jones; PROD Sol C. Siegel. U.S., 1958, color, 137 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

As dutiful members of the fraternal order Sons of the Desert, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are expected to attend the upcoming annual convention in Chicago — an idea instantly shot down by their wives. Naturally, the duo succumbs to a (phony) case of Canis Delirious, whose only cure is an ocean cruise to Hawaii, but when a liner sinks en route to the tropical paradise, they must cover their tracks in order to get away with their scheme. Loosely adapted from two of their earlier shorts, the riotous SONS OF THE DESERT is one of Laurel and Hardy's most beloved feature films and the only one named to the National Film Registry. DIR William A. Seiter; SCR Frank Craven; PROD Hal Roach. U.S., 1933, b&w, 64 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

New York City, 2022: ecological disaster has struck. The world is overheated, overpopulated, mostly unemployed and underfed. The masses subsist on the Soylent Corporation's bland processed food, while the privileged pay exorbitant amounts for even a small taste of natural foods. Called on to investigate the murder of Soylent exec William R. Simonson (Joseph Cotten), jaded detective Thorn (Charlton Heston) initially just enjoys making himself at home in the rich man's world of entitlement, high above the teeming masses. But the secrets that Thorn uncover lead to one of the screen's most deliciously wicked revelations. Edward G. Robinson, in his final role, turns in a moving performance as Sol Roth, Thorn's best friend. DIR Richard Fleischer; SCR Stanley R. Greenberg, from the novel "Make Room! Make Room!" by Harry Harrison; PROD Walter Seltzer, Russell Thacher. U.S., 1973, color, 97 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

After narrowly escaping the clutches of the LAPD, extortionist bomber Howard Payne (a loony Dennis Hopper) rigs an explosive on a commuter bus set to blow if the vehicle drops even a hair below 50 miles per hour. It's up to hot-shot SWAT member Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves, cementing his action-star status) to save the day — but he can't do it without the help of passenger Annie Porter (an assured Sandra Bullock), who takes the wheel after the driver is shot. Together, the two must contend with a traffic-jammed Los Angeles — and a dangerously incomplete freeway — while Payne sets ultimatums on any attempt to rescue the passengers. Working from a tight script by Graham Yost (BROKEN ARROW, HARD RAIN, creator of TV's JUSTIFIED), cinematographer-turned-director Jan de Bont (DIE HARD, THE HUNT FOR THE RED OCTOBER) concocted a fast and furious thriller that's pure entertainment: nail-biting stunts, plentiful vehicular mayhem and electrifying chemistry from its superb cast. And did you know this essential piece of '90s action cinema was nominated for three Academy Awards®, winning for Best Sound and Best Sound Effects Editing? DIR Jan de Bont; SCR Graham Yost; PROD Mark Gordon. U.S., 1994, color, 116 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was 12. Jesus, does anyone?" In rural Oregon during the summer of 1959, four 12-year-olds head out on a journey hoping to find the dead body of a missing local boy. As the four very different friends, each troubled in his own way, Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman and Jerry O'Connell give performances of great emotional depth, as well as complete authenticity in their horseplay, teasing and juvenile attempts to understand the often-cruel world around them. Kiefer Sutherland impresses as their bullying tormentor. DIR Rob Reiner; SCR/PROD Bruce A. Evans, Raynold Gideon, based on the novella "The Body" by Stephen King; PROD Andrew Scheinman. U.S., 1986, color, 89 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ginger Rogers claimed this was her favorite of the 10 films she made with Fred Astaire, who here plays Lucky, a gambler hoping to raise $25,000 in order to prove himself worthy of his bride-to-be (Betty Furness). The plan hits a snag when he meets and falls for the beautiful Penny (Rogers), a dancer in New York. Jerome Kern composed the memorable score, which includes the enduring classic (and winner of the Best Song Oscar®) "The Way You Look Tonight," plus "Pick Yourself Up," "Never Gonna Dance" and "A Fine Romance." Choreographer Hermes Pan received an Oscar® nomination for his inspired dance direction. DIR George Stevens; SCR Howard Lindsay, Allan Scott; PROD Pandro S. Berman. U.S., 1936, b&w, 103 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"You talkin' to me?" Robert De Niro's alienated Vietnam vet/Gotham cab driver Travis Bickle yearns for a rain that will "wash all the scum off the streets," blows his big date with a beautiful politico (Cybill Shepherd), then turns mohawked crusader at the sight of a pimp (Harvey Keitel) slapping around a child prostitute (Jodie Foster). An apotheosis for all of the film's then-on-the-rise creative talents, including director Martin Scorsese, screenwriter Paul Schrader and star De Niro, TAXI DRIVER also features one of the final scores by the great Bernard Herrmann. DIR Martin Scorsese; SCR Paul Schrader; PROD Julia Phillips, Michael Phillips. U.S., 1976, color, 113 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

This is the ultimate heist film and the template for all that came after — from the assembly of the team to the painstakingly chronicled break-in to the telltale slipup. John Huston's expertly orchestrated urban crime story is one of the rare noirs to attract Oscar® recognition, garnering four nominations. A crooked lawyer (Louis Calhern), desperate to keep his nubile mistress (Marilyn Monroe), employs a just-out-of-jail master thief (Sam Jaffe) and some small-timers (Sterling Hayden, Anthony Caruso and James Whitmore) for a big score. Everything is going right the night of the break-in — until everything starts to go wrong. DIR/SCR John Huston; SCR Ben Maddow, from the novel by W.R. Burnett; PROD Arthur Hornblow Jr. U.S., 1950, b&w, 112 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

Using a structure borrowed from CITIZEN KANE, the history of producer Jonathan Shields (Kirk Douglas) is revealed through the recollections of an actress (Lana Turner), a director (Barry Sullivan) and a writer (Dick Powell) — all of whom are being wheedled by Douglas into making another film together. The script artfully weaves true Hollywood stories into a seamless and stormy melodrama that, thanks to the vision of Vincente Minnelli and the performances of an extraordinary cast, becomes the ultimate "Hollywood" movie. The film won five Oscars®, including Best Supporting Actress for Gloria Grahame as the writer's wife. (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR Charles Schnee, from a story by George Bradshaw; PROD John Houseman. U.S., 1952, b&w, 116 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Writers Betty Comden and Adolph Green create a theatrical variation of SINGIN' IN THE RAIN's studio setting, with Fred Astaire as a washed-up Hollywood hoofer aiming for a Broadway comeback. When artistic differences with the play's director (Jack Buchanan) and co-star (Cyd Charisse), plus a disastrous preview in New Haven, threaten to sink the production, the troupe turns it around with song and dance, giving us knockout numbers like "That's Entertainment" (#45 on AFI's 100 Years…100 Songs list), "A Shine on Your Shoes" and Astaire and Charisse's dream pairing in "Dancing in the Dark," plus the stylish Mickey Spillane spoof, "The Girl Hunt." DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR Betty Comden, Adolph Green; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1953, color, 111 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

A few words for anyone who sits at the poker table with the Kid: read 'em and weep. Steve McQueen brings his cool fire to the role of the Cincinnati Kid, a small-timer eager to take his chances in high-stakes poker. He gets his chance when regal, ruthless Lancey Howard (Edward G. Robinson), the elite gambler called the Man, accepts the Kid's challenge. Norman Jewison (IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT, MOONSTRUCK) directs this taut exploration of backroom gaming, building suspense with each turn of a card. Deal in Ann-Margret, Karl Malden, Rip Torn, and Joan Blondell and you have a full house of talent. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR Norman Jewison; SCR Ring Lardner Jr., Terry Southern, from the novel by Richard Jessup; PROD Martin Ransohoff. U.S., 1965, color, 113 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Somebody told me you people are crazy, but I'm not so sure about that…you seem to be all right to me." So says Lux Interior, lead singer of punk rock band The Cramps, challenging the mainstream stereotype of the crowd assembled before him at the Napa State Hospital.
On June 13, 1978, The Cramps played a show at Napa State, a psychiatric hospital in the small town of Napa in northern California. Opening for them were The Mutants, an eclectic septet of art-school punks from nearby San Francisco. Seminal Bay Area art collective Target Video was also there to capture the show using one of the first video cameras available to the public, democratizing a medium normally controlled by mainstream media outlets. The resulting VHS tape of the show is one of the most legendary documents in music history and a cult classic tape. Both Napa performances have been remastered by Dino Everett at the Punk Media Research Collection, University of Southern California, HMH Foundation Moving Image Archive. Screening in between the Napa performances is the short documentary WE WERE THERE TO BE THERE which goes into the background of Target Video and how the Napa State show happened, with rare photos and interviews from people who were at the show. The documentary also explores the deep history of Napa State and how then-Governor Ronald Reagan's policies regarding mental health facilities are still affecting people today.

THE MUTANTS AT NAPA STATE
The long-lost tape of The Mutants playing at Napa State, unedited and fully remastered from the original reel-to-reel videotape. DIR Joe Target Rees. U.S., 1978, b&w, 22 min. NOT RATED

WE WERE THERE TO BE THERE
A short documentary about how the 1978 Napa State punk show happened and its lasting effect. DIR Mike Plante, Jason Willis. U.S., 2021, color/b&w, 27 min. NOT RATED

THE CRAMPS AT NAPA STATE
The full tape of The Cramps' show at Napa State, unedited and fully remastered from the original reel-to-reel videotape. DIR Joe Target Rees. U.S., 1978, b&w, 23 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

Early 18th century. England is at war with the French. Nevertheless, duck-racing and pineapple-eating are thriving. A frail Queen Anne (Olivia Colman in an Oscar®-winning turn) occupies the throne, and her close friend Lady Sarah (Rachel Weisz) governs the country in her stead while tending to Anne's ill health and mercurial temper. When the new servant, Abigail (Emma Stone), arrives, her charm endears her to Sarah. Sarah takes Abigail under her wing, and Abigail sees a chance at a return to her aristocratic roots. As the politics of war become quite time-consuming for Sarah, Abigail steps into the breach to fill in as the queen's companion. Their burgeoning friendship gives Abigail a chance to fulfill her ambitions, and she will not let woman, man, politics or rabbit stand in her way. DIR/PROD Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara; PROD Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday. Ireland/UK/U.S., 2018, color, 120 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Struggling to make ends meet in his lavish English mansion, British earl Victor Rhyall (Cary Crant) opens his abode to American tourists but is nonplussed when brash oil tycoon Charles Delacro (Rober Mitchum) eyes his countess wife (Deborah Kerr) — and she returns the carnal looks! Naturally, Victor does what anyone would do to save a threatened marriage: call up an old flame (Jean Simmons). Adapted by Hugh and Margaret Williams from their own stage play, THE GRASS IS GREENER is a charming picture whose greatest strength is featuring four of Hollywood's most jaw-droppingly gorgeous stars. (Note adapted from Paramount Pictures.) DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Hugh Williams, Margaret Williams, from their play. UK, 1960, color, 104 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nicole Kidman earned an Academy Award® for her melancholy portrayal of suicidal author Virginia Woolf in this adaptation of Michael Cunningham's celebrated novel tracing Woolf's semi-autobiographical character Mrs. Dalloway through three generations. The film also features stellar performances by Julianne Moore, Ed Harris and the recipient of the 2003 AFI Life Achievement Award — Meryl Streep. DIR Stephen Daldry; SCR David Hare, from the novel by Michael Cunningham; PROD Robert Fox, Scott Rudin. U.S., 2002, color, 114 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

New-kid-in-town Daniel LaRusso (Ralph Macchio) becomes the target of teen bullies from the Cobra Kai karate dojo and their ringleader, Johnny (William Zabka), after he strikes up a friendship with Johnny's ex (Elisabeth Shue). Daniel is rescued from a serious beatdown by his apartment's handyman, Mr. Miyagi (Noriyuki "Pat" Morita, in an Oscar® -nominated performance), who flashes some mad karate skills of his own. Daniel-san apprentices himself to the mysterious karate master — but what's with all the "wax on, wax off" chores? Director John G. Avildsen (ROCKY) works his underdog-story magic on this winning sleeper hit that's emotionally rewarding and truly inspiring. DIR John G. Avildsen; SCR Robert Mark Kamen; PROD Jerry Weintraub. U.S., 1984, color, 126 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Dr. Steven Murphy (Colin Farrell) is a renowned cardiovascular surgeon presiding over a spotless household with his ophthalmologist wife, Anna (Nicole Kidman), and their two exemplary children. Lurking at the margins of his idyllic suburban existence is Martin (Barry Keoghan), a fatherless teen Steven has covertly taken under his wing. As Martin begins insinuating himself into the family's life in ever-more unsettling displays, the full scope of his intent becomes menacingly clear when he confronts Steven with a long-forgotten transgression that will shatter the Murphy family's domestic bliss. Yorgos Lanthimos crafted this sensational thriller brimming with unsettling humor and creeping dread, steeped in Greek tragedy, existential horror, Hitchcockian psychodrama and riveting suspense. Darting confidently between genres to subvert our expectations at every turn, THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER firmly cemented the director in the pantheon of world-class auteurs. (Note adapted from A24.) DIR/SCR/PROD Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Efthimis Filippou; PROD Ed Guiney. Ireland/UK, 2017, color, 121 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Jack Nicholson gives one of his most intense performances as David Staebler, the host of a late-night radio call-in show in Philadelphia. A shy introvert who only comes to life when spinning tales on the mic, David couldn't be more different from his fun-loving, high-living brother, Jason (Bruce Dern), who's in over his head with a racketeer (Scatman Crothers). Receiving an urgent call from Jason in Atlantic City, David heads up the Jersey Shore, first to bail out his brother, then, along with Jason's girlfriend (Ellen Burstyn), to dream and scheme about how they can hit it big. DIR/PROD Bob Rafelson; SCR Jacob Brackman. U.S., 1972, color, 103 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Jack Nicholson won Best Actor at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival for his portrayal of Billy "Badass" Buddusky, a Navy lifer with both an anti-authoritarian streak and a need for structure — a sardonic, sarcastic walking contradiction. Tasked with transporting court-martialed sailor Meadows (Randy Quaid) from Virginia to the brig in New Hampshire, Badass and his partner "Mule" Mulhall (Otis Young) opt to take the scenic route, careening through a succession of misadventures at bars, brothels, hotels and motels along the way. Hal Ashby provided understated, sensitive direction; Robert Towne earned an Oscar® nomination for his foul-mouthed and salaciously funny screenplay. DIR Hal Ashby; SCR Robert Towne, from the novel by Darryl Ponicsan; PROD Gerald Ayres. U.S., 1973, color, 104 min. RATED R

In Memoriam: Robert Towne (1934-2024)

AFI Member passes accepted.

THE LAST PICTURE SHOW is one of the key films of the American cinema renaissance of the 1970s. Set during the early 1950s in the loneliest Texas nowheresville to ever dust up a movie screen, this aching portrait of a dying West, adapted from Larry McMurtry's semi-autobiographical novel, focuses on the daily shuffles of three futureless teens — the enigmatic Sonny (Timothy Bottoms), the wayward jock Duane (Jeff Bridges) and the desperate-to-be-adored rich girl Jacy (Cybill Shepherd) — and the aging lost souls who bump up against them in the night like drifting tumbleweeds, including Cloris Leachman's lonely housewife and Ben Johnson's grizzled movie-house proprietor. Featuring evocative black-and-white imagery and profoundly felt performances, this hushed depiction of crumbling American values remains the pivotal film in the career of the invaluable director and film historian Peter Bogdanovich. (Note courtesy of The Criterion Collection.) DIR/SCR Peter Bogdanovich; SCR Larry McMurtry, from his novel; PROD Stephen J. Friedman. U.S., 1971, b&w, 126 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

In this highly imaginative, delightfully absurdist comedy from visionary director Yorgos Lanthimos — his English-language debut — Colin Farrell stars as David, who has just been dumped by his wife. To make matters worse, David lives in a society where single people have 45 days to find true love, or they are turned into the animal of their choice and released into the woods. David is kept at a mysterious hotel while he searches for a new partner, and after several romantic misadventures, he decides to make a daring escape to abandon this world. He ultimately joins a rebel faction known as "The Loners," a group founded on a complete rejection of romance. But once there, David meets an enigmatic stranger (Rachel Weisz) who stirs unexpected and strong feelings within him. Both a full immersion into a surreal world and a clever reflection of our own society, THE LOBSTER is a thrillingly audacious vision fully brought to life by Lanthimos and his terrific cast that finds the perfect balance between sharp-edged satire and romantic fable. DIR/SCR/PROD Yorgos Lanthimos; SCR Efthimis Filippou; PROD Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday. Greece/Ireland/Netherlands/UK/France, 2015, color, 119 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nicole Kidman gives an Oscar®-worthy performance as Grace, an austere British woman waiting with her children and servants for the return of her husband after World War II. She's either slowly going mad or being taunted by ghosts, the servants or her children — and there's a twist certain to enthrall. Masterful cinematography and production design pay homage to both classic Hollywood horror and to Kidman as an emerging star. DIR/SCR Alejandro Amenábar; PROD Fernando Bovaira, José Luis Cuerda, Sunmin Park. U.S./France/Spain, 2001, color, 104 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

In one of the wildest roles of her career, Nicole Kidman plays Charlotte Blessing, an Alabama woman determined to marry a convicted killer (John Cusack) she's only ever corresponded with via letters. To do so, she allies herself with Ward Jansen (Matthew McConaughey), an investigative reporter for The Miami Times who has returned to his small Florida town seeking to expose the injustices that put Charlotte's flame behind bars. Complications arise when Ward's younger brother, Jack (Zac Efron), falls in love with the older woman. Lee Daniels' follow-up to his critically acclaimed PRECIOUS, THE PAPERBOY is a lurid, star-studded melodrama filled with gator-infested swamps, carnal lust and abject betrayal. DIR/SCR/PROD Lee Daniels; SCR Pete Dexter, from his novel; PROD Ed Cathell III, Cassian Elwes, Avi Lerner, Hilary Shor. U.S., 2012, color, 107 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Michelangelo Antonioni's third and final film for MGM is his most puzzling — a fitting end to the European auteur's now-unthinkable experiment of working within the Hollywood studio system. Jack Nicholson stars as David Locke, a journalist covering a conflict in North Africa. When he discovers the corpse of an acquaintance who resembled him, he assumes the dead man's identity to explore his life — which turns out to be a dangerous one. David soon finds himself pursued by gunrunners and involved with a mysterious French student (LAST TANGO IN PARIS' Maria Schneider) on an adventure from the Algerian desert to London, Munich, Barcelona and back again. DIR/SCR Michelangelo Antonioni; SCR Mark Peploe, Peter Wollen; PROD Carlo Ponti. Italy/France/Spain, 1975, color, 126 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nominated for six Academy Awards® (it won two, one of which was James Stewart's sole Oscar® win), this sparkling comedy marked Katharine Hepburn's return to the top of the Hollywood food chain. Hepburn plays Tracy, a demanding socialite about to put her first marriage to arrogant playboy Dexter (Cary Grant) behind her with an impending marriage to boring but reliable self-made man George (John Howard). When Dexter learns that Spy Magazine intends to scandalize her philandering father, he promises the editor the scoop of a lifetime on the wedding instead. Enter journalist Mike Connor (James Stewart), who also falls head over heels for Tracy as the three men vie for her affections. DIR George Cukor; SCR Donald Ogden Stewart, from the play by Philip Barry; PROD Joseph L. Mankiewicz. U.S., 1940, b&w, 112 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Director Jane Campion followed her Oscar®- and Palme d'Or–winning THE PIANO with this adaptation of Henry James' masterwork. Nicole Kidman is Isabel Archer, a naïve young American whose beloved cousin writes her into his ill father's will. Following dear uncle's demise, Isabel is now rich beyond belief — and independent to boot. She soon ventures out into society but encounters those who wish to steal her wealth, namely the worldly and manipulative Madame Serena Merle (Barbara Hershey) and dilettante artist Gilbert Osmond (John Malkovich). The terrific ensemble cast also includes Richard E. Grant, Mary-Louise Parker, Martin Donovan, Shelley Winters, Shelley Duvall and a young Christian Bale. DIR Jane Campion; SCR Laura Jones, from the novel by Henry James; PROD Steve Golin, Monty Montgomery. UK/U.S., 1996, color, 142 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Middle-aged ad man Ned Merrill (Burt Lancaster) gets the notion that he can pool-hop across his wealthy suburban Connecticut neighbors' expansive yards and swim all the way back to his own split-level. But Ned's concept of "home," his self-image and the whereabouts of his loving wife and daughters turn out to be dreadfully elusive. In one of the key Hollywood films of the 1960s, Lancaster gives a bravura performance — in swimming trunks — with Ned's physical nakedness and vulnerability chiming with his emotional and mental unraveling and mysterious loss. DIR/PROD Frank Perry; SCR Eleanor Perry, from the story by John Cheever; PROD Roger Lewis. U.S., 1968, color, 95 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Presented in recognition of Art House Theater Day

"I'll be back.” James Cameron's landmark sci-fi action movie features Arnold Schwarzenegger's career-defining role. He plays a cyborg assassin from the future that travels back in time to terminate Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton), whose own future has somehow made her a target of unknown enemies. Also visiting from the future is Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), sent to protect Sarah from her assassin and warn her of the coming apocalypse caused when a supercomputer called Skynet turns the power of the world's machines against man. DIR/SCR James Cameron; SCR/PROD Gale Anne Hurd. U.S., 1984, color, 108 min. RATED R

About Art House Theater Day
Art House Theater Day is an annual program of Art House Convergence that brings audiences together to celebrate all that art-house theaters — and independent film — contribute to our cultural landscape: ambitious and innovative art that provokes, challenges, entertains and inspires.

AFI Member passes accepted.

Director W.S. "Woody" Van Dyke, known as "One-Take Woody" for his speedy shooting style, got this pre-Code project off the ground by promising to film it in three weeks. He wrapped in 12 days! The dream pairing of William Powell and Myrna Loy does, in fact, make it look easy, as their characters Nick and Nora Charles exchange nonstop witty banter over martinis and a variety of comic hijinks to solve the mystery of a missing inventor, the "thin man" of the title — aided by their intrepid canine companion, Asta (wire-haired fox terrier Skippy, in the role that made him a star). The roundup of suspects to reveal the guilty party became a series staple, later imitated by countless other whodunits. DIR W.S. Van Dyke; SCR Frances Goodrich, Albert Hackett, from the novel by Dashiell Hammett; PROD Hunt Stromberg. U.S., 1934, b&w, 93 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Hounded by gossip, a Manhattan society woman (Norma Shearer) resolves not to give up her straying spouse without a fight; egged on by a madcap friend (Rosalind Russell), she screws up the courage to confront the shopgirl (Joan Crawford) having an affair with her husband. Director George Cukor nimbly guides the sprawling, all-female cast, featuring memorable turns by Paulette Goddard, Joan Fontaine and Marjorie Main (in a proto–Ma Kettle role). Cedric Gibbons' stylish backdrops set the scenes for this wicked and witty satire of what women want. DIR George Cukor; SCR Anita Loos, Jane Murfin, from the play by Clare Boothe Luce; PROD Hunt Stromberg. U.S., 1939, b&w/color, 133 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

The feature directorial debut of Josh Margolin, THELMA is a poignant action-comedy that gives veteran Oscar® nominee June Squibb (NEBRASKA) her first leading role and contains the final performance of trailblazing actor Richard Roundtree (SHAFT). Squibb, who did most of her own stunts in the film, plays Thelma Post, a feisty 93-year-old who gets conned by a phone scammer pretending to be her grandson (Fred Hechinger, TV's THE WHITE LOTUS) and sets out on a treacherous quest across Los Angeles, accompanied by an aging friend (Roundtree) and his motorized scooter, to reclaim what was taken from her. Parker Posey, Clark Gregg, Nicole Byer, and Malcolm McDowell also star. DIR/SCR Josh Margolin; PROD Chris Kaye, Benjamin Simpson, Karl Spoerri, Viviana Vezzani, Nicholas Weinstock, Zoë Worth, . U.S., 2024, color, 97 min. RATED PG-13

No Passes accepted.

As the Philippines fall, PT boat captains played by Robert Montgomery (an actual wartime boat commander) and John Wayne spectacularly battle the invaders and evacuate MacArthur (one sailor even asks for his autograph) in director John Ford's masterpiece of victory in defeat. With Ford regular Ward Bond and a pre-Oscar® Donna Reed (FROM HERE TO ETERNITY). DIR/PROD John Ford; SCR Frank Wead, from the novel by William Lindsay White. U.S., 1945, b&w, 136 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Based on an outrageous but true story, Gus Van Sant's brilliant satire of America's obsession with celebrity features a breakout performance by Nicole Kidman. She portrays a conniving weather girl turned murderess whose "performance" in front of the TV cameras is almost as haunting and hilarious as Kidman's real performance in front of the movie camera. The first-rate cast also includes Matt Dillon, Joaquin Phoenix, Casey Affleck and Illeana Douglas, plus a sly cameo by David Cronenberg. DIR Gus Van Sant; SCR Buck Henry, from the novel by Joyce Maynard; PROD Laura Ziskin. U.S./UK, 1995, color, 106 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

An unemployed actor (Dustin Hoffman) disguises himself as a woman to land a part on a daytime soap; he's so good as a she that he becomes a star overnight. But he also begins to receive unwelcome attention from men and finds his desire to woo a gorgeous co-star (Jessica Lange) compromised by her fast friendship with his female alter ego. Bill Murray effortlessly steals scenes as Hoffman's blasé roommate. Sydney Pollack's rollicking comedy was nominated for 10 Oscars®, with Lange winning for Best Supporting Actress. DIR/PROD Sydney Pollack; SCR Larry Gelbart, Murray Schisgal; PROD Dick Richards. U.S., 1982, color, 116 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Tap dancer Jerry Travers (Fred Astaire) is hard at work on some new dance steps in his hotel room. The racket disturbs another guest (Ginger Rogers) in the room below, and when she charges upstairs to confront him, it's love at first fight. Though it features a record five dance numbers between the two, one of the real stars of this film is the original score, composed by Irving Berlin. Rogers insisted on wearing an elaborately feathered gown for their "Cheek to Cheek" dance, which Astaire hated (it shed profusely) — a rare instance when the two fought. A few days later, Rogers received a feather-shaped gold charm, along with this apology note (and a new nickname): "Dear Feathers, I love ya! Fred." DIR Mark Sandrich; SCR Allan Scott, Dwight Taylor, from plays by Sándor Faragó and Aladar Laszlo. PROD Pandro S. Berman. U.S., 1935, b&w, 101 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Fun-loving couple George (Cary Grant) and Marion (Constance Bennett) live a carefree life of merrymaking, but when they wind up dead after a car crash, they don't quite make it to heaven. Stuck on earth until they can perform at least one good deed, they decide to help their high-strung former boss, Cosmo Topper (Roland Young). They coax him to loosen up by doing a little drinking, dancing and flirting, but all the fun lands him in jail, to the shock and embarrassment of his wife Clara (Billie Burke), who may have to embrace the wild side herself if she doesn't want to lose her husband. Grant and Bennet shine as the daring duo at the center of this fantastical comedy produced by Hal Roach. DIR Norman Z. McLeod; SCR Eric Hatch, Jack Jevne, Eddie Moran; PROD Hal Roach. U.S., 1937, b&w, 97 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This road movie par excellence crisscrosses the 10-year marriage of Joanna and Mark Wallace (Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney) — via flashback and flash-forward — through good times and bad, during the couple's five road trips to the south of France. An editing marvel, remarkably fluent for its daring construction, the film rhymes its time-traveling cuts to visual, verbal and emotional themes shared in the life of the couple. TWO FOR THE ROAD is director Stanley Donen's most passionate film, with entrancing turns by the stars and great comic support from William Daniels, Eleanor Bron and a zesty Jacqueline Bisset. DIR/PROD Stanley Donen; SCR Frederic Raphael. UK, 1967, color, 111 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

An adaptation of John Wyndham's 1957 novel "The Midwich Cuckoos," this sci-fi classic tapped into the existential anxieties of the mid-20th century and remains chillingly relevant more than 60 years later. We're looking at you, A.I.! At 11 a.m. in the small English village of Midwich, everyone simultaneously becomes unconscious. When the residents awake, they are seemingly unhurt — but within a few days, the townspeople realize that every woman of childbearing age is pregnant. The mysterious offspring are all born at exactly the same time, share the same blank stare and mature at an unnaturally speedy pace. As their supernatural powers and lack of human emotions become increasingly apparent, one father, local scientist Gordon Zellaby (Academy Award® winner George Sanders), comes to the terrible conclusion that he must end the life of his son – and all the other kids. But how do you kill your child? Or a boy who can read your mind? (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR/SCR Wolf Rilla; SCR/PROD Ronald Kinnoch, from the novel by John Wyndham; SCR Stirling Silliphant. UK/U.S., 1960, b&w, 77 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Based on a story by Frank Capra, who sold it to director William A. Wellman because "no one would let me do a Western," this film allowed Wellman to revisit many of the themes of his 1942 THE GREAT MAN'S LADY on a more expansive scale, particularly the unsung role of women in the taming of the American frontier. Robert Taylor leads the cast as a wagon-train guide hired to take a group of 140 mail-order brides on the dangerous trek from St. Louis to a ranch town in California where prospective husbands await. Violence and calamities test the group's mettle at every turn, with Wellman matching driving action with a gritty, natural shooting style. (Note courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive.) DIR William A. Wellman; SCR Charles Schnee, from a story by Frank Capra; PROD Dore Schary. U.S., 1951, b&w, 118 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Off-screen opening lines: "I'm afraid I'm too tall for you, Mr. Tracy." “Don't worry, Miss Hepburn, I'll soon cut you down to my size." The first of a nine-film, quarter-century partnership on screen and off paired Spencer Tracy's down-to-earth sportswriter, Sam Craig, with Katharine Hepburn's renowned political columnist, Tess Harding. Hepburn bought Ring Lardner Jr. and Michael Kanin's first produced — and Oscar®-winning — screenplay, then sold it to MGM as a vehicle for herself, specifying George Stevens to direct. The classic breakfast-disaster conclusion was a late, audience-mollifying addition (even though Tess' need to cook strikes her husband Sam as silly). DIR George Stevens; SCR Michael Kanin, Ring Lardner Jr.; PROD Joseph L. Mankiewicz. U.S., 1942, b&w, 114 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Fred Astaire gracing an imaginative, surreal 16-minute ballet with his wit and unerring dance mastery; a jazzy, glorious-in-Technicolor® street carnival pulsing with movement and music; director Vincente Minnelli's lush, savvy sophistication evident in every scene — these elements highlight YOLANDA AND THE THIEF, a ravishingly beautiful fantasy about a con artist (Astaire) in a mythical Latin American country who convinces a naïve heiress (Lucille Bremer) that he's her guardian angel. It's a perfect plot to fleece the winsome mark, until love gets other ideas. Ahead of its time in tone and visual style and largely underappreciated at its release, this musical is a real find for fans of bold, inventive filmmaking. (Note courtesy of Warner Bros.) DIR Vincente Minnelli; SCR Irving Brecher; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1945, color, 108 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Eager to capitalize on the booming counterculture youth market, MGM poured $7 million into this film — an extravagant figure for that time and nearly five times what Michelangelo Antonioni spent to make BLOW-UP a few years earlier. Featuring original music by Pink Floyd and Jerry Garcia, ZABRISKIE POINT follows a handsome rebel and a restless young woman as they embark on a strange journey amid the stark and beautiful imagery of Death Valley. DIR/SCR Michelangelo Antonioni; SCR Fred Gardner, Tonino Guerra, Clare Peploe, Sam Shepard; PROD Carlo Ponti. U.S., 1970, color, 110 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.