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Macbeth is coming. A couple corrupted by their relentless lust for power have blood on their hands. Witness the gripping tale of greed, murder, deception and superstition. Once you cross the line, you can never turn back. Tony and BAFTA Award–winner Ralph Fiennes (SCHINDLER'S LIST) is Macbeth and Olivier Award–winner Indira Varma (GAME OF THRONES) is Lady Macbeth in this brand-new and critically acclaimed interpretation of one of Shakespeare's most famous tragedies. Directed by Simon Godwin, Artistic Director of the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, DC, and featuring set and costume design by Frankie Bradshaw. DIR Simon Godwin; SCR Emily Burns, from the play by William Shakespeare. UK, 2024, color, 150 min. including a 15-min. intermission. RATED PG-13

No AFI Member passes accepted.

Bernardo Bertolucci's sprawling epic charts the rise of fascism in Italy in the 20th century through the story of two unlikely childhood friends: landowner Alfredo Berlinghieri (Robert De Niro) and peasant Olmo Dalcò (Gérard Depardieu). Covering four decades in over five hours filled with sumptuous cinematography by Vittorio Storaro and a masterful score by Ennio Morricone that incorporates melodies by Giuseppe Verdi (whose death marks the birth of De Niro and Depardieu's characters), 1900 is, as noted film critic Leonard Maltin said, "a one-of-a-kind epic of great sweep, humanity and power." Featuring a supporting cast that includes Donald Sutherland as a vicious fascist, Burt Lancaster, Sterling Hayden, Dominique Sanda and famed silent film actress Francesca Bertini in her final role. DIR/SCR Bernardo Bertolucci; SCR Franco Arcalli, Giuseppe Bertolucci; PROD Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/France/West Germany, 1976, color, 317 min. In Italian, French, German and English with English subtitles. RATED NC-17

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With three adaptations of Jules Verne's adventure currently in the works, Richard Fleischer's defining version of the beloved story seems timelier than ever. Disney's Academy Award®-winning spectacle is an effects extravaganza featuring Kirk Douglas, Paul Lukas and Peter Lorre as shipwrecked survivors taken captive by the mysterious Captain Nemo (James Mason). Nemo wavers between genius and madman, willing to stop at nothing to complete his deadly crusade across the Seven Seas. The film's epic giant squid fight scene is not to be missed on the big screen, nor is Douglas' rendition of "A Whale of a Tale," a rare on-screen singing performance. DIR Richard Fleischer; SCR Earl Felton, from the novel by Jules Verne; PROD Walt Disney. U.S., 1954, color, 127 min. NOT RATED

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[PER UN PUGNO DI DOLLARI]
Italian director Sergio Leone transposed Akira Kurosawa's 1961 samurai action/comedy YOJIMBO to the American Wild West (filmed in Spain) and cast American TV actor Clint Eastwood (Rowdy Yates from RAWHIDE) as the "Man with No Name," a mysterious, poncho-clad gunslinger who plays two rival gangs of outlaws against each other in a desolate Mexican border town. The film's laconic antihero, sardonic sense of humor, stylish visuals and spectacular gunplay added up to an international box-office smash — aided immeasurably by the atmospheric, genre-defining score by Ennio Morricone. Eastwood was reportedly the 10th choice for the lead role, after Henry Fonda, Charles Bronson and James Coburn, among others, passed on it. DIR/SCR Sergio Leone; SCR Víctor Andrés Catena, Jaime Comas Gil; PROD Arrigo Colombo, Giorgio Papi. Italy/Spain/West Germany, 1964, color, 99 min. RATED R

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Fred Zinnemann's chronicle of the clash of wills between England's King Henry VIII (Robert Shaw) and Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) won six Oscars®, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Actor for Scofield. Orson Welles delights as Cardinal Wolsey, alongside a stellar supporting cast that includes an Oscar®-nominated Wendy Hiller, John Hurt, Nigel Davenport, Leo McKern, Vanessa Redgrave and Susannah York. DIR/PROD Fred Zinnemann; SCR Robert Bolt. UK, 1966, color, 120 min. RATED G

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[UN TRANQUILLO POSTO DI CAMPAGNA]
Suffering from an artistic block, successful painter Leonardo (Franco Nero) takes the suggestion of his gallerist and lover Flavia (Vanessa Redgrave) and moves his practice to a massive mansion in the Italian countryside. Leonardo is drawn instead to a neighboring decrepit villa, where his mania only intensifies as supernatural forces impact both his physical surroundings and his psychological state. Controversial on its release and contemporaneously misunderstood by critics, this giallo was Elio Petri's first collaboration with composer Ennio Morricone, who uses cacophony and Edda Dell'Orso's deceptively alluring vocals to disquieting ends for a psychosexual thriller that belies the film's ironic title. (Note adapted from the Academy Museum.) DIR/SCR Elio Petri; SCR Luciano Vicenzoni; PROD Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/France, 1968, color, 106 min. In English and Italian with English subtitles. RATED R

4K DCP restored by Alberto Grimaldi, courtesy of Cinecittà.

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Sidney Poitier originated the role of Walter Lee Younger onstage in the original 1959 Broadway production of Lorraine Hansberry's seminal play "A Raisin in the Sun," and reprised his role for the 1961 film adaptation, along with fellow Broadway castmates Ruby Dee, Ivan Dixon, Louis Gossett Jr., Diana Sands, John Fiedler and Claudia McNeil. When the Younger family receives a $10,000 life insurance policy payout following the death of their patriarch, disagreements about how best to spend the money — a new home, a new business venture, medical school for daughter Beneatha (Sands) — threaten to tear the family apart. DIR Daniel Petrie; SCR Lorraine Hansberry, from her play; PROD Ronald H. Gilbert, Philip Rose, David Susskind. U.S., 1961, b&w, 128 min. NOT RATED

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A Manhattan yuppie (Griffin Dunne) takes a walk on the wild side — '80s SoHo! — in Martin Scorsese's cult-classic black comedy. Looking for romance with an artist he's recently met (Rosanna Arquette), the poor guy instead suffers one embarrassing mishap after another, all through the night. With Teri Garr, Linda Fiorentino, Catherine O'Hara, John Heard, Verna Bloom and Cheech and Chong. DIR Martin Scorsese; SCR Joseph Minion; PROD Robert F. Colesberry, Griffin Dunne, Amy Robinson. U.S., 1985, color, 97 min. RATED R

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Despite being made 75 years ago, this Best Picture Oscar® winner is as timely as any film made today. Broderick Crawford, in an Academy Award®–winning performance, stars as backwoods lawyer Willie Stark, whose canny and calculating populist politics take him to national prominence — before chicanery and deceit lead to his shocking and sudden demise. Robert Penn Warren based his Pulitzer Prize–winning novel on the rise and fall of 1930s Louisiana governor Huey "Kingfish" Long, and this film version is given a dark noir patina by writer/director Robert Rossen (LILTH, BODY AND SOUL), Oscar®-nominated for both his script and direction, and DP Burnett Guffey. Mercedes McCambridge won Best Supporting Actress for her role as Stark's ruthless political aide, and John Ireland received a nod for his conscience-stricken newsman turned Stark press agent. This is a cautionary American classic whose warning bells have been resoundingly ignored. (Note adapted from Noir City.) DIR/SCR/PROD Robert Rossen, from the novel by Robert Penn Warren. U.S., 1949, b&w, 110 min. NOT RATED

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After the fall of Napoleon, the Restoration begins. Fulvio (Marcello Mastroianni, LA DOLCE VITA), an aristocrat who has dedicated his life to the Revolution, has become disillusioned, and his cowardice keeps him from joining his comrades — until he manages to get swept up in a suicidal uprising in southern Italy. Stunningly photographed with lush period detail and featuring the Taviani brothers' trademark magic realism and absurdist irony, ALLONSANFÀN presents Mastroianni in top form as the reluctant insurgent and one of Ennio Morricone's finest scores. (Note adapted from the American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Paolo Taviani, Vittorio Taviani; PROD Giuliani G. De Negri. Italy, 1974, color, 111 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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[LE FABULEUX DESTIN D'AMELIE POULAIN]
With her iconic bob and a whimsical sense of mischief, Amélie Poulain sent shock waves through the early aughts international art-house scene. Audrey Tautou's breakthrough role, Amélie is a waitress in a Parisian café whose vivid imagination belies a tragic childhood. After finding a curious artifact hidden in her apartment walls, she sets out on a journey to improve the lives of those around her, bringing her childlike sense of wonder to a series of escalating pranks and schemes. But it's only when she meets a mysterious stranger, Nino Quincampoix (Mathieu Kassovitz), that she starts to imagine a romantic future for herself. Filmmaker Jean-Pierre Jeunet returned to his native France to make his biggest hit following his disappointing experience in Hollywood with ALIEN: RESURRECTION. Yann Tiersen's now-classic score and cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel's rich hues also bring magic to this endlessly charming modern-day fairy tale. DIR/SCR Jean-Pierre Jeunet; SCR Guillaume Laurant; PROD Arne Meerkamp van Embden, Claudie Ossard. In French with English subtitles. France/Germany, 2001, color, 122 min. RATED R

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Country lawyer James Stewart takes time out from fishing to take on what seems an impossible case: defending bad-tempered Lt. Frederick Manion (Ben Gazzara) for murdering the bartender who allegedly raped his wife (Lee Remick). And Manion’s already confessed to the crime! Otto Preminger's tour-de-force courtroom drama also stars George C. Scott as a young hotshot prosecutor, Eve Arden as Stewart's wise-cracking secretary, real-life Army–McCarthy hearing lawyer Joseph N. Welch as the presiding judge, and the film's Grammy®-winning composer, Duke Ellington, cameos as a nightclub pianist. Filmed entirely on location in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, the film has a powerful sense of place and lived-in realism. The film earned seven Oscar® nominations and Stewart was named Best Actor by both the New York Film Critics and the Venice Film Festival. DIR/PROD Otto Preminger; SCR Wendell Mayes, from on the novel by John D. Voelker. U.S., 1960, b&w, 160 min. NOT RATED

Action and adventure extraordinaire Richard Fleischer turned to religious spectacle for the sole time with BARABBAS, to give the peripheral biblical character of the title some light. Best known as the man whose life was spared at the expense of Jesus', Barabbas (Anthony Quinn) struggles mightily with the choice Pontius Pilate had given to the masses and remains haunted by it on his path from freed convicted criminal to gladiator to seeker of faith. This elaborate production — the second screen version of Nobel Prize–winner Pär Lagerkvist's novel — boasts a wonderful supporting cast brimming with familiar faces, including Arthur Kennedy, Katy Jurado, Silvana Mangano, Jack Palance, Ernest Borgnine and a teenage Sharon Tate, who can be glimpsed as an extra. DIR Richard Fleischer; SCR Christopher Fry, from the novel by Pär Lagerkvist; PROD Dino De Laurentiis. Italy/U.S., 1961, color, 137 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[FLANDERSUI GAE]
Director Bong Joon Ho made his feature debut with this black comedy about an unemployed professor who is driven over the edge by the incessant yapping of his neighbor's dog. Little does he know that the extreme measures he employs will have dire consequences down the road. As in his other films, Bong conveys the mood of the time (in this case, the aftermath of South Korea's economic crisis in the late 1990s) with dark wit and compelling characters. DIR/SCR Bong Joon Ho; SCR Song Ji-ho, Derek Son Tae-woong; PROD Cho Min-hwan. South Korea, 2000, color, 110 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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[DOMICILE CONJUGAL]
The popularity of STOLEN KISSES ensured a third feature installment in the saga of Antoine Doinel, whose fecklessness in the face of love and life gets a more serious test here, as his marriage is threatened by estrangement and an affair with a Japanese paramour. Remarkably, Truffaut maintains a charming tone and light comedic sensibility throughout the proceedings, as Antoine eventually stumbles on the path to reconciliation and, ultimately, the responsibilities and rewards of fatherhood. DIR/SCR François Truffaut; SCR Claude de Givray, Bernard Revon; PROD Marcel Berbert. France/Italy, 1970, color, 97 min. In French with English subtitles. RATED PG

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VERTIGO stars Kim Novak and James Stewart reteamed in 1958 for this bewitching romantic comedy, one of the acknowledged inspirations for TV's long-running series BEWITCHED, which debuted in 1964. Novak plays Gillian Holroyd, the proprietor of an ethnographic art boutique in New York's bohemian Greenwich Village, who finds herself attracted to her neighbor Shep Henderson (Stewart), a staid book publisher. She is part of a local underground witch coven — including her Aunt Queenie (Elsa Lanchester), brother Nicky (Jack Lemmon) and semi-rival Bianca De Pass (Hermione Gingold) — that regularly convenes at the beatnik Zodiac Club. Gillian mischievously casts a spell to enchant Shep, who is engaged to Merle Kittridge (Janice Rule), an old college nemesis of Gillian's. But what if true love results? DIR Richard Quine; SCR Daniel Taradash, based on the play by John Van Druten; PROD Julian Blaustein. U.S., 1958, color, 106 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

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Suburban schoolteacher Ed Avery (James Mason) moonlights as a cab dispatcher to make ends meet, a fact he hides from wife Lou (Barbara Rush) and son, Richie (Christopher Olsen). But his secret comes out after he collapses and is diagnosed with a rare, potentially fatal disease. Treated with the new "miracle" drug cortisone, Ed recovers, but also develops a manic personality and delusions of grandeur, becoming increasingly unhinged as he doubles and triples his dosages. Part medical melodrama, part psychological thriller, this film packs multi-layered allegorical implications about American life in the 1950s. "Douglas Sirk meets Oliver Sacks." — author Jonathan Lethem. DIR Nicholas Ray; SCR Cyril Hume, Richard Maibaum, from an article by Berton Roueché; PROD James Mason. U.S., 1956, color, 95 min. NOT RATED

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Glauber Rocha's sophomore feature is a scorched-earth allegory about the blind followers of dead-end ideologies. Somewhere in the Brazilian hinterlands of the 1940s, ranch hand Manoel (Geraldo Del Rey) becomes an outlaw after killing his swindling boss. He pledges allegiance to Sebastião (Lidio Silva), a self-styled holy man who preaches revolt against rich landowners even as he perpetrates unspeakable acts of violent zealotry against the innocent. While the landowners hire a mercenary (Maurício do Valle) to take out Sebastião, Manoel and his wife Rosa (Yoná Magalhães) join cangaceiros Corisco (Othon Bastos) and Dadá (Sonia Dos Humildes), only to find themselves once more in league with evil, deluded forces. Steeped in history, myth, religion and politics and suffused with the feverish intensity of the blistering desert, BLACK GOD, WHITE DEVIL is one of the Cinema Novo movement's most uncompromising statements on current social issues as well as the universal problem of mindless fanaticism. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Glauber Rocha; SCR Walter Lima Jr., Paulo Gil Soares; PROD Luiz Paulino Dos Santos, Luiz Augusto Mendes. Brazil, 1964, b&w, 120 min. In Portuguese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

New 4K restoration from Metropoles Productions, based on original 35mm materials preserved by the Cinemateca Brasileira. Restoration by CineColor Digital and JLS Studios.

AFI Member passes accepted.

Sidney Poitier made his directorial debut with this unique action/comedy/Western that blends together a trenchant sense of history, a civil rights movement consciousness and some Blaxploitation entertainment value into a potent mix. Poitier stars as Buck, an ex-soldier and the leader of a wagon train of freed slaves departing the South after the Civil War to homestead in Kansas. Joining him in this endeavor is a shady preacher of dubious provenance (Harry Belafonte) and Buck's resourceful wife Ruth (Ruby Dee). The difficult journey and the task of establishing a new settlement would be challenge enough, but the wagon train of "Exodusters" must also contend with a gang of murderous marauders sent by a coterie of irate southern plantation owners to harass the former slaves and prevent them from striking out on their own. DIR Sidney Poitier; SCR Ernest Kinoy; PROD Joel Glickman. U.S., 1972, color, 102 min. NOT RATED

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In 1968, with a seed grant from the American Film Institute, Peace Corps veteran David Schickele enlisted his friend Paul Eyam Nzie Okpokam to star in a lighthearted comedy about the adventures of a young Nigerian intellectual in San Francisco. Using a docufictional style reminiscent of Cassavetes' SHADOWS, the film observes the foibles of late 1960s African-American culture with an outsider's incisive eye. The result is a vibrant snapshot of the nation's racial politics, from interracial romance to cross-cultural misunderstandings and countercultural joy. The film morphs into a documentary when the director's voice abruptly intrudes to narrate its star's enraging fate: Okpokam was accused of a crime he did not commit and thrown in prison before being expelled from the country. (Note courtesy of Kino Lorber.) DIR/SCR/PROD David Schickele. U.S., 1971, b&w, 74 min. NOT RATED

BUSHMAN was restored by the University of California's Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive and The Film Foundation. Funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation. Additional support provided by Peter Conheim, Cinema Preservation Alliance.

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Newly restored in HD and 3-D by the 3-D Film Archive! One of the most unusual 3-D movies ever made, CEASE FIRE! began as an idea by director Owen Crump, who scripted military-themed short films for Warner Bros. in the 1940s and later produced the documentary short ONE WHO CAME BACK about the air evacuation of wounded U.S. soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Where most 3-D movies of the era used the format to accentuate and exaggerate artifice, CEASE FIRE! is the rare production to employ the stereoscopic process to heighten reality, emphasizing the brutality of combat, the vastness of a cold, unfamiliar terrain and the isolation felt by a patrol of valiant fighting men. Part documentary, part drama and part cinéma vérité, CEASE FIRE! remains a unique and remarkable achievement in filmmaking. (Note courtesy of Kino Lorber.) DIR/SCR Owen Crump; SCR Walter Doniger; PROD Hal B. Wallis. U.S., 1953, b&w, 75 min. In English and Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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In precolonial Senegal, members of the Ceddo (or outsiders) kidnap Princess Dior Yacine (Tabata Ndiaye) after her father (Makhourédia Guèye), the king, pledges loyalty to an ascendant Islamic faction that plans to convert the entire clan to its faith. Attempts to recapture her fail, provoking further division and eventual war between the animistic Ceddo and the fundamentalist Muslims, with Christian missionaries and slave traders from Europe caught in the middle. Yet when the victor prevails, conflict continues — and the return of the princess and her still-revered power may very well topple the new order. Banned in Sembène's native Senegal upon release, CEDDO is an ambitious, multilayered epic that explores the combustible interstices among ancient tradition, religious colonization, political opportunism and individual freedom. (Note adapted from Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Ousmane Sembène. Senegal, 1977, color, 117 min. In Wolof, Arabic, English and Dyula with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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Giuseppe Tornatore's acclaimed 1988 love letter to cinema remains a beloved fan favorite, best enjoyed on the big screen. Successful Roman film director Salvatore Di Vita (Jacques Perrin) receives news from his mother in his Sicilian hometown that Alfredo (Philippe Noiret), the former local film projectionist, has died. This prompts a flood of memories and emotions for the man who, now seen in flashback, was a father figure and mentor to the young Salvatore, and who encouraged his love of movies and the pursuit of his dreams, wherever they might lead him. Tornatore winningly evokes the world of 1950s small-town Sicily, abetted by Ennio Morricone's masterful score, Blasco Giurato's rosy cinematography and Noiret's wonderful performance. Winner, Best Foreign Language Film, 1990 Academy Awards®; Grand Prix, 1989 Cannes Film Festival. DIR/SCR Giuseppe Tornatore; PROD Franco Cristaldi, Giovanna Romagnoli. Italy/France, 1988, color, 124 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED PG

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Join us for some creepy good fun when local TV legend Count Gore De Vol (Dick Dyszel) returns to present another cult favorite in the spirit of the original CREATURE FEATURE broadcasts, including vintage clips from the Count's vault and some interactive fun and games.

Everyone's favorite 1950s sci-fi knockoff of Shakespeare's "The Tempest" — characters in a remote setting contending with a superpowered adversary and his minions — is significant for a number of screen "firsts," including its groundbreaking depiction of faster-than-light-speed travel; its exclusively electronic score by Bebe and Louis Barron; and the iconic Robbie the Robot, a full-fledged character and a great leap forward in popular conceptions of AI. A major influence on sci-fi for generations to come — STAR TREK creator Gene Roddenberry acknowledges its influence — the film made the Library of Congress' National Film Registry in 2013. DIR Fred M. Wilcox; SCR Cyril Hume; PROD Nicholas Nayfack. U.S., 1956, color, 98 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

In a French West African colony in 1938, the town's lone cop (Philippe Noiret) is nobody's idea of Wyatt Earp, humiliated by his wife (Stéphane Audran) and sneered at by the local pimp (Jean-Pierre Marielle). Then he decides to take a stand — but is he going too far? An adaptation of Jim Thompson's noirer-than-noir pulp novel "Pop. 1280," Bertrand Tavernier's blackly comic revenge drama earned 10 César Award nominations, as well as a nod for Best Foreign Language Film at the 1983 Academy Awards®. DIR/SCR Bertrand Tavernier; SCR Jean Aurenche, from the novel "Pop. 1280" by Jim Thompson; PROD Henri Lassa, Adolphe Viezzi. France, 1981, color, 128 min. NOT RATED

Restored in 4K from the original negative by Studiocanal at L'Image Retrouvée, with color correction by Jean Achache on behalf of Bertrand Tavernier.

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Red-headed knockout Rita Hayworth becomes an overnight sensation when she's spotted by Vanity magazine honcho (Otto Kruger) and selected for supermodel stardom. Her boyfriend Gene Kelly argues that dancing's where it's at, and urges her to stay with their act. But Hayworth's newfound fame brings her offers to make the leap to Broadway — solo. Highlights include Jerome Kern and Ira Gershwin's lyrical "Long Ago and Far Away" (#92 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs) and Kelly's inventive dancing with himself on "Alter-Ego Dance." DIR Charles Vidor; SCR Virginia Van Upp, from the story by Erwin S. Gelsey; PROD Arthur Schwartz. U.S., 1944, color, 107 min. NOT RATED

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[DIABOLIK]
Based on the Italian comic-book character Diabolik, Mario Bava's campy caper is a touchstone of Swinging '60s style — all mod threads and sci-fi lounge décor — starring John Phillip Law (BARBARELLA) as the masked, sartorially resplendent super-thief. Ennio Morricone provides the groovy score; the Beastie Boys' video for "Body Movin'" paid homage and even incorporated actual clips from the film. DIR/SCR Mario Bava; SCR Brian Degas, Tudor Gates, Dino Maiuri; PROD Dino De Laurentiis. Italy/France, 1968, color, 105 min. In English. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

George A. Romero's DAWN OF THE DEAD was released overseas in 1978 but debuted in the U.S. on (Friday!) April 13, 1979. To celebrate, we're partnering with New Amsterdam Entertainment Inc.® to host a weekend of screenings along with other theaters across the U.S. In the first sequel to NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, four human survivors flee zombie-ridden Philadelphia via helicopter, landing in the only sanctuary they can find — an abandoned shopping mall in the middle of nowhere. Ensconced in the complex, the group decides to wait out the crisis, planning strategy, shoplifting supplies and, ultimately, fighting off the hordes of undead whose latent consumer instincts send them back to "an important place in their lives." Romero's 1978 classic is arguably the apex of the DEAD cycle, a masterful blend of horror and gore rarely seen on the big screen! DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein. U.S./Italy, 1978, color, 127 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

About Tom Fallows
Tom Fallows is the writer of "George A. Romero's Independent Cinema." He holds a PhD in Film Studies awarded by the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, and his research has explored a range of marginalized independent filmmakers, from home video guru Charles Band to father of the midnight movie Ben Barenholtz. Fallows also examined the rise of Blumhouse Productions in the acclaimed 2023 anthology "Indie TV: Industry, Aesthetics and Medium Specificity," and his award-winning work has been published in Horror Studies, the Journal of Popular Film & Television, the New Review of Film and Television and the Directory of World Cinema series. When not writing and researching, Fallows is the Manager, Multimedia and Digital Systems at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center.

After surviving the zombie apocalypse, a small group of scientists and military men look for answers in a secure underground bunker in Florida. Convinced they can tame the reanimated, the scientists have focused their domestication efforts on Bub, a zombie turned star pupil. But all hell breaks loose, and they are soon forced to fight for their survival. The third chapter in George Romero's zombie series, following NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) and DAWN OF THE DEAD (1978), was a milestone for zombie special effects, with blood and guts at their absolute best, courtesy of makeup gurus Tom Savini and Greg Nicotero (THE WALKING DEAD). DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein. U.S., 1985, color, 96 min. NOT RATED

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This visionary interpretation of the American West earned Terrence Malick Best Director honors at Cannes in 1979. In the early 20th century, a manual laborer (Richard Gere) accidentally kills his boss at a Chicago steel mill. He hops a train to Texas with his girlfriend (Brooke Adams) and kid sister (Linda Manz), all posing as siblings to avoid trouble. They find work on a farm during harvest time — but a love triangle develops between the young couple and the wealthy farmer (Sam Shepard). Néstor Almendros' legendary cinematography, using only natural light and shot mainly during the "magic hour" before sunset, won an Oscar®, and the film's hauntingly beautiful score garnered Ennio Morricone his first Academy Award® nomination. DIR/SCR Terrence Malick; PROD Bert Schneider, Harold Schneider. U.S., 1978, color, 94 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

The Restored Films of DEVO with Gerald Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh
The 50th anniversary of the group known as DEVO has occasioned a deep restoration and remastering project of the band's film, video and audio archives. Formed at Kent State University in the grim wake of the 1970 National Guard student massacre, DEVO emerged from its spud cocoon as a hydra-headed music, art and film collective whose rare early musical provocations would give way to perhaps the most subversive, whip (it)–smart pop group of the 20th century (with gold records to its credit). Filmmaking and music were intertwined from the beginning, resulting in the canonical short films IN THE BEGINNING WAS THE END: THE TRUTH ABOUT DE-EVOLUTION (1976), SATISFACTION (1978), THE DAY MY BABY GAVE ME A SURPRIZE (1979) and the infamous WHIP TEASE aka WHIP IT (1980), among others, in collaboration with co-director Chuck Statler. This program features new restorations and reconstructions of these titles, along with restored versions of the video-based works that followed, such as GIRL U WANT and FREEDOM OF CHOICE (1980) and their devolved Hendrix cover, RU EXPERIENCED (1984), restored from its original 35mm negative. Also included is a brand-new 4K restoration of Bruce Conner's MONGOLOID (1977), never-before-seen 16mm footage from DEVO's 1977 breakthrough appearance at New York City's Max's Kansas City, the saga of long-suffering record label boss Rod Rooter and much more. (Note courtesy of Peter Conheim and Cinema Preservation Alliance.)

Total runtime: Approx. 75 min

Film and video restoration by Peter Conheim and Cinema Preservation Alliance, from the archives of DEVO, Inc. MONGOLOID restoration courtesy of the Bruce Conner Trust. Additional archival footage provided by Daphne Shaw.

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Unemployed circus clown Louison (Dominique Pinon) applies for a job as a handyman at an apartment building in post-apocalyptic France, unaware that the ad is meant to lure people to slaughter. The butcher/landlord Clapet (Jean-Claude Dreyfus) provides human meat for his tenants. When Louison and Julie (Marie-Laure Dougnac), the butcher's daughter, fall in love, it takes all their wits to escape the knife. A surreal black comedy, the breakthrough feature of Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro established their distinct visual style, which they would bring to THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN, and Jeunet would take to even further heights with AMÉLIE. (Note adapted from Rialto Pictures.) DIR/SCR Marc Caro, Jean-Pierre Jeunet; SCR Gilles Adrien; PROD Claudie Ossard. France, 1991, color, 99 min. In French with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Before GLADIATOR and even SPARTACUS, Delmer Daves (A SUMMER PLACE, 3:10 TO YUMA) cast a mold for the gladiator epic with his sequel to THE ROBE, the 1953 biblical saga that was also Hollywood's first CinemaScope release. Well into production before its prequel had even been released, DEMETRIUS AND THE GLADIATORS niftily cashed in on the success of its predecessor and on the sensation caused by CinemaScope, going on to become one of the highest-grossing films of 1954. Picking up where THE ROBE ends, as ill-fated Christian martyrs Marcellus (Richard Burton) and Diana (Jean Simmons) meet their fate at the hands of Emperor Caligula (Jay Robinson), Daves' take on the material follows the fate of Christ's Holy Robe as it finds its way into the hands of freed slave Demetrius (Victor Mature, reprising his role). A recent convert to Christianity, Demetrius refuses to give up the robe's whereabouts to Caligula, who will stop at nothing to find the sacred relic. After a scuffle with one of the emperor's centurions, Demetrius is forced by Caligula to train as a gladiator and soon attracts the attention of Messalina (Susan Hayward), the beautiful, duplicitous wife of Claudius (Barry Jones), the man in line to succeed Caligula. Demetrius' newfound faith is put to the test by Messalina's advances, Caligula's madness and the men who challenge him in the arena. In addition to stellar turns by Mature and Hayward, watch for future Oscar® winners Ernest Borgnine (MARTY) and Anne Bancroft (THE MIRACLE WORKER), future Catwoman Julie Newmar and a pre-BLACULA William Marshall. DIR Delmer Daves; SCR Philip Dunne, based on characters created by Lloyd C. Douglas; PROD Frank Ross. U.S., 1954, color, 101 min. NOT RATED

35mm print courtesy of the George Eastman Museum, lent by an anonymous collector.

AFI Member passes accepted.

George Marshall's comedy/Western gets much mileage out of Jimmy Stewart's tenderfoot deputy attempting to tame the wild town of Bottleneck, while Marlene Dietrich's saloon singer Frenchy sets out to tame him. Fans of BLAZING SADDLES will have a new appreciation for Madeline Kahn's Lili Von Shtupp after hearing Dietrich belt out "See What the Boys in the Back Room Will Have" and "You've Got That Look." Stewart and Dietrich, two stars of seemingly opposite polarities, create some real heat together. DIR George Marshall; SCR Felix Jackson, Henry Myers, Gertrude Purcell; PROD Joe Pasternak. U.S., 1939, b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

New 4K digital restoration by Universal Pictures in collaboration with The Film Foundation.

AFI Member passes accepted.

or: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB
Stanley Kubrick's classic Cold War satire kicks off when the paranoid Brig. Gen. Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) initiates a pre-emptive nuclear strike, promoted by Gen. Buck Turgidson (George C. Scott), against the Soviet Union because he suspects the communists are poisoning America's water supply "to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids." Peter Sellers masterfully plays three distinct roles — the U.S. president, a British military man and Dr. Strangelove, the former Nazi genius recruited to work on weapons designs for the Americans. Nominated for four Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Actor for Sellers. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Peter George, Terry Southern, from George's novel "Red Alert." UK/U.S., 1964, b&w, 96 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Martin Ritt's film directorial debut, reminiscent of ON THE WATERFRONT for its depiction of a dangerous and corrupt dock-working world on New York City's Hudson River, features Sidney Poitier in his first top co-star billing. John Cassavetes plays Axel Nordmann, a drifter with a mysterious past who, newly arrived in New York, starts work as a stevedore on the docks. Toiling in the crew of the contemptible Charlie Malick (Jack Warden), who shakes him down for kickbacks, Axel befriends Tommy Tyler (Poitier) and then leaves Malick's crew to work with him, which earns both men the murderous ire of Malick. Ruby Dee shines in an early role as Tommy's wife, Lucy. DIR Martin Ritt; SCR Robert Alan Aurthur; PROD David Susskind. U.S., 1957, b&w, 85 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

The first 3-D movie produced in Mexico, the original Spanish version of EL CORAZÓN Y LA ESPADA had not been screened since 1955, until the 3-D Film Archive restored and released it in collaboration with Flicker Alley in 2020. The film stars Cesar Romero (THE THIN MAN, BATMAN) as a swashbuckling nobleman in Moorish Spain, joined by Katy Jurado (HIGH NOON) as his gold-hungry love interest and Tito Jumco (THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL) as Ponce de León, on a quest for the elixir of life. Scanned in 4K and restored frame by frame from the original left and right 35mm camera negatives by the 3-D Film Archive. (Note adapted from the 3-D Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Edward Dein; DIR Carlos Véjar hijo; SCR Mildred Dein, Rafael García Travesi; PROD Jorge García Besné. Mexico, 1953, b&w, 80 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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Giuseppe Tornatore, director of the beloved CINEMA PARADISO, turns his camera on his longtime collaborator Ennio Morricone (1928–2020) in a moving and comprehensive profile of the indefatigable composer. Tornatore's documentary portrait explores the breadth of the maestro's career, from his early Italian pop songs to the fistful of unforgettable film scores that he wrote, including THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY, THE THING, DAYS OF HEAVEN and hundreds of others. This examination thoughtfully captures insightful commentary from Morricone's closest collaborators and contemporaries, featuring testimonies from artists and directors such as Bernardo Bertolucci, Marco Bellocchio, Giuliano Montaldo, Dario Argento, Clint Eastwood, Joan Baez, Quentin Tarantino and more. ENNIO affords the master one last chance to recount his career and deconstruct the artistic process that earned him two Academy Awards® and produced over 500 unforgettable soundtracks. DIR/SCR Giuseppe Tornatore; PROD Gabriele Costa, Peter De Maegd, San Fu Maltha, Gianni Russo. Italy, 2021, color, 156 min. In Italian, English, French, Portuguese and Chinese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

An intrepid group of economists is on a mission to instigate a paradigm shift by flipping our understanding of the national debt — and the nature of money — upside down. We all use money, yet the questions of what it is and where it comes from remain elusive. FINDING THE MONEY follows former chief economist to the U.S. Senate Budget Committee Stephanie Kelton on a journey through Modern Money Theory, or "MMT," to unveil a deeper story about money, injecting new hope and empowering democracies around the world to tackle the biggest challenges of the 21st century, from climate change to inequality. DIR/PROD Maren Poitras. U.S., 2023, color, 95 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

[I PUGNI IN TASCA]
Tormented by twisted desires, a young man takes drastic measures to rid his grotesquely dysfunctional family of its various afflictions, in this astonishing 1965 feature debut from Marco Bellocchio. With its coolly assured style, shocking perversity and savage gallows humor, FISTS IN THE POCKET was a gleaming ice pick in the eye of bourgeois family values and Catholic morality — a truly unique work that continues to rank as one of the great achievements of Italian cinema. Ennio Morricone coats his sparing, eerie score with haunting female vocals, sprinkling in discordant, jarring percussion to underscore its protagonist's fraught state of mind. (Note adapted from Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Marco Bellocchio; PROD Enzo Doria. Italy, 1965, b&w, 108 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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[[PER QUALCHE DOLLARO IN PIÙ]
This semi-sequel to Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Western international sensation A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS sees two rival bounty hunters — the taciturn, serape-draped Monco (Clint Eastwood) and jaded ex–Confederate Colonel Douglas Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef) — join forces to capture the vicious bandit El Indio (Gian Maria Volonté), whose gang includes the hunchbacked stooge Juan Wild, played by Klaus Kinski. Ennio Morricone's iconic score marked the beginning of his signature use of musical riffs, trills or twangs associated with individual characters. DIR/SCR Sergio Leone; SCR Luciano Vincenzoni; PROD Arturo González, Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/Spain/West Germany, 1965, color, 132 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[4 MOSCHE DI VELLUTO GRIGIO]
A confluence of near-misses and eerie coincidences transforms the past into a prophetic conspiracy in FOUR FLIES ON GREY VELVET, the final entry in Dario Argento's "Animal" trilogy of giallo thrillers. Directorial doppelgänger Michael Brandon plays the troubled lead, a prog-rock drummer who is blackmailed by a menacing masked figure for a murder that he may or may not have committed and enlists the help of a detective (Jean-Pierre Marielle) to identify his blackmailer before it's too late. The nightmarish set pieces rank among the director's best, and the movie's playfully convoluted mystery plot looks forward to DEEP RED's gleeful synthesis of Hitchcockian sadism and Antonioni-inspired alienation. Ennio Morricone's hauntingly macabre score is a standout in the film, but tensions behind the scenes led Argento to Goblin for his next run of films, before finally reuniting with Morricone 25 years later. (Note adapted from Film at Lincoln Center.) DIR/SCR Dario Argento; PROD Salvatore Argento. Italy/France, 1971, color, 104 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

4K digital restoration by Cineteca di Bologna in collaboration with Surf Film. DCP courtesy of Cinecittà.

AFI Member passes accepted.

Fred Zinnemann's celebrated wartime melodrama features one of Hollywood's most iconic images —swimsuit-clad lovers played by Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr, adulterously embracing on a Hawaiian beach as the surf laps around them. In the days leading up to the December 7 attack on Pearl Harbor, private dramas and grudges hold sway over the restless army community: an independent-minded private (Montgomery Clift) resists his captain's overtures to box, preferring romance with club hostess (Donna Reed); a sergeant (Lancaster) silently seethes under the command of incompetent officers, and, not-so coincidentally, takes up with an officer's wife (Deborah Kerr); and a big-mouthed private (Frank Sinatra) runs afoul of a sadistic sergeant (Ernest Borgnine). Nominated for 13 Academy Awards®, winning Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor for Sinatra and Best Supporting Actress for Reed. DIR Fred Zinnemann; SCR Daniel Taradash, from the novel by James Jones; PROD Buddy Adler. U.S., 1953, b&w, 118 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

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A fabulous Lynn Redgrave plays the title girl, a charmingly unkempt, romantically inexperienced 22-year-old children's dance teacher in London continually sidestepping the aggressive advances of her housekeeper father's married employer (James Mason, playing 49 but looking much older) while crushing on Jos (Alan Bates), the playful boyfriend of her gorgeous, shallow violinist roommate (Charlotte Rampling). The couple end up marrying and having a baby, but Jos' affections for Georgy keep growing stronger. GEORGY GIRL is a highlight of Swinging '60s cinema, replete with its own catchy theme song that was Oscar®-nominated for Best Original Song, alongside nods for Redgrave and Mason's performances and its beautiful black-and-white cinematography. DIR Silvio Narizzano; SCR Margaret Forster, Peter Nichols, from the novel by Forster; PROD Robert A. Goldston, Otto Plaschkes. UK, 1966, b&w, 99 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Rita Hayworth created her Hollywood "Love Goddess" legend in this tailormade romantic drama, the first of several sex-charged pairings with costar Glenn Ford. The amazing sexual symbolism slipped past the censors (and most viewers) at the time; today the film is regarded as one of the greatest examples of a director "working around" the Production Code. (Note courtesy of the Film Noir Foundation.) DIR Charles Vidor; SCR Marion Parsonnet, Jo Eisinger, from the story by E.A. Ellington; PROD Virginia Van Upp. U.S., 1946, b&w, 110 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

GIRLS TOWN burst upon the scene at Sundance in 1996, winning several awards and dazzling audiences and critics with its bold portrayal of irreverent young women coming of age. One of the first movies about the secret shame of rape, it celebrates their zigzag path to empowerment as gleeful acts of revenge give way to something much deeper. The screenplay was created by director Jim McKay in collaboration with cast members Lili Taylor, Bruklin Harris and Anna Grace. GIRLS TOWN also includes standout performances by Guillermo Diaz, Michael Imperioli, Stephanie Berry, Tom Gilroy, John Ventimiglia and Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor (recently Oscar®-nominated for Best Supporting Actress in KING RICHARD) and an all-female soundtrack featuring Queen Latifah, PJ Harvey, Roxanne Shante, Salt-N-Pepa and others. (Note adapted from IndieCollect.) DIR/SCR Jim McKay; SCR Denise Casano, Anna Grace, Bruklin Harris, Lili Taylor; PROD Lauren Zalaznick. U.S., 1996, color, 90 min. RATED R

New 4K restoration by IndieCollect funded with support from the HFPA Trust, Donald A. Pels Charitable Trust, IndieCollect donors and Fellow Citizen, Inc.

AFI Member passes accepted.

GIVE ME A RIDDLE is a 1966 documentary by David Schickele (BUSHMAN) recounting his experience as a member of the Peace Corps in Nigeria. Before the Civil War broke out in 1967, the country was enjoying a golden age following its 1960 independence, a time full of hope and cultural ferment. Schickele is welcomed as family by the villagers, including his college-educated friends Paul Eyam Nzie Okpokam, Gabriel Ogar and Manze Ejiogu. Schickele later wrote that the film is viewed "through the eyes of ex–Peace Corps volunteer Roger Landrum, returning to his host country a couple of years after his Peace Corps service as a teacher at the University of Nigeria. The film follows Roger as he looks up his old student friends, travels with them to their homes, talks with them about their lives and the life of their country. Shot in 1966, the film is a time capsule of a Nigeria and a Peace Corps both in the rambunctious bloom of youth." Working in the cinéma vérité style of the time, Schickele imbues his deep love for Nigerian culture with brilliant use of local dance and music, along with astonishingly beautiful close-ups of the people he cared so deeply about. Scenes cut by the Peace Corps in the official version are now back in the Pacific Film Archive's 2K scan of Landrum's personal 16mm print. (Note adapted from Milestone Films.) DIR/SCR/PROD David Schickele. U.S., 1966, b&w, 68 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Presented in recognition of Pride Month

Max is looking for love. Her roommate, Kia, already has it in the person of Evy, who lives at home with her mom while still trying to shake off her ex-husband. Then there's Ely, Kia's ex-student, who is seemingly available. Ely shares a place with Daria, the quintessential lesbian about town, constantly in and out of women's beds and hearts. Kia thinks Max would like Ely; Daria thinks Ely should like Max. Everyone schemes. We're treated to a date, a dinner party, pride, honor, friendship, laundry, nail clipping — and, of course, sex. Rose Troche's debut feature serves as an insider view of lesbian life in the '90s, crafted by a creative team as skillful at portraying angst as irony. Dubbed upon its release as a queer SLACKER for its low-budget, black-and-white chronicling of daily hopes, fears and banalities, GO FISH begins where coming-out films used to end: all the women are gay, and sex is on everybody's mind. At once gritty and lyrical, it tracks an interlinked cast of characters through a fanciful girl-meets-girl saga. (Note courtesy of the Sundance Film Festival.) DIR/SCR/PROD Rose Troche; SCR/PROD Guinevere Turner. U.S., 1994, b&w, 83 min. RATED R

Digitally restored by the Academy Film Archive and the UCLA Film & Television Archive in conjunction with the Sundance Institute. Funding provided by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Amazon MGM Studios, Frameline, Sundance Institute and the UCLA Film & Television Archive.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[PUL-IP-DEUL 풀잎들]
Released the same year as HOTEL BY THE RIVER, GRASS takes place almost entirely in one pleasant Seoul café. Kim Min-hee (HOTEL BY THE RIVER, ON THE BEACH AT NIGHT ALONE) stars as Areum, who sits alone, typing on her laptop and eavesdropping on other customers. In typical Hong fashion, we soon become aware that nothing is as straightforward as it appears. Scenes are out of order, and we begin to wonder whether Areum is simply recording the events around her or creating the very fiction we are watching. (Note adapted from the National Museum of Asian Art.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2018, b&w, 66 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Guelwaar" is the nickname of Pierre Henri Thioune (Thierno Ndiaye), a political radical and agitator whose criticism of Senegal's reliance on foreign aid ruffles the feathers of the powers that be. His suspicious death is followed by a farcical mix-up when his corpse is mistaken for that of another man and accidentally interred in an Islamic cemetery. Guelwaar's family, led by Europeanized son Barthelemy (Ndiawar Diop), enlists the local police to unearth and then rebury their paterfamilias on Catholic ground, but Muslim resistance sparks a religious conflict and unleashes long-held hostilities among townspeople and within the Thioune clan. At once a tragicomic study of social atomization and a hopeful vision of Pan-African solidarity and independence, GUELWAAR is Ousmane Sembène's masterclass in interweaving complex storylines and merging disparate stylistic tones. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR/PROD Ousmane Sembène; PROD Jacques Perrin. Senegal, 1992, color, 114 min. In French and Wolof with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

GUN FURY is the one and only 3-D film by veteran filmmaker Raoul Walsh (HIGH SIERRA, WHITE HEAT), though the infamously one-eyed director was never able to see it in its intended stereoscopic format. Rock Hudson stars as Ben Warren, who, along with his fiancée Jennifer Ballard (Donna Reed, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE), is on a stagecoach journey to start a new life in California. But fellow coach rider and disguised outlaw Frank Slayton (Philip Carey, CALAMITY JANE) has other ideas, kidnapping Jennifer and leaving Ben for dead. As Frank and Jennifer change course and head for Mexico, Ben vows revenge and sets off on a dangerous mission to rescue his betrothed. DIR Raoul Walsh; SCR Irving Wallace, Roy Huggins, from the novel "Ten Against Caesar" by K.R.G. Granger; PROD Lewis J. Rachmil. U.S., 1953, color, 83 min. In English and Spanish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

Also part of Columbia Pictures Centennial Retro.

AFI Member passes accepted.

aka HELLO, THAT'S ME [BAREV, YES EM Բարև, ես եմ]
A visionary, playful meditation on identity and fate, Frunze Dovlatyan's HELLO, IT'S ME has been little seen in the West since its 1966 Cannes debut. This new restoration of the film, shot in stunning black-and-white CinemaScope, reveals a masterpiece on par with the greatest Soviet movies of the '60s — and one surprisingly in tune with New Wave sensibilities. Ostensibly, the film is a chronicle of the epic life and career of an accomplished Armenian physicist, Artyom (Armen Dzhigarkhanyan), which includes the loss of his young love, Lyusya (Natalya Fateeva), during World War II, his lonely posting to a remote mountaintop research station and his friendship with an accomplished but ambivalent colleague, Oleg (Rolan Bykov, ANDREI RUBLEV). But Dovlatyan's masterstroke is to de-emphasize the Great Man biographical details and career accomplishments and to instead heighten Artyom's romantic and erotic yearnings, especially in the person of his new love, Tanya (Margarita Terekhova, in her screen debut, later to headline Andrei Tarkovsky's MIRROR), with whom Artyom feels a near-mystical connection. DIR Frunze Dovlatyan; SCR Arnold Agababov. USSR, 1965, b&w, 137 min. In Armenian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Pro boxer, amateur pilot and terrible saxophonist Joe Pendelton (Robert Montgomery, in a role originally conceived for Cary Grant) crashes his plane and perishes right before a big fight. But it turns out his death was an afterlife-employee mix-up, and he was supposed to remain on Earth for another 50 years. To make matters worse, his body is cremated before the error can be rectified, so boss-angel Mr. Jordan (Claude Rains) takes him on a madcap search to find a sporty new body, and, along the way, working-class Joe encounters crooked business dealings, scheming wives and unexpected romance. This comedy/fantasy delight, winner of two Academy Awards® (for Best Story and Adapted Screenplay), was later remade as HEAVEN CAN WAIT by Warren Beatty and Buck Henry, replacing boxing with football. DIR Alexander Hall; SCR Sidney Buchman, Seton I. Miller, based on the novel "Heaven Can Wait" by Harry Segall; PROD Everett Riskin. U.S., 1941, b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[GANGBYUN HOTEL 강변 호텔]
Hong Sangsoo's 23rd feature follows two interconnected storylines set in and around a quiet hotel in winter. In one, an aging poet (Ki Joo-bong) is visited by his estranged adult sons. In the other, a young woman (Kim Min-hee, GRASS, ON THE BEACH AT NIGHT ALONE), with an unexplained wound on her hand, holes up with a friend to recover from a bad breakup. HOTEL BY THE RIVER prompted Giovanna Fulvi of the Toronto International Film Festival to enthuse, "Hong Sangsoo possesses a singular mastery for blending the mundane with the cosmic and the minutiae of human foibles with ageless queries into the riddles of time's passage." (Note courtesy of the National Museum of Asian Art.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2018, b&w, 96 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Nancy Savoca's star-studded indie gem is a chronicle of a spirited Italian American New York family that expertly balances humor, tragedy and pathos. Joseph Santangelo (Vincent D'Onofrio) is a butcher with a wicked sense of humor who "wins" Catherine (a stellar Tracey Ullman) in a pinochle game. Over the protests of his mother (Judith Malina), who talks to ghosts and makes deals with saints, Joseph marries Catherine. When the old lady dies, her spirit is channeled into her granddaughter Teresa, who overtakes the film with her yearning to serve God. Perfectly embodying a modern-day Bernadette, Lili Taylor imbues Teresa with a mix of dedicated innocence and naïveté. Executive produced by Jonathan Demme and with memorable performances from Michael Imperioli, Michael Rispoli and Victor Argo, HOUSEHOLD SAINTS showcases a unique voice in 1990s independent filmmaking. (Note adapted from Kino Lorber.) DIR/SCR Nancy Savoca, from the novel by Francine Prose; SCR/PROD Richard Guay; PROD Peter Newman. U.S., 1993, color, 125 min. RATED R

Digitally restored and remastered by Lightbox Film Center at University of the Arts (Philadelphia) in collaboration with Milestone Films, with support from Ron and Suzanne Naples. Restoration Supervisor: Ross Lipman, Corpus Fluxus. Picture Restoration: Illuminate Hollywood. Sound Restoration: Audio Mechanics.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[J'AI ÉTÉ AU BAL]
I WENT TO THE DANCE is the seminal film on the history of the foot-stomping, toe-tapping music of French Southwest Louisiana, featuring Cajun and Zydeco greats Michael Doucet, BeauSoleil, Clifton Chenier, Canray Fontenot, Marc and Ann Savoy, D.L. Menard, Boozoo Chavis and many more. Newly restored in 5K, Les Blank, Chris Strachwitz and Maureen Gosling's celebratory film brims with tender affection for its subjects, the vitality of their marvelous music and a generosity of spirit. (Note adapted from Argot Pictures.) DIR Les Blank, Maureen Gosling; DIR/PROD Chris Strachwitz. U.S., 1989, color, 84 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Dixon Steele (Humphrey Bogart), a cynical, violent-tempered Hollywood screenwriter headed toward has-been status, becomes the prime suspect in the brutal murder of a young woman. His personal and professional lives take a dramatic turn when he falls in love with his alibi — Laurel Gray (Gloria Grahame), a vulnerable new neighbor in his apartment court. An emotionally authentic and mature film about the frailty of human relationships and the glory and agony of artistic temperament. (Note adapted from Noir City.) DIR Nicholas Ray; SCR Edmund H. North, Andrew Solt, from the novel by Dorothy B. Hughes; PROD Robert Lord. U.S., 1950, b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Truman Capote's masterful 1966 true-crime novelization was miraculously translated to an equally masterful movie in the hands of the uncompromising Richard Brooks. Nominated for four Academy Awards® — Best Director, Original Score, Cinematography and Adapted Screenplay — the film, which recounts the events surrounding the brutal murder of a family of four in small-town Kansas during a home robbery gone wrong and the subsequent search for and interrogation of the two culprits, remains one of the go-to docufiction crime movies. To achieve its raw authenticity, IN COLD BLOOD even went so far as refusing to cast distracting big stars for the lead villains (a smart choice as Robert Blake and Scott Wilson are chillingly perfect) and shooting in actual locales whenever possible. A tour de force of cinematic storytelling, heightened further by Conrad Hall's stunning black-and-white camerawork and Quincy Jones' jazzy score. DIR/SCR/PROD Richard Brooks, from the novel by Truman Capote. U.S., 1967, b&w, 134 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[IN DEN GÄNGEN]
When the reclusive Christian (Franz Rogowski, TRANSIT) takes a job working the night shift at a big-box store, his new manager, Bruno from the Beverage Department (Peter Kurth, BABYLON BERLIN), teaches him the lay of the land and the delicacy it takes to operate a forklift. Christian becomes enamored by his charming but mysterious co-worker "Sweets Marion" (Sandra Hüller, ANATOMY OF A FALL, THE ZONE OF INTEREST, TONI ERDMANN), with whom he begins to share flirtatious break-room coffees and conversations. But Marion has secrets of her own, and when she suddenly goes on sick leave, Christian is tempted to fall into habits of his dark past. An affecting and bittersweet glimpse into the shared connections of a motley group of workers, IN THE AISLES quietly celebrates the beauty in the day-to-day and the collective pride we take in our jobs with dark humor and nuance. (Note courtesy of Music Box Films.) DIR/SCR Thomas Stuber; SCR Clemens Meyer, from his short story; PROD Jochen Laube, Fabian Maubach. Germany, 2018, color, 125 min. In German with English subtitles. NOT RATED

Co-presented by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University.

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

Harrison Ford returns to the role of the legendary hero archaeologist for this highly anticipated final installment of the iconic franchise — a big, globe-trotting, rip-roaring cinematic adventure. Thrust again into a challenge that tests his strength, as well as his patience, Indiana Jones (Ford) risks everything to keep an ancient dial that could change the course of history from those who want the device for their own personal gain. With a stellar cast that includes Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Antonio Banderas, John Rhys-Davies, Toby Jones and Mads Mikkelsen, INDIANA JONES AND THE DIAL OF DESTINY is a nostalgic thrill ride that provides the perfect dose of escapist popcorn fun — thanks in no small part to a score by the series’ renowned composer, John Williams. (Note adapted from Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.) DIR/SCR James Mangold; SCR Jez Butterworth, John-Henry Butterworth, David Koepp; PROD Simon Emanuel, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall. U.S., 2023, color, 154 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

With 40 years of making music as the iconic folk-rock band Indigo Girls, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers have made their mark as musicians, songwriters and dedicated activists. They have represented radical self-acceptance to many, leading multiple generations of fans to say, "The Indigo Girls saved my life." Still, Amy and Emily battled misogyny, homophobia and a harsh cultural climate chastising them for not fitting into a female pop star mold. With joy, humor and heartwarming earnestness, Sundance award–winning director Alexandria Bombach brings us into a contemporary conversation with Amy and Emily — alongside decades of the band's home movies and intimate present-day vérité. DIR/PROD Alexandria Bombach; PROD Kathlyn Horan, Jess Devaney, Anya Rous. U.S., color, 123 min. NOT RATED

[INDAGINE SU UN CITTADINO AL DI SOPRA DI OGNI SOSPETTO]
This pitch-black psychological thriller from writer/director Elio Petri (THE 10TH VICTIM) won the 1970 Foreign Language Film Oscar®, and Petri and Ugo Pirro were also nominated for their original screenplay. Gian Maria Volonté (A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS) stars as a police inspector who murders his mistress and flaunts his guilt to demonstrate his untouchable power. INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN ABOVE SUSPICION was the second of six films Ennio Morricone scored for Petri, and his droll, quirky music expertly evokes the inspector's twisted psyche. (Note courtesy of the Academy Museum.) DIR/SCR Elio Petri; SCR Ugo Pirro; PROD Marina Cicogna, Daniele Senatore. Italy, 1970, color, 115 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

This enduring cult classic is best remembered for its groundbreaking stop-motion animation and special-effects wizard Ray Harryhausen's work in bringing to life a menagerie of fantastic beasts and frightening monsters, most memorably the skeleton warriors. Bernard Herrmann's rousing score is replete with brassy fanfares, martial drums and enchanting harp workouts. DIR Don Chaffey; SCR Beverley Cross, Jan Read, from the poem "The Argonautica" by Apollonius Rhodius; PROD Charles H. Schneer. UK/U.S., 1963, color, 104 min. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

Drifter Jubal Troop (Glenn Ford) stumbles into gainful employment with kindly rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine), only to incur the jealous wrath of the egomaniacal, Iago-esque ranch foreman Pinky (Rod Steiger) and the unwanted attentions of his boss' wife Mae (Valerie French). Delmer Daves' psychologically acute drama is a Western reimagining of "Othello," set in a mountain valley of the majestic Grand Tetons, with cinematography by Charles Lawton, Jr. (THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI, 3:10 TO YUMA). DIR/SCR Delmer Daves; SCR Russell S. Hughes, from the novel "Jubal Troop" by Paul Wellman; PROD William Fadiman. U.S., 1956, 100 min. NOT RATED

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[L'ANNÉE DERNIÈRE À MARIENBAD]
"Haven't we met somewhere before?" an urbane man (Giorgio Albertazzi) asks a stunning woman (Delphine Seyrig) during a chic gathering at a baroque château. And he keeps asking her, politely but persistently, throughout the mansion's plush interiors, its mirrored walls and marble statuary, across the game tables of its casino, and outdoors in the mazelike garden that warps space like a Giorgio de Chirico painting. Their question-and-answer games play out through increasingly dreamlike sequences and disorienting segues, jumping back and forth in time, the man pushing for seduction and the woman seeming to bend — or is it the other way around? In her first leading role, Seyrig looks gorgeous styled in Coco Chanel, who later advertised her signature fragrance in a memorable 1980s television commercial inspired by the film. DIR Alain Resnais; SCR Alain Robbe-Grillet; PROD Pierre Courau, Raymond Froment. France/Italy, 1961, b&w, 94 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

4K restoration from the original negative by Studiocanal at Hiventy laboratory, with the support of CNC and Chanel.

AFI Member passes accepted.

A production as troubled as its characters, Robert Rossen's moody, often misunderstood final film follows ex-soldier Vincent (Warren Beatty), who secures work as an occupational therapist trainee at the local mental institution in Rockville, MD. There, he falls under the spell of a patient — and he's not the only one. Lilith (Jean Seberg) enchants all those around her with her exceptional beauty and intelligence. It may be easy to forget why she's there, but her sanity is far from intact, and Vincent's own state of mind becomes increasingly fragile as he gets in deeper. A great actor's director (see ALL THE KING'S MEN, also screening in this series, and THE HUSTLER), Rossen elicits superb performances from Beatty, supporting players Peter Fonda, Gene Hackman, Kim Hunter and especially Seberg in the haunting title role. DIR/SCR/PROD Robert Rossen, from the novel by J.R. Salamanca. U.S., 1964, b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

[L'AMOUR EN FUITE]
At its U.S. premiere as part of a 1979 career retrospective at the AFI Theater in the Kennedy Center, François Truffaut described his film as a recapitulation and the conclusion of the Antoine Doinel cycle. Twenty years after THE 400 BLOWS, Antoine (Jean Pierre Léaud) remains an adolescent at heart. In the week following his divorce from Christine, he relives his former affairs, meeting in turn his ex-wife (Claude Jade), his first unhappy love (Marie-France Pisier, who co-scripted) and his tough-minded mistress (Dani), as well as an odd fellow, Monsieur Lucien (Julien Bertheau), who was the lover of Antoine's mother. A shamelessly happy ending throws Antoine into the arms of new love Sabine (Dorothée). DIR/SCR/PROD François Truffaut; SCR Jean Aurel, Marie-France Pisier, Suzanne Schiffman. France, 1979, color/b&w, 95 min. In French with English subtitles. RATED PG

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A down-on-her-luck young woman gets a lift from a footloose wanderer in this romantic Depression-era delight. Bill (Spencer Tracy) lives by his wits, but not by conventional codes of behavior, as he romances a showgirl (Glenda Farrell) while shacking up with Trina (Loretta Young) — literally shacking, in a Hooverville on the shores of the Hudson River. There's plenty of pre-Code naughtiness, but director Frank Borzage goes to such extremes for exploration, not exploitation, lending "an aura to his characters, not merely through soft focus and a fluid camera, but through a genuine concern with the wondrous inner life of lovers in the midst of adversity." – Andrew Sarris. DIR Frank Borzage; SCR Jo Swerling, from the play by Lawrence Hazard. U.S., 1933, b&w, 75 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This American labor classic is based on the 1920 showdown between West Virginia coal miners and coal company agents hired to prevent them from unionizing. As organizer Joe Kenehan (Chris Cooper, in his film debut) explains, "They got you fightin' white against colored, native against foreign, hollow against hollow, when you know there ain't but two sides in this world — them that work and them that don't. You work, they don't. That's all you got to know about the enemy." The cast includes James Earl Jones, Mary McDonnell, David Strathairn and Will Oldham; with Oscar®-nominated cinematography by Haskell Wexler. (Note courtesy of Rochester Labor Film Series.) DIR/SCR John Sayles; PROD Peggy Rajski, Maggie Renzi. U.S., 1987, color, 135 min. RATED PG-13

Co-presented by UMWA (United Mine Workers of America), Metro DC Democratic Socialists of America, the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University and the Claudia Jones School for Political Education.

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

A visual punch line in Woody Allen's ANNIE HALL — Alvy Singer's suspicions about a sinister L.A. lurking beneath the shiny surface are confirmed by a theater marquee running this film — MESSIAH OF EVIL is fascinatingly of its time. Made on the cheap by Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz (Oscar®-nominated for the screenplay to George Lucas' AMERICAN GRAFITTI, their other 1973 release), USC film school grads steeped in American counterculture and European New Wave cinema, the frankly confusing story (extensively reworked in the editing) about flesh-eating zombies in a coastal California town and the prophesied return of a satanic figure, the Dark Stranger, is short on genuine scares but long on bizarre atmosphere. Legendary production designer Jack Fisk and frequent Terrence Malick editor Billy Weber received some of their first screen credits here, as did future writer/director/producer Walter Hill, making his lone appearance as an actor to date. DIR/SCR/PROD Willard Huyck, Gloria Katz. U.S., 1973, color, 90 min. RATED R

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Warren Beatty plays a hapless nightclub comedian in trouble with the mob who, along with his girlfriend (Alexandra Stewart), tries to stay one step ahead of trouble by keeping on the move through Chicago's seediest locales, hustled along by Eddie Sauter's jazz score (featuring Stan Getz). Ambitiously conceived by Arthur Penn, the puzzled reception that greeted the film's release would cause him to contemplate quitting movies — until Beatty wooed him back a few years later to collaborate on BONNIE AND CLYDE. DIR/PROD Arthur Penn; SCR Alan Surgal. U.S., 1965, b&w, 93 min. NOT RATED

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Intro by Art Deco Society of Washington’s Steve Knight and Karen Burditt, who will discuss the film’s legacy and its Art Deco architectural star, the Los Angeles Coliseum – the 1923 Streamline Moderne stadium that helped put Los Angeles on the map of great American cities.

In the mythical land of Klopstockia, all the women are called Angela, everyone's a world-class athlete and W.C. Fields is the unnamed weight-lifting president. The small, nearly bankrupt country is also populated with zanies played by Jack Oakie, Hugh Herbert, Ben Turpin and Lyda Roberti. Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who later wrote ALL ABOUT EVE, came up with the original story inspired by the fervor surrounding the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics. DIR Edward Cline; SCR Nick Barrows, Henry Myers. U.S., 1932, b&w, 64 min. NOT RATED

Co-presented with Art Deco Society of Washington in celebration of Art Deco Month

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About Art Deco Society of Washington
The Art Deco Society of Washington (ADSW) is a nonprofit organization incorporated to foster awareness, preservation and appreciation of the Art Deco period in the Washington, DC, area. For more information, visit adsw.org.

Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp gets trapped in the coils of automation — at one point literally — so frenziedly tightening screws on the assembly line that, once off it, he compulsively tightens buttons on women and later becomes the guinea pig for an efficiency-promoting feeding machine run amok. Inspired by René Clair's À NOUS LA LIBERTÉ, this corrosive satire on the dehumanizing effects of technology gives its screeches, groans and grinds more lines than the actors. It's also one of Chaplin's most lighthearted works, with highlights including his helpful waving of a red flag dropped by a departing truck just as a Communist demonstration marches up behind him. DIR/SCR/PROD Charlie Chaplin. U.S., 1936, b&w, 87 min. NOT RATED

Co-presented by Metro DC Democratic Socialists of America.

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

When the bureaucratic buildup of World War II creates a housing shortage in Washington, DC, government worker Connie Milligan (Jean Arthur) advertises for a female roommate. Unable to check into his hotel when he arrives in town, millionaire Benjamin Dingle (Charles Coburn) charms and flimflams his way into Connie's spacious apartment, where he's flummoxed by her regimented routines and rules and unimpressed by her wet-blanket fiancé Charles (Richard Gaines). So Dingle sublets half of his space to a handsome sergeant, Joe Carter (Joel McCrea), with matchmaking in mind. Director George Stevens works magic with the cramped quarters and stellar performances, and the effervescent comedy earned six Oscar® nominations, including Best Picture and Best Actress for Arthur, with Coburn winning Best Supporting Actor. DIR/PROD George Stevens; SCR Richard Flournoy, Lewis R. Foster, Frank Ross, Robert Russell. U.S., 1943, b&w, 104 min. NOT RATED

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[MADEO]
After he propelled the creature feature to new heights with THE HOST, Bong Joon Ho returned to small-town intrigue with this searing melodrama that also functions as a female-fronted whodunit. Convinced that her son has been wrongly accused of a young girl's murder, a widow throws herself body and soul into proving his innocence. As damning a critique on class and corruption as MEMORIES OF MURDER, MOTHER also stands out in Bong's filmography as a laser-focused character study — veteran actress Kim Hye-ja gives perhaps the performance of her career — that's as heart-rending, thrilling, uncomfortably funny and thoroughly unpredictable as anything he's ever made. (Note courtesy of Film at Lincoln Center.) DIR/SCR Bong Joon Ho; SCR Park Eun-kyo; PROD Moon Yang-kwon, Park Tae-joon, Seo Woo-sik. South Korea, 2009, color, 129 min. In Korean with English subtitles. RATED R

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Gary Cooper stars as Longfellow Deeds, an unassuming man-child in Mandrake Falls, VT, who finds himself at the center of a media storm when he inherits a fortune. Whisked off to New York City, he's beset by scheming lawyers and scandal-mongering journalists — including broadsheet columnist Babe Bennett (Jean Arthur), undercover as meek Mary Dawson to get close to Deeds and dig up some dirt. Shaken by the city slickers' mean spirits, greed and duplicity, Deeds relies on his decency, horse sense and homespun homilies to carry the day. This film earned Frank Capra the second of his three Best Director Oscars®. DIR/PROD Frank Capra; SCR Robert Riskin, from a story by Clarence Budington Kelland. U.S., 1936, b&w, 115 min. NOT RATED

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aka CURSE OF THE DEMON
Atmospheric and eerie, this beloved and controversial British horror film, directed by the great Jacques Tourneur, has been hailed by critics and cineastes alike as one of the scariest films of all time, praised in songs by Kate Bush and Coil and in Richard O'Brien's soundtrack for THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW. After his British colleague dies under mysterious circumstances, American psychologist Dr. John Holden (Dana Andrews) resolves to continue the investigation of Dr. Julian Karswell (Niall MacGinnis), suspected of murder in the practice of Satanism. Peggy Cummins of GUN CRAZY fame co-stars. DIR Jacques Tourneur; SCR Charles Bennett, Hal E. Chester, from the story "Casting the Runes" by M.R. James; PROD Frank Bevis. UK, 1958, b&w, 95 min. NOT RATED

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Andrei Tarkovsky explained that in Russian the word "nostalghia" conveys "the love for your homeland and the melancholy that arises from being far away." This debilitating form of homesickness is embodied in the film by Andrei (Oleg Yankovsky, THE MIRROR), a Russian intellectual doing research in Italy. He becomes obsessed with the Botticelli-like beauty of his translator Eugenia (Domiziana Giordano), as well as with the apocalyptic ramblings of a self-destructive wanderer named Domenico (Erland Josephson, THE SACRIFICE). Written with frequent Michelangelo Antonioni collaborator Tonino Guerra (L'AVVENTURA) and newly restored in 4K from the original camera negative, NOSTALGHIA is a mystical and mysterious collision of East and West, shot with the tactile beauty that only Tarkovsky can provide. As J. Hoberman wrote, "NOSTALGHIA is not so much a movie as a place to inhabit for two hours." (Note courtesy of Kino Lorber.) DIR/SCR Andrei Tarkovsky; SCR Tonino Guerra; PROD Francesco Casati. USSR/Italy, 1983, color, 125 min. In Russian and Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

Restored in 4K in 2022 by CSC – Cinetecanazionale in collaboration with Rai Cinema at Augustus Color laboratory, from the original negatives and the original soundtrack preserved at Rai Cinema.

AFI Member passes accepted.

In 1976, trailblazing director Martha Coolidge (VALLEY GIRL, RAMBLING ROSE) made her feature debut with the startling NOT A PRETTY PICTURE, a documentary/fiction hybrid that continues to raise provocative questions about sexual violence and the ethics of its on-screen representation. Coolidge based the film's fictional sections on her rape at the age of 16; in the role of her younger self, she cast Michele Manenti, also a rape victim. As they interpret Coolidge's script, cast members reflect on their encounters with assault; their feelings about acting out these scenes of intense aggression; their attitudes concerning consent, trauma and self-blame; and, in the case of Coolidge's best friend, Anne Mundstuk, their ability to play themselves. Realizing documentary's potential to foster catharsis and interpersonal dialogue, NOT A PRETTY PICTURE stands as one of the genre's boldest and most revelatory experiments in metacinema. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR/PROD Martha Coolidge. U.S., 1976, color, 83 min. NOT RATED

Digitally restored in 4K from original 16mm elements in 2022 by the Academy Film Archive and The Film Foundation. Restoration funding was provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

AFI Member passes accepted.

Set against the stirrings of the civil rights movement and a rising wave of burgeoning Black pride, NOTHING BUT A MAN tells the story of Duff (Ivan Dixon, who went on to direct 1973's THE SPOOK WHO SAT BY THE DOOR), a railroad section hand who is forced to confront racial prejudice and self-denial when he falls in love with Josie (Abbey Lincoln), an educated preacher's daughter. Called "one of the most sensitive films about black life ever made in this country" (The Washington Post), the film explores the painful nuances of life in the 1960s South, and themes of fatherhood and sacrifice. (Note adapted from Cinema Conservancy.) DIR/SCR/PROD Michael Roemer; SCR/PROD Robert M. Young; PROD Robert Rubin. U.S., 1964, b&w, 95 min. NOT RATED

Restored by Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation.

In Memoriam: Robert M. Young (1924-2024)

AFI Member passes accepted.

"I could burn this place down." The perennial DC Labor FilmFest favorite OFFICE SPACE returns for its 25th anniversary! Ron Livingston, Ajay Naidu and David Herman star as three disgruntled workers at the dreary, fluorescent-lit office of Initech who learn of impending layoffs at the company and hatch a scheme to embezzle from their greedy bosses; co-starring Jennifer Aniston, Stephen Root, Gary Cole, John C. McGinley and Diedrich Bader. Director Mike Judge's theatrical debut was largely ignored upon release but has become a veritable ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW for cube-farmers everywhere. DIR/SCR/PROD Mike Judge; PROD Daniel Rappaport, Michael Rotenberg. U.S., 1999, color, 89 min. RATED R

Co-presented by Nonprofit Professional Employees Union (NPEU) - IFPTE Local 70 and Power At Work .

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

Hailed visionary Bong Joon Ho returns with a typically twisted, vegetarian blockbuster about a friendship between a little girl (Ahn Seo-hyun) and her superpig. This anti-corporate satire follows their fight against a villainous corporation led by Tilda Swinton, who plays both a hypocrite CEO and her scheming twin sister. Friends and foes are a cadre of equally quirky people, including a courteous eco-terrorist played by Paul Dano, and Jake Gyllenhaal as a kind of Sir Attenborough from hell. DIR/SCR/PROD Bong Joon Ho; SCR Jon Ronson; PROD Dooho Choi, Dede Gardner, Lewis Taewan Kim, Jeremy Kleiner, Ted Sarandos, Seo Woo-sik. South Korea/U.S., 2017, color, 120 min. In English and Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[BAMUI HAEBYEONESEO HONJA 밤의 해변에서 혼자]
Longtime Hong Sangsoo collaborator Kim Min-hee (HOTEL BY THE RIVER) won the Best Actress award at the 2017 Berlin International Film Festival for her soulful performance in this romantic dramedy. She plays Young-hee, a famous actress who, during a self-imposed exile in Hamburg and then with the help of hard-drinking friends back home, grapples with the end of her affair with an older, married film director. In fact, Hong and Kim's real-life affair was tabloid fodder in Korea. This cinematic response from two accomplished artists is one of Hong's most elegantly structured and emotionally heartfelt achievements — a moving reflection on regret, loneliness and the fleeting power of love. (Note courtesy of the National Museum of Asian Art.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2017, color, 101 min. In Korean, English and German with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA [C'ERA UNA VOLTA IN AMERICA] - Extended Director's Cut
Sergio Leone's visionary epic of the American Dream follows the uneasy friendship of Noodles and Max (Robert De Niro and James Woods) across the 20th century, starting off as two knockabout Jewish kids on New York's Lower East Side in the 1920s, then enterprising bootleggers in the '30s, but ultimately estranged by their clashing personalities and the consequences of their criminal lifestyle, until an awkward reunion in the late '60s, where they discover that no matter the reinventions in their lives, there are still old scores to settle. The film was infamously cut by some 90 minutes when released in 1984, but this recent restoration overseen by The Film Foundation is the most complete version yet. Scored by Ennio Morricone, ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA also features star turns by Jennifer Connelly, Elizabeth McGovern, Tuesday Weld, Treat Williams, Burt Young, Joe Pesci and Danny Aiello. DIR/SCR Sergio Leone; SCR Franco Arcalli, Leonardo Benvenuti, Piero De Bernardi, Franco Ferrini, Enrico Medioli, from the novel "The Hoods" by Harry Grey; PROD Arnon Milchan. U.S./Italy, 1984, color, 266 min. incl. one 15-min. intermission. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[C'ERA UNA VOLTA IL WEST]
Henry Fonda's ice-blue eyes are those of a cold-blooded killer in Sergio Leone's epic Western. The actor memorably plays against type as Frank, a hired gun for a ruthless railroad magnate, who is sent to scare off a local landowner possessing valuable land but instead sadistically slaughters the man and his family. Doggedly trailing Frank is the mysterious Harmonica (Charles Bronson), a dazzling gunfighter with a very personal agenda. Adapted from a story by Leone, Dario Argento and Bernardo Bertolucci, the film also features Claudia Cardinale and Jason Robards, vivid Techniscope cinematography by Tonino Delli Colli and a typically masterful score by Ennio Morricone. DIR/SCR Sergio Leone; SCR Sergio Donati; PROD Fulvio Morsella. U.S./Italy, 1968, color, 166 min. In English, Spanish and Italian with English subtitles. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Bong Joon Ho brought his singular mastery home to Korea in this pitch-black modern fairytale. Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide "indispensable" luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household. When a parasitic interloper threatens the Kims' newfound comfort, a savage, underhanded battle for dominance breaks out, threatening to destroy the fragile ecosystem between the Kims and the Parks. By turns darkly hilarious and heart-wrenching, PARASITE showcases a modern master at the top of his game. DIR/SCR/PROD Bong Joon Ho; SCR Han Jin-won; PROD Jang Young-Hwan, Moon Yang-kwon, Kwak Sin-ae. South Korea, 2019, color, 132 min. In English and Korean with English subtitles. RATED R

In Memoriam: Lee Sun-kyun (1975—2023)

AFI Member passes accepted.

A scandal when it was released in 1960, PEEPING TOM was critically vilified and seriously damaged the career of director Michael Powell. It has since become both a cult classic and the subject of serious academic consideration. An icy Carl Boehm stars as an aspiring filmmaker who shoots pretty girls for his "documentary" on the nature of fear, using his tricked-out camera that can kill even as it films. Anna Massey plays the downstairs neighbor with whom he begins a tentative friendship. The psychologically acute screenplay is from World War II cryptographer and polymath Leo Marks. DIR/PROD Michael Powell; SCR Leo Marks. UK, 1960, color, 101 min. NOT RATED

Restored by The Film Foundation and BFI National Archive in association with Studiocanal. Funding provided by The Film Foundation and Studiocanal. Special thanks to Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker for their consultation. 4K scanning by Silver Salt Restoration Limited, London; picture restoration by Cineric, Inc., New York; audio restoration by BFI National Archive.

AFI Member passes accepted.

"More magnificent than you ever dreamed…Quite an attraction." Brian De Palma's 1974 rock opera PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE remains a connoisseur's cult classic, 50 years after its release. Disfigured composer Winslow Leach (William Finley) seeks revenge on Swan (Paul Williams), the heartless producer who stole his music, which Leach wrote for Phoenix (Jessica Harper), the woman he loves from afar. Williams' wicked rock music powers Brian De Palma's outré musical, which combines elements of Gaston Leroux's "The Phantom of the Opera," Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and Goethe's "Faust." DIR/SCR Brian De Palma; PROD Edward R. Pressman. U.S., 1974, color, 92 min. RATED PG

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It's Labor Day weekend, and a happy-go-lucky drifter (William Holden) is fresh off a freight train and looking for a brand-new start in life. A robust, handsome show-off, he has come to Kansas to seek work in the family granary of his old fraternity brother (Cliff Robertson). But despite high hopes and expectations, these ambitious plans soon go awry when his sexual magnetism attracts every woman in town, including an alluring young beauty queen (Kim Novak), who just happens to be his fraternity brother's girlfriend. Also starring Rosalind Russell, Arthur O'Connell, Susan Strasberg and Nick Adams, PICNIC was nominated for six Academy Awards®: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor for O'Connell, Best Music, Best Color Art Direction and Best Editing. (Note adapted from Sony Pictures.) DIR Joshua Logan; SCR Daniel Taradash, from the play by William Inge; PROD Fred Kohlmar. U.S., 1956, color, 115 min. NOT RATED

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College-football-quarterback-turned-FBI-agent Johnny Utah (Keanu Reeves) is tasked with going undercover in the Southern California surfing community to bust "The Ex-Presidents," a gang suspected of robbing banks while wearing president masks, led by the charismatic Bodhi (Patrick Swayze). This stylish, high-adrenaline action/thriller from Kathryn Bigelow (THE HURT LOCKER, ZERO DARK THIRTY) was a massive hit in its day and is an enduring cult classic. DIR Kathryn Bigelow; SCR W. Peter Iliff; PROD Peter Abrams, Robert L. Levy. U.S., 1991, color, 122 min. RATED R

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"You're tearin' me apart!" wails James Dean as Jim Stark in Nicholas Ray's touchstone of teen angst and nobody-understands-me melodrama, an Eisenhower-era anticipation of the even sharper generational rift to come in the 1960s. Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo give breakout performances as troubled suburban teens Judy and Plato, who, like Jim, are badly in need of real friendship. Ray's sensitive direction, dynamic storytelling and brilliant use of WarnerColor and the CinemaScope frame have ensured that this film has remained alive and vital across multiple generations. "Few films have examined the confusions of an entire generation with such fervor or insight...it remains for many the American movie of the 1950s." – Geoff Andrew, "The Films of Nicholas Ray." DIR/SCR Nicholas Ray; SCR Stewart Stern, Irving Shulman; PROD David Weisbart. U.S., 1955, color, 111 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

For his first film in the aftermath of Japan's defeat in World War II, Yasujirō Ozu chose this story set in a poor neighborhood of Tokyo's backstreets, whose inhabitants eke out a living performing manual labor, odd jobs and street peddling. One night, a seven-year-old boy, Kōhei (Hōhi Aoki), follows Tashiro (Chishū Ryū) home. Separated from, and perhaps abandoned by, his father after traveling from their town to Tokyo in search of work, Kōhei is assigned to the home of cantankerous widow O-tane (Chōko Iida). At first, O-tane resents being stuck with the boy but slowly begins to care for him. Ozu displays a deft comic touch with the material, and though he eschews overt sentimentality, the film still packs a surprising emotional punch. Ultimately, this specific tale of one lost child gives way to a portrait of an entire city trying to rebuild itself and its social fabric. DIR/SCR Yasujirō Ozu; SCR Tadao Ikeda; PROD Mitsuzô Kubo. Japan, 1947, b&w, 72 min. In Japanese with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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REVOLVER (1973) aka BLOOD IN THE STREETS
After making an acclaimed triptych of political Spaghetti Westerns (THE BIG GUNDOWN, FACE TO FACE and RUN, MAN, RUN), Sergio Sollima returned his focus to poliziotteschi films (violent, action-packed Italian crime thrillers that were exceedingly popular at the time) — and REVOLVER is among the gems of the genre. Kidnappers snatch the wife of Milan's top prison warden (Oliver Reed) and demand the release of an inmate (Fabio Testi) as ransom. But when the warden allows his prisoner to escape, the two become trapped in a deadly conspiracy that reaches from the halls of government to the bullet-riddled city streets. "Makes DEATH WISH look like wishful thinking!" was the film's tagline upon its U.S. release (for which it was retitled BLOOD IN THE STREETS), but REVOLVER — as to be expected from Sollima — is much more complex. The film also boasts a propulsive score by Ennio Morricone, including one of his most beloved compositions, "Un Amico," which Quentin Tarantino later adopted for INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS. (Note adapted from Eureka Entertainment.) DIR/SCR Sergio Sollima; SCR Massimo De Rita, Arduino Maiuri; PROD Ugo Santalucia. Italy/West Germany/France, 1973, color, 109 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED R

DCP courtesy of Movetime.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[SACCO E VANZETTI]
The notorious 1920 trial of Italian immigrant anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, long considered a dark chapter of civil injustice and xenophobia in U.S. history, was ambitiously recounted — and embellished — by Giuliano Montaldo in this Italo-French co-production, not by chance filmed in Ireland with a cast that included Cyril Cusack and Milo O'Shea to draw parallels to The Troubles afflicting that nation. Amplifying this was Ennio Morricone's rousing score, with Joan Baez contributing the film's title ballad and her strident song "Here's to You" ("Here's to you, Nicola and Bart/Rest forever here in our hearts"), which very quickly became an anthem for human rights everywhere, only to be repurposed as the theme of a documentary about Germany's Red Army Faction and the popular video game "Metal Gear." (Note courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.) DIR/SCR Giuliano Montaldo; SCR Ottavio Jemma, Fabrizio Onofri; PROD Arrigo Colombo, Giorgio Papi. Italy/France, 1971, color, 125 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED PG

4K DCP restored by Cineteca di Bologna, courtesy of Cinecittà.

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[SALÒ O LE 120 GIORNATE DI SODOMA]
The notorious final film from Pier Paolo Pasolini, SALÒ, OR THE 120 DAYS OF SODOM, has been called nauseating, shocking, depraved, pornographic — but it's also a masterpiece. The controversial poet, novelist and filmmaker's transposition of the Marquis de Sade's 18th-century opus of torture and degradation to Fascist Italy in 1944 — a year before Mussolini's death and the end of World War II — remains one of the most passionately debated films of all time, a thought-provoking inquiry into the political, social and sexual dynamics that define the world we live in. Having just collaborated with Pasolini on his life-affirming, lewdly humorous Trilogy of Life (THE DECAMERON, THE CANTERBURY TALES, ARABIAN NIGHTS), Ennio Morricone turned his attention to scoring those films' antithesis, famously using his arrangement of the upbeat "Son Tanto Triste" to bookend SALÒ's horror, adding an incongruent joviality that only deepens its chilling disquiet. (Note adapted from The Criterion Collection.) DIR/SCR Pier Paolo Pasolini, from the novel by the Marquis de Sade; SCR Sergio Citti; PROD Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/France, 1975, color, 117 min. In Italian, French and German with English subtitles. NOT RATED, but comparable to RATED R and viewer discretion is strongly advised.

AFI Member passes accepted.

A dazzling example of frame-filling Cinemascope mastery. Frontierswoman Milly (Jane Powell) falls for backwoodsman Adam (Howard Keel), even if he still needs a little civilizing. But his six brothers really need work, as they decide to forgo courtship of local women and kidnap prospective brides instead. Five Oscar® nominations, including a win for the Gene de Paul/Johnny Mercer score, but the vigorous dance numbers, choreographed by Michael Kidd, give the picture great vitality, including the great Barnraising Ballet dance sequences. DIR Stanley Donen; SCR Albert Hackett, Frances Goodrich and Dorothy Kingsley; PROD Jack Cummings. U.S., 1954, color, 102 min. RATED G

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After six years of secretly pining away for her department-store tycoon boss (Melvyn Douglas), his über-effective secretary (Claudette Colbert) makes her play, resulting in a speedy matrimony. But can their domestic dynamic match the fail-safe work one they've established? His homelife is, after all, in total disarray, made up of ineffectual servants, an overbearing sister and a discipline-deprived nine-year-old daughter from a previous marriage. With touches of his famous screwball comedies, Gregory La Cava keeps the fast-talking banter apace throughout, with a firecracker Colbert more than the match for Douglas' drippy businessman, who may not have been worthy of her turning down a livelier suitor and job offer in Paris. DIR/PROD Gregory La Cava; SCR Sidney Buchman. U.S., 1935, b&w, 85 min. NOT RATED

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In the midst of a second Ice Age, the remaining inhabitants of Earth are packed together aboard the Snowpiercer, a supertrain that will continuously circle the globe until the planet is again habitable. No utopian society, however, the train is separated into classes, with the "unwashed masses" relegated to the intolerable caboose while the one-percenters bask in luxury. In response, reluctant hero Curtis (Chris Evans) leads a rebellious charge to the ship's engine room. Based on the French graphic novel "Le Transperceneige," Bong Joon Ho's international production also stars Song Kang Ho, Go Ah-sung, John Hurt, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris, Jamie Bell and Octavia Spencer. (Note courtesy of Film at Lincoln Center.) DIR/SCR Bong Joon Ho; SCR Kelly Masterson, from the graphic novel "Le Transperceneige" by Jacques Lob, Benjamin Legrand and Jean-Marc Rochette; PROD Jeong Tae-sung, Jeong Wonjo, Lee Tae-hun, Steven Nam, Park Chan-wook. South Korea/Czech Republic, 2013, color, 126 min. In English, Korean, French, Japanese, Czech and German with English subtitles. RATED R

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The original that started it all follows Luke Skywalker as he teams with Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi, cocky pilot Han Solo, a Wookiee and two droids to save the galaxy and rescue Princess Leia from the evil Darth Vader. Among the many factors that went into the movie magic of George Lucas' history-making, paradigm-shifting, swashbuckling space adventure were John Williams' heroic fanfares, harkening back to the music of Hollywood's Golden Age. Also, the authoritative screen presence of Alec Guinness, a Best Supporting Actor Oscar® nominee for his iconic turn as Kenobi, leading a cast of young unknowns including Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher. The film won six Oscars®, counting Williams' third statue for Best Original Score. DIR/SCR George Lucas; PROD Gary Kurtz, Rick McCallum. U.S., 1977/1997, color, 121 min. RATED PG

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The cliffhangers and conflicts of STAR WARS: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK are resolved in a most satisfying fashion in the climactic finale to the original STAR WARS saga. Han Solo — frozen in a carbonite coffin! Princess Leia — taken prisoner by Jabba the Hutt, and forced into that Mata Hari–on–Mars metal bikini! Luke Skywalker — the force grows stronger in him, the new hand works fine and his rematch with Darth Vader looms! Ewoks! DIR Richard Marquand; SCR Lawrence Kasdan, George Lucas, from a story by Lucas; PROD Howard G. Kazanjian, Rick McCallum. U.S., 1983/1997, color, 135 min. RATED PG

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With a richer story, more complex themes and a darker tone than STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE, this is the gold standard for blockbuster sequels. Three years after the destruction of the Death Star, the Rebel Alliance is dealt a stunning blow by the evil Empire on the ice planet Hoth. While the Imperial Fleet pursues heroes Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher) and Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew), Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) journeys to the swamp planet Dagobah to train under Jedi Master Yoda. John Williams' Oscar®-nominated score includes the debut of "The Imperial March (Darth Vader's Theme)," now one of the best-known symphonic movie themes of all time, heard everywhere from sporting arenas to phone ringtones. DIR Irvin Kershner; SCR Leigh Brackett, Lawrence Kasdan, from a story by George Lucas; PROD Gary Kurtz, Rick McCallum. U.S., 1980/1997, color, 127 min. RATED PG

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[BAISERS VOLÉS]
Nearly a decade after THE 400 BLOWS — and three years after its follow-up short, ANTOINE AND COLETTE — Truffaut chose to revisit his Antoine Doinel character in a second feature film. Again played by Jean-Pierre Léaud, Antoine is now a shiftless young man, recently discharged from the army and footloose in Paris. As he bumbles through a succession of odd jobs — ranging from shoe salesman to private detective — Léaud displays a unique talent for comic diffidence, culminating in Antoine's courting of a stunning society dame (Delphine Seyrig). DIR/SCR/PROD François Truffaut; SCR Claude de Givray, Bernard Revon; PROD Marcel Berbert. France, 1968, color, 91 min. In French with English subtitles. RATED R

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Domineering society dame Katharine Hepburn enlists psychiatrist Montgomery Clift to perform a lobotomy on her troubled niece Elizabeth Taylor, whom she blames for the death of her beloved son while the two vacationed in Spain. Despite behind-the-scenes turmoil — reports of Hepburn and Taylor at odds over screen time; post-car accident Clift battling personal demons and substance abuse — director Joseph Mankiewicz achieved a mesmerizing adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play, from a screenplay by Williams and Gore Vidal. Oscar® nominations for Hepburn and Taylor, who delivers a spellbinding, climactic monologue about that mysterious summer. DIR Joseph L. Mankiewicz; SCR Gore Vidal, Tennessee Williams, from his play; PROD Sam Spiegel. U.S., 1959, b&w, 114 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

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He led the Apache nation against Geronimo's pillaging hordes! The two sons of Apache leader Cochise (Jeff Chandler) have conflicting views of the white men who trespass on their land. Taza (Rock Hudson) argues for peaceful coexistence, but his younger brother Naiche (Rex Reason, here credited as "Bart Roberts") joins Geronimo (Ian MacDonald) on the warpath. One of the few westerns made in the 1950s that attempted to present a positive view of Native Americans, TAZA, SON OF COCHISE was the second of eight movies that Hudson made with director Douglas Sirk. Filmed on location in Utah, the natural setting of the desert is one of the movie's many assets which is captured by the vivid Technicolor cinematography by the great Russell Metty (SPARTACUS, WRITTEN ON THE WIND). Barbara Rush (MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION, THE FIRST LEGION) costars. (Note adapted from Kino Lorber.) DIR Douglas Sirk; SCR George Zuckerman, Gerald Drayson Adams; PROD Ross Hunter. U.S., 1954, color, 79 min. NOT RATED

3-D restoration by the 3-D Film Archive.

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After Pasolini's fascinating surrealist film won honors at the Venice Film Festival, it was banned on an obscenity charge that was eventually overturned on the basis of the film's "high artistic value." Terence Stamp is the enigmatic stranger who turns the lives of a middle-class family upside down when he seduces each member — including the maid — and then disappears into the night. Silvana Mangano plays the matriarch who loses herself in wanton carnality as she roams the town looking for young men to fill the void once he's gone. Ennio Morricone's superb score mixes dark, edgy, discordant themes with wonderful nods to '60s Italian pop like "Fruscio di foglie verdi" and "Beat n. 3" and the fabulous "L'ultima corrida," which recalls his work on Sergio Leone's Westerns, repurposing the style for a completely new context. DIR/SCR Pier Paolo Pasolini; PROD Manolo Bolognini, Franco Rossellini. Italy, 1968, b&w/color, 98 min. In English and Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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[LES QUATRE CENTS COUPS]
Opening the 1959 Cannes Film Festival represented not only an auspicious beginning for François Truffaut's career but also the beginning of the Nouvelle Vague era of filmmaking that surged forth in its wake. The Paris-set picaresque follows the misadventures of an adolescent boy, Antoine Doinel, good-natured but prone to mischief, who wants to do well in school but plagiarizes Balzac, and who loves his parents but suspects he's not loved back. The film contains autobiographical elements from Truffaut's own rough-and-tumble childhood, but his direction always displays a light touch. With its wit and romance, its moments of elation and sadness and a remarkable, intuitive lead performance by Jean-Pierre Léaud, THE 400 BLOWS remains one of the all-time-great movies about childhood. DIR/SCR/PROD François Truffaut; SCR Marcel Moussy. France, 1959, b&w, 99 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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Young Bart Collins hates taking piano lessons with the strict Dr. Terwilliker. After falling asleep one day while practicing, Bart is transported into a dreamworld where he and 499 other boys are imprisoned at the Terwilliker Institute and forced to play the giant piano of its mad director, Dr. T. The only feature film written by Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss), this musical fantasy was a box-office disappointment, but over time has developed a legion of ardent appreciators. "Refreshingly tart and defiant for a children's film, its space-age-by-way-of-Caligari world parks right on the delicious side of creepy. Bring the kids, especially the smart ones." – Violet Glaze, Baltimore City Paper. DIR Roy Rowland; SCR Dr. Seuss, Allan Scott, from the story by Dr. Seuss; PROD Stanley Kramer. U.S., 1953, color, 90 min. RATED G

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[LA BATTAGLIA DI ALGERI]
Filming on the streets of Algeria documentary-style with a cast of mostly nonprofessional actors, director Gillo Pontecorvo re-created the struggle for independence from the French occupiers so well that a disclaimer had to be added: "Not one foot of newsreel has been used." As the fervor of the community peaks in the film, everyone is implicated in the ongoing warfare, from children to soldiers. One of the most influential political movies of all time, and still relevant today, THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS features a pulsating score by maestro Ennio Morricone and Pontecorvo himself. Winner of the Venice Film Festival Golden Lion; Oscar®-nominated for Best Foreign Language Film, Director and Screenplay. DIR/SCR Gillo Pontecorvo; SCR Franco Solinas; PROD Antonio Musu, Saadi Yasef. Algeria/Italy, 1966, b&w, 121 min. In French and Arabic with English subtitles. NOT RATED

4K digital restoration by Cinecittà and Cineteca di Bologna; courtesy of Cinecittà.

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"Here comes Mr. Ugly." Cool, angular character actor Lee Van Cleef stars in this Spaghetti Western by Sergio Sollima as a sharp-shooting lawman tasked with capturing a man accused of raping and murdering a young girl. The purported criminal, played by Euro-film superstar Tomas Milian in a career-defining role, proves to be smarter than he looks, and the two soon join forces against a corrupt railroad tycoon. A politically charged film co-written by the director and Sergio Donati (ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST) from a story by Franco Solinas (THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS) and Fernando Morandi and featuring a score by legendary composer Ennio Morricone, THE BIG GUNDOWN is a widescreen epic that deserves a seat alongside its more famous peers. DIR/SCR Sergio Sollima; SCR Sergio Donati; PROD Tulio Demicheli, Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/Spain, 1967, color, 110 min/95 min. Dubbed in English/Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

THE BIG GUNDOWN will be presented in two versions:
Fri, April 19, 7:00: the expanded U.S. cut (95 min.) dubbed in English, introduced by George Pelecanos.
Sun, April 21, 4:30: the original Italian cut (110 min) in Italian with English subtitles.

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One of Fritz Lang's best Hollywood films tells the tale of a virtuous cop (Glenn Ford) out for revenge against the gangster who killed his wife. Assisting him in his one-man crusade against the city's corrupt power base is a kooky, sexy dame (Gloria Grahame, in perhaps her signature role) who is out for a little vengeance of her own. Featuring an all-time thuggish turn by a young Lee Marvin, THE BIG HEAT is as compact and compelling as any crime film ever made. (Note courtesy of Film Noir Foundation.) DIR Fritz Lang; SCR Sydney Boehm, from the novel by William P. McGivern; PROD Robert Arthur. U.S., 1953, b&w, 89 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

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[L'UCCELLO DALLE PIUME DI CRISTALLO]
In 1970, young debut director Dario Argento (DEEP RED, SUSPIRIA) indelibly redefined the giallo genre of murder-mystery thrillers with THE BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE, catapulting him to international stardom. Sam (Tony Musante, THE INCIDENT) is an American writer living in Rome who witnesses a brutal attack on a woman (Eva Renzi, FUNERAL IN BERLIN) in an art gallery. Powerless to help, he grows increasingly obsessed with the incident. Convinced he saw something that night that holds the key to identifying the maniac terrorizing Rome, Sam launches his own investigation parallel to that of the police, heedless of the danger to him and his girlfriend (Suzy Kendall, TORSO). A staggeringly assured first feature, the movie establishes the key traits that define Argento's filmography, including lavish visuals and a flair for wildly inventive, brutal scenes of violence. With sumptuous cinematography by Vittorio Storaro (APOCALYPSE NOW) and a seductive Ennio Morricone score, this landmark film has never looked or sounded better. (Note courtesy of American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Dario Argento; PROD Salvatore Argento. Italy/West Germany, 1970, color, 96 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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Humphrey Bogart gives one of his most powerful and surprising performances as Lt. Commander Queeg, the psychologically fragile commanding officer of the U.S.S. Caine during World War II who, exhibiting increasingly erratic behavior, is relieved from his command by his junior officers, played by Van Johnson, Fred MacMurray and Robert Francis. Adapting Herman Wouk's Pulitzer Prize–winning 1951novel, producer Stanley Kramer and director Edward Dmytryk craft an incisive examination of power and its institutions, and the unfolding and resolution of a crisis in leadership. The film's first half aboard the Caine establishes the reality of life on a wartime destroyer minesweeper, while the final acts shift to the court martial hearing against the junior officers accused of mutiny, resulting in one of the screen's all-time-great courtroom dramas. The outstanding cast also includes José Ferrer, Tom Tully and E.G. Marshall; among the enlisted men, look for early appearances by a young Lee Marvin as "Meatball" and Claude Akins as "Horrible." DIR Edward Dmytryk; SCR Stanley Roberts, Michael Blankfort, based on the novel by Herman Wouk; PROD Stanley Kramer. U.S., 1954, color, 124 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[IL GATTO A NOVE CODE]
This second entry in Dario Argento's "Animal Trilogy" (following THE BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE and preceding FOUR FLIES ON GREY VELVET) finds the young talent further refining his distinctive style and cementing his reputation as master of giallo horror. Featuring another nerve-jangling score by the great Ennio Morricone, THE CAT O' NINE TAILS remains one of Argento's most suspenseful and underrated films. When a break-in occurs at a secretive genetics institute, a blind puzzle maker overhears an attempt to blackmail an institute scientist shortly before the robbery and teams up with an intrepid reporter to crack the case. Soon the bodies pile up, and the two amateur sleuths find their own lives at risk in their search for the truth. (Note adapted from American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Dario Argento; PROD Salvatore Argento. Italy/France/West Germany, 1971, color, 112 min. In English and Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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When a military plane crashes in Evans City, Pennsylvania, a mysterious toxin seeps into the water supply, turning the small-town residents into big-time killers. The biological weapon, codenamed "Trixie," leaves its victims either dead or psychologically deranged. Vietnam vet David and his pregnant girlfriend Judy must escape the military-enforced quarantine, the crazed townsfolk and a band of rednecks to get to safety. Five years after NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, George A. Romero crafted another powerful allegory about government cover-ups and conspiracies in the shadow of Watergate and several high-profile environmental disasters. DIR/SCR George Romero; SCR Paul McCollough; PROD A.C. Croft. U.S., 1973, color, 103 min. RATED R

As the classic noir era waned, director Samuel Fuller came out blasting with the first of a series of wildly original crime thrillers. This one starts as a pulpy policier, with a pair of L.A. cops (Glenn Corbett and James Shigeta) hunting the killer of an exotic dancer in Little Tokyo. It twists into a heated romantic triangle, with both cops falling for a key witness (Victoria Shaw). A rare film to explore the Nisei experience in America, it features a compassionate take on the Japanese-born cop's torment at falling for a Caucasian woman. As usual, Fuller's kinetic inspirations sometimes collide with stilted exposition — watch out for flying shrapnel. (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR/SCR/PROD Samuel Fuller. U.S., 1959, b&w, 82 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[DWAEJIGA UMUL-E PPAJIN NAL 돼지가 우물에 빠진 날] Hong Sangsoo's acclaimed feature debut begins as a study of an affair between a temperamental writer (Kim Eui-sung) and a married woman (Lee Eun-kyung), then gradually zooms outward to reveal its tragic ripple effects on the lives of a germophobic businessman (Park Jin-sung) and a young movie-theater ticket-taker (Cho Eun-sook). Though more somber in tone than many of Hong's subsequent seriocomedies, this multistrand drama displays his masterful touch in its unsparing look at the complexities of love (particularly when combined with alcohol) and the heart-tearing void that remains in its absence. (Note courtesy of Film at Lincoln Center.) DIR/SCR Hong Sangsoo; SCR Koo Hyo-seo, Suh Shin-hye; PROD Lee Woo-seok. South Korea, 1996, color, 115 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

[IL DESERTO DEI TARTARI]
The final film directed by Italy's Valerio Zurlini is an oneiric meditation on militarism based on a celebrated 1940 novel by Dino Buzzati. Assigned to a remote desert outpost, the young lieutenant Drogo (Jacques Perrin) anxiously awaits his first encounter with the enemy army. But the enemy never appears. His platoon keeps drilling, and life continues elsewhere, but Drogo and company remain trapped in their fortress. As time passes, their world becomes even more untethered from the wider one. Absent any external enemy, the officers bicker among themselves, soldiers mutiny and illness and madness creep in. The international cast includes Vittorio Gassman, Giuliano Gemma, Philippe Noiret, Fernando Rey, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Max von Sydow, Francisco Rabal and Mohammad-Ali Keshavarz. The real-life location of the film's Fortezza Bastiani was the medieval Bam Citadel fortress in Iran, later declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, and badly damaged by a 2003 earthquake. The atmospheric score is by Ennio Morricone. “[THE DESERT OF THE TARTARS] may be the grandest and most lavish existentialist parable ever made” – Michael Atkinson, The Village Voice. DIR Valerio Zurlini; SCR Jean-Louis Bertuccelli, André G. Brunelin, from the novel "The Tartar Steppe" by Dino Buzzati; PROD Michelle de Broca, Bahman Farmanara, Mario Gallo, Enzo Giulioli, Jacques Perrin, Giorgio Silvagni. Italy/France/West Germany/Iran, 1976, color, 140 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED PG

Restored 4K DCP courtesy of Cinecittà.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[IL FEDERALE]
An anarchical comedy of the first order, Luciano Salce's THE FASCIST stars Ugo Tognazzi in his breakthrough performance as Primo Arcovazzi, a fanatical graduate of the Black Brigade (the Northern Italian fascist paramilitary), who stands to earn a promotion if he transports a notorious anti-fascist intellectual to Rome for "rehabilitation" — with the partisans, Germans and Allied Forces all nipping at their heels. THE FASCIST also marked Ennio Morricone's first credited film score, initiating the composer's long-term collaboration with Salce and showcasing an aptitude for comedy that would be honed throughout his career. (Note adapted from the Museum of Modern Art.) DIR/SCR Luciano Salce; SCR Franco Castellano, Giuseppe Moccia; PROD Dino De Laurentiis. Italy/France, 1961, b&w, 98 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

2K DCP courtesy of Cinecittà and Movietime.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[LE FOTO PROIBITE DI UNA SIGNORA PER BENE]
Co-written by the prolific Ernesto Gastaldi (TORSO, THE WHIP AND THE BODY), bathed in a seductive bossa nova–infused Ennio Morricone score and featuring a memorable turn by Nieves Navarro aka Susan Scott (THE BIG GUNDOWN, DEATH WALKS AT MIDNIGHT), this trippy giallo delight brings together the talents of many of the genre's leading lights on both sides of the camera. Minou (Dagmar Lassander, HATCHET FOR THE HONEYMOON, THE BLACK CAT) leads a pampered, dull life with her frequently absent husband Peter (Pier Paolo Capponi, THE CAT O' NINE TAILS). While out walking on the beach one night, she's accosted by a mysterious blackmailer informing her Peter is a murderer. Driven by misplaced loyalty to her husband, Minou gives in to the blackmailer's perverted whims in exchange for his silence. As he ups the ante, can Minou hold on to what little remains of her sanity? (Note adapted from the American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/PROD Luciano Ercoli; SCR Ernesto Gastaldi, Mahnahén Velasco; PROD Alberto Pugliese. Italy/Spain, 1970, color, 96 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[IL BUONO, IL BRUTTO, IL CATTIVO]
The final installment of Sergio Leone's hugely influential Spaghetti Western trilogy finds Clint Eastwood returning as the mysterious loner (representing the Good) who roams the Western frontier for fortune at the height of the Civil War. Forced to form an uneasy alliance with Lee Van Cleef's Sentenza (the Bad) and Eli Wallach's Tuco (the Ugly) to steal a cache of gold, he and the outlaws cross and double-cross each other to walk away with the treasure and stay alive. Ennio Morricone's iconic soundtrack was on the charts for over a year, reaching number four on the Billboard pop charts. DIR/SCR Sergio Leone; SCR Agenore Incrocci, Furio Scarpelli, Luciano Vincenzoni; PROD Alberto Grimaldi. Italy/Spain/West Germany, 1966, color, 179 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[IL GRANDE SILENZIO]
Chaos reigns during the Great Blizzard of 1899, driving the villagers of Snowhill, UT, to steal for survival. Enter ruthless, psychotic bounty hunter Loco (Klaus Kinski) and his band of killers, who slaughter the naïve outlaws for profit. When a woman (Vonetta McGee) becomes a widow at Loco's hands, she hires a mute gunfighter (Jean-Louis Trintignant) to avenge her husband's death. Featuring superb photography of gorgeous mountain locations in the Dolomites and Pyrenees — standing in for Utah's Rocky Mountains — and a haunting score from maestro Ennio Morricone, director Sergio Corbucci's bleak, brilliant and violent vision of an immoral, honorless West is widely considered to be among the most influential Westerns ever made. DIR/SCR Sergio Corbucci; SCR Mario Amendola, Bruno Corbucci, Vittoriano Petrilli; PROD Robert Dorfmann, Attilio Riccio. Italy/France, 1968, color, 105 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

The Greek Islands, 1943: a renowned officer (Gregory Peck) leads an intrepid team of commandos on a dangerous mission to blow up a Nazi gun battery high upon the island of Navarone, with the lives of 2,000 marooned British troops hanging in the balance. A smash hit and hugely influential men-on-a-mission wartime adventure, the film features memorable turns by David Niven, Anthony Quinn, Stanley Baker, Anthony Quayle, James Darren, Irene Papas, Gia Scala and Richard Harris, and won the Oscar® for Best Special Effects. DIR J. Lee Thompson; SCR/PROD Carl Foreman, from the novel by Alistair MacLean. UK/U.S, 1961, color, 158 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In THE HATEFUL EIGHT, set either "six or eight or 12 years" after the Civil War, a stagecoach hurtles through the wintry Wyoming landscape. The passengers, bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) and his fugitive Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh), race toward the town of Red Rock, where Ruth will bring Domergue to justice. Along the road, they encounter two strangers: Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson), a Union soldier turned infamous bounty hunter and Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins), a southern renegade who claims to be the town's new sheriff. Losing their lead on the blizzard, the quartet seeks refuge at Minnie's Haberdashery, a stagecoach stopover on a mountain pass. Upon arrival, they are greeted by four unfamiliar faces: Bob (Demian Bichir), who's taking care of Minnie's while the proprietor's away; Oswaldo Mobray (Tim Roth), the hangman of Red Rock; cowpuncher Joe Gage (Michael Madsen); and former Confederate General Sanford Smithers (Bruce Dern). As the storm overtakes the mountainside stopover, the travelers come to learn they may not make it to Red Rock after all. Ennio Morricone won his first Oscar® for his masterful score, which combined original compositions with unused music for John Carpenter's THE THING. DIR/SCR Quentin Tarantino; PROD Richard Gladstein, Shannon McIntosh, Stacey Sher. U.S., 2015, color, 167 min. RATED R

No AFI member passes accepted.

Ex-con hard case Sterling Hayden assembles a crew of colorful lowlifes to pull off a daring daytime racetrack heist. Poor judgment, bad luck and a faithless wife conspire to undo their big score, and as things fall apart, this time fractured puzzle of a story comes together. The screenplay was co-written by director Stanley Kubrick and pulp great Jim Thompson; the sharp cinematography is by Lucien Ballard. DIR/SCR Stanley Kubrick; SCR Jim Thompson, from the novel “Clean Break” by Lionel White; PROD James B. Harris. U.S., 1956, b&w, 85 min. NOT RATED

About "Kubrick: An Odyssey"
The enigmatic and elusive creator of 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, THE SHINING and A CLOCKWORK ORANGE has not been treated to a full-length biography in over 20 years. "Kubrick: An Odyssey" fills that gap. Robert P. Kolker and Nathan Abrams' definitive book (published February 2024 by Pegasus Books) is based on access to the latest research, especially Stanley Kubrick's archive at the University of the Arts, London, as well as other private papers plus new interviews with family members and those who worked with him. It presents the most in-depth portrait yet of the groundbreaking director, offering comprehensive and in-depth coverage of Kubrick's personal, private, public and working life. "Kubrick: An Odyssey" investigates not only the making of his films but also about those he wanted (but failed) to make like BURNING SECRET, NAPOLEON, ARYAN PAPERS and A.I. Revealingly, this immersive biography punctures the controversial myths about the reclusive filmmaker who created some of the most important works of art of the 20th century.

AFI Member passes accepted.

A footloose Irish sailor (Orson Welles) gets mixed up in murder with crooked and disabled lawyer (Everett Sloane) and his sultry wife (Rita Hayworth). Byzantine plot complications and baroque visuals ensue, including would-be lovers discussing a murder plot as a shark in an aquarium swims behind them, topped off by the justly legendary hall-of-mirrors shootout finale. DIR/SCR/PROD Orson Welles; SCR based on the novel "If I Die Before I Wake" by Sherwood King. US, 1948, b&w, 87 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

[I BASILISCHI]
Lina Wertmüller's directorial debut is also an early collaboration with Ennio Morricone, who was only in his mid-30s and had been composing music for pictures for less than three years when he wrote the at times contemplative, at others lighthearted tracks for THE LIZARDS. This film from one of Italy's most notable 20th-century directors, which follows three aimless young men in a sleepy village, reveals her fascination with class structure and social systems right out of the gate, while Morricone's score exhibits a playful side that is reflective of the film's satirical tone. Morricone's work on THE LIZARDS would prepare him for the comedic sensibilities he would later apply to films such as LA CAGE AUX FOLLES (1978) and TIE ME UP! TIE ME DOWN! (1990). (Note adapted from the Academy Museum.) DIR/SCR Lina Wertmüller; PROD Lionello Santi. Italy, 1963, b&w, 85 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

4K digital restoration by Cinecittà.

AFI Member passes accepted.

A mysterious stranger (James Stewart) unsettles the residents of Coronado, NM, when he asks too many questions about a recent Apache attack that wiped out the local cavalry unit. But a run-in with the local cattle baron's hotheaded son (Alex Nicol), sets him on the path to getting some answers — and also toward a deadly showdown. The last of the Mann-Stewart Westerns, and the only one filmed in CinemaScope, this film combines epic Western grandeur with some of the most down-and-dirty screen violence of its era. DIR Anthony Mann; SCR Frank Burt, Philip Yordan; PROD William Goetz. U.S., 1955, color, 104 min. NOT RATED

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From Carson McCullers' 1946 novel, producer Stanley Kramer and director Fred Zinnemann craft a sensitive and surprising portrait of adolescence and longing. Julie Harris made her Oscar®-nominated feature-film debut as tween tomboy Frankie Addams, who feels "unjoined" to the rest of the world in her sleepy Southern town and disconnected from her absentee father and deceased mother, but who longs to tag along with her newlywed brother and his bride on their honeymoon in Alaska. Ethel Waters gives an outstanding performance as Berenice, the housekeeper who is Frankie's surrogate mother figure, and who has her own vision of a better world, different from the one outside her door. Frankie's oddball young cousin John Henry (Brandon De Wilde) rounds out their household; Harris, Waters and De Wilde all starred in the 1950 Broadway stage version before being cast in the film. DIR Fred Zinnemann; SCR Edna Anhalt, Edward Anhalt, based on the novel by Carson McCullers; PROD Stanley Kramer. U.S., 1952, b&w, 93 min. NOT RATED

Also part of Fabulous ‘50s.

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In the Paraguayan jungle, a priest lashed to a crucifix goes over a waterfall to the sound of Ennio Morricone's pulsating score, but that doesn't stop 18th-century missionary Father Gabriel (Jeremy Irons). Meanwhile, hot-tempered human trafficker Captain Mendoza (Robert De Niro) — after paying penance for his brother's death by hauling a net full of armor up a cliff — joins in to create a South American Camelot. But Cardinal Altamirano (Ray McAnally) has bad news from the Vatican. This sweeping, bitter epic about colonialism and faith won the Palme d'Or at the 1986 Cannes Festival, followed by an Oscar® for Best Cinematography. DIR Roland Joffé; SCR Robert Bolt; PROD Fernando Ghia, David Puttnam. UK/France, 1986, color, 126 min. In English and Guaraní, Spanish and Latin with English subtitles. RATED PG

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[SOSEOLGAUI YEONGHWA 소설가의 영화]
Winner of the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize at the 2022 Berlin International Film Festival and a must-see for Hong Sangsoo fans, THE NOVELIST'S FILM is "as close as Hong has come to dramatizing his own process," according to Dennis Lim, author of a book-length study of the director's work. Hong's on-screen proxy is Jun-hee (Lee Hye-young, IN FRONT OF YOUR FACE), a novelist who has grown disenchanted with her writing. After a chance encounter with a famous actress (longtime Hong collaborator Kim Min-hee) at a similar artistic crossroads, Jun-hee decides to make a movie with her. What follows is both a peek at Hong's methods and an interrogation of what we expect of works of art, ending in a surprising final flourish that hints at a new direction in his work. (Note adapted from the National Museum of Asian Art.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2022, b&w/color, 92 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

THE OLD OAK is the last pub standing in a once thriving mining village in northern England, a gathering space for a community that has fallen on hard times. There is growing anger, resentment and a lack of hope among the residents, but the pub and its proprietor, TJ, are a fond presence to their customers. When a group of Syrian refugees move into the floundering town, a decisive rift fueled by prejudices develops between the community and its newest inhabitants. The formation of an unexpected friendship between TJ and a young Syrian woman named Yara opens up new possibilities for the divided village in this deeply moving drama about loss, fear and the difficulty of finding hope. Following the 2020 release of his SORRY WE MISSED YOU, legendary British director Ken Loach, who is 87 years old, announced that THE OLD OAK would be his final film. (Note adapted from Zeitgeist Films.) DIR Ken Loach; SCR Paul Laverty; PROD Rebecca O'Brien. UK, 2023, color, 113 min. NOT RATED

Co-presented by the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University and Power At Work.

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

A group of women in the Episcopal Church share their call to become priests. After two legislative votes to make it possible for women to be ordained fail, they organize their own ordination as priests in defiance of church norms. The Church of the Advocate, a Black urban church in North Philadelphia, welcomes them. A huge congregation witnesses the service on July 29, 1974. Changing an institution based on 2,000 years of history is an enormous task. The women priests face threats and harassment. Some lose family and friends, and others are banned from setting foot on church property. Their opponents repeatedly question whether they are "proper matter for ordination." Their ordination becomes not only a personal struggle but also a very public battle over whether women are qualified to lead. Despite the backlash, they successfully change the church by asserting their leadership and a vision for "a new way" on their own terms. In a women's rights story most people have never heard, we meet these trailblazers who challenge the very essence of patriarchy within Christendom and successfully create a blueprint for lasting institutional change. DIR/PROD Margo Guernsey; DIR Nikki Bramley. U.S., 2024, color, 90 min. NOT RATED

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Just released from prison, deadpan, small-time Kosher Nostra member Harry Plotnick (Martin Priest) is trying to regain his lost turf in a neighborhood turned topsy-turvy. After a chance reunion with his ex-wife and grown children, Harry is suddenly immersed in middle-class normality and goes meshugga when he gets into the catering biz with his ex-brother-in-law (Ben Lang). What follows is a world of call girls, bar mitzvahs, lingerie fashion shows, Cuban-Chinese mobsters, subway parties, Mafia barbecues, dog-training classes, Congressional hearings and hotel pajama parties. Shelved by writer/director Michael Roemer in 1969 following a laughless preview, THE PLOT AGAINST HARRY emerged two decades later when he overheard a technician performing a video transfer of the film laughing hysterically. On a whim, Roemer made two 35mm prints and sent them to the New York and Toronto film festivals (it was a hit with audiences) before releasing the movie theatrically to great acclaim in early 1990 as a bona fide comedy classic. (Note adapted from Film Forum.) DIR/SCR/PROD Michael Roemer; PROD Robert M. Young. U.S., 1989, b&w, 81 min. NOT RATED

Restored by DuArt, New York.

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"We've been had, amigo." A rich Texas rancher (Ralph Bellamy) hires four mercenaries to retrieve his wife Maria (Claudia Cardinale), kidnapped by notorious Mexican bandit Jesus Raza (Jack Palance), in Richard Brooks' cult classic Western adventure. Hired for $10,000 each are demolitions expert Bill Dolworth (Burt Lancaster), gunfighter Rico Fardan (Lee Marvin), horse wrangler Hans Ehrengard (Robert Ryan) and scout Jake Sharp (Woody Strode). As if traveling 100 miles south of the border with the Mexican Revolution in full swing and taking on Raza and his men weren't challenges enough, it turns out that Maria doesn't want to be rescued in the first place. DIR/SCR/PROD Richard Brooks, from the novel "A Mule for the Marquesa" by Frank O'Rourke. U.S., 1966, color, 117 min. RATED PG-13

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[BASTARDEN]
Denmark, 18th century. A retired army captain with humble origins, Ludvig Kahlen (Mads Mikkelsen, ANOTHER ROUND), makes a deal with the king: successfully settle Jutland and ascend to nobility. Arriving with nothing but a shovel and sheer willpower, Kahlen refuses to yield to the harsh landscape, dreaming of planting imported German potatoes. With the help of a runaway couple, a priest and a precocious orphan, he makes progress, but his unhinged noble neighbor Frederik de Schinkel (Simon Bennebjerg) will stop at nothing to prevent his success. As tensions escalate and violence erupts, the singularly focused Kahlen must decide just how much he is willing to risk. Mikkelsen, reuniting with A ROYAL AFFAIR director Nikolaj Arcel, delivers a star turn in this rollicking period Danish Western filled with romance, intrigue and revenge. Official Selection, 2023 Venice, AFI FEST and Toronto film festivals. DIR/SCR Nikolaj Arcel; SCR Anders Thomas Jensen, from a novel by Ida Jessen; PROD Louise Vesth. Denmark/Germany/Sweden, 2023, color, 127 min. In Danish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

[LE CLAN DES SICILIENS]
In Henri Verneuil's classic heist thriller, Alain Delon portrays escaped fugitive Roger Sartet, a jewel thief taken in by a Sicilian crime boss (the great Jean Gabin). Sartet offers the gang a plan he learned in prison for a daring diamond heist, which they set in motion despite the relentless pursuit of a dogged detective played by Lino Ventura. The real pitfall, however, is Sartet's play for the boss' daughter-in-law (Irina Demick). Gallic testosterone runs amok in this high-flying thriller, enhanced in no small measure by Ennio Morricone's evocative score. (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR/SCR/PROD Henri Verneuil; SCR José Giovanni, Pierre Pelegri, from the novel by Auguste Le Breton; PROD Jacques-Eric Strauss. France/Italy/U.S., 1969, color, 122 min. In Italian, English and French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

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Over 40 years after its release, John Carpenter's stylish and suspenseful THE THING still boasts some of the most shockingly grotesque and fiendishly inventive monster effects ever put on screen, courtesy of master makeup artist Rob Bottin, putting much of today's CGI to shame. Frequent Carpenter collaborator Kurt Russell stars as R.J. MacReady, leading a rapidly dwindling and ever-more paranoid group of Antarctic-based scientists in their fight against a shape-shifting alien that can assume any animal form, at times combining different species' parts into some gruesome improvisations. Carpenter's lunatic vision, accompanied by Ennio Morricone's pulsating synth score, demands to be seen on the big screen. DIR John Carpenter; SCR Bill Lancaster, from the novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell Jr.; PROD David Foster, Lawrence Turman. U.S., 1982, color, 109 min. RATED R

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"The Tingler is in the theater!" Dr. Warren Chapin (Vincent Price) discovers a deadly creature dubbed "The Tingler" living inside the spine of every person. The parasite feeds on human fear and, if left unchecked, can cause instant death. The scientist's theory is that hearing the human host's screams can weaken and paralyze the creature. After he surgically removes one such creature from its frightened-to-death victim for testing, things spiral out of control when the beast escapes and seeks refuge in a crowded movie theater. DIR/PROD William Castle; SCR Robb White. U.S., 1959, color/b&w, 82 min. NOT RATED

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During the peak of Prohibition, young federal agent Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner) is sent to Chicago to put an end to the lucrative and highly illegal liquor empire of notorious gangster Al Capone (Robert De Niro) — using any and all legal means necessary. To do so, Ness assembles a crack team of cops — played by Charles Martin Smith, Andy Garcia and Sean Connery (who won the Academy Award® for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Jim Malone) — but the ensuing battle will test the straight-arrow cop's convictions. Adapted from the 1960s TV series of the same name, itself based on the real Ness' memoirs of his time warring against Capone, THE UNTOUCHABLES is a violent yet often funny ode to the gangster flicks of the '50s featuring impeccable attention to period detail and a soaring, Grammy®-winning score by Ennio Morricone. DIR Brian De Palma; SCR David Mamet; PROD Art Linson. U.S., 1987, color, 119 min. RATED R

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THE WILD PARROTS OF TELEGRAPH HILL is the true story of Mark Bittner, a dharma bum and homeless street musician in San Francisco, and his remarkable relationship with a flock of wild green and red parrots. A sort of Bohemian St. Francis, Bittner falls in with the flock as he searches for meaning in his life, unaware that the wild parrots will bring him everything he needs. Over 20 years after its original release — and an intensive five-and-a-half-year restoration process — Judy Irving's acclaimed documentary returns to delight audiences with a heartwarming relationship between a man and his feathered friends. (Note adapted from Shadow Distribution.) DIR/PROD Judy Irving. U.S., 2003, color, 83 min. RATED G

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Overachieving autoworker Lulu (an outstanding Gian Maria Volonté) is a superstar on the factory floor, the darling of his employers and the envy of his colleagues due to the ease of his production. But after he loses a finger in a work accident, he begins to question what it's all about and sets out on a strange journey that will see him go on strike, get fired, take up with student Communists and eventually return to work more bewildered than enlightened. The film shared the Palme d'Or at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival with THE MATEI AFFAIR, which also starred Volonté. The second film in director Elio Petri's Ennio Morricone–scored Trilogia della nevrosi — preceded by INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN ABOVE SUSPICION and followed by PROPERTY IS NO LONGER A THEFT — THE WORKING CLASS GOES TO HEAVEN is a surreal and darkly comic takedown of capitalism and industrial corruption in 20th-century Italy. DIR/SCR Elio Petri; SCR Ugo Pirro; PROD Ugo Tucci. Italy, 1971, color, 125 min. In Italian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

2K DCP courtesy of Cinecittà and Movietime.

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"[A] kind of psychotronic NIGHT OF THE HUNTER." – Alan Licht, Film Comment. Over the years, this infamous passion project written, directed and produced by cult character actor Timothy Carey (Stanley Kubrick's THE KILLING and PATHS OF GLORY) has deservedly earned its reputation as a midnight-movie holy grail, difficult to find but steeped in legend. Thanks to the work of the Academy Film Archive and The Film Foundation, whose founder Martin Scorsese is among the film's champions, THE WORLD'S GREATEST SINNER can now be seen in a new digital restoration. Carey plays Clarence Hilliard, a suburban father and husband who quits his job as an insurance salesman to pursue music stardom — despite having no musical ability — and start his own religion/political party, declaring himself "God" Hilliard. Improbably achieving a measure of success with his efforts, Hilliard remains dissatisfied and aims even higher, declaring he'll run for U.S. president. Carey's subversive wit and offbeat, occasionally squirm-inducing humor make this burlesque of male vanity, ambition and fakery a one-of-a-kind movie experience. The film features a score by the young Frank Zappa, marking his professional music debut, predating his first Mothers of Invention LP by several years. DIR/SCR/PROD Timothy Carey. U.S., 1963, b&w, 78 min. NOT RATED

Restored by the Academy Film Archive and The Film Foundation, with funding provided by the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[¡ÁTAME!]
In one of Pedro Almodóvar's most risqué comedies, a newly released mental patient (Antonio Banderas) stalks and kidnaps the object of his obsession — former porn star Marina (Victoria Abril) — and then holds her captive until she falls in love with him, in a bizarre case study of Stockholm syndrome. Punctuated by a tense Ennio Morricone musical score, the film remains controversial more for its sadomasochistic undertones and the victimization of women than for its graphic nudity and passionate sex scenes. DIR/SCR Pedro Almodóvar; PROD Enrique Posner. Spain, 1990, color, 101 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. RATED NC-17

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In 1860s Mexico, during the Juarista resistance to the forces of Emperor Maximilian, a mercenary (Clint Eastwood) rescues a nun (Shirley MacLaine) from a spot of bother involving three ill-intentioned thugs, only to then be persuaded into helping her get revenge on the Mexican Army. Eastwood mentor and frequent collaborator Don Siegel directs a script by former blacklistee Albert Maltz, from a story by Western great Budd Boetticher that recalls the made-for-each-other bickering of THE AFRICAN QUEEN and the sexual tension of HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALLISON. The film also features cinematography by the great Gabriel Figueroa and a stellar score by Ennio Morricone. DIR Don Siegel; SCR Albert Maltz; PROD Carroll Case, Martin Rackin. U.S./Mexico, 1970, color, 116 min. RATED PG

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The shadow of the Vietnam conflict hangs heavily over this revisionist Western from pulp auteur Robert Aldrich, set in 1880s Arizona. Fed up with the U.S. Indian Agency's mistreatment, Apache Ulzana (Joaquín Martínez, who starred opposite Robert Redford the same year in Sydney Pollack's JEREMIAH JOHNSON as Crow chief Paints His Shirt Red) goes off the reservation and on the warpath, leading a small band of braves on a brutal, murderous campaign of terror. Grizzled army scout McIntosh (Burt Lancaster) is given the thankless task of tracking down the marauders, alongside Apache scout Ke-Ni-Tay (Jorge Luke) — Ulzana's brother-in-law — and idealistic, inexperienced Lieutenant Garnett DeBuin (Bruce Davison). DIR Robert Aldrich; SCR Alan Sharp; PROD Carter DeHaven. U.S., 1972, color, 103 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[UNRUEH]
New technologies are transforming a 19th-century watchmaking town in Switzerland. Josephine, a young factory worker, produces the unrest wheel, swinging in the heart of the mechanical watch. Exposed to new ways of organizing money, time and labor, she gets involved with the local movement of the anarchist watchmakers, where she meets Russian traveler Pyotr Kropotkin. (Note courtesy of KimStim.) DIR/SCR Cyril Schäublin; PROD Michela Pini, Linda Vogel. Switzerland, 2022, color, 93 min. In Swiss-German, French and Russian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

Returning to her East Coast childhood home to heal old familial wounds, Jo (Brooke Adams, DAYS OF HEAVEN, INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS) finds her adoptive mother withdrawn and distant and a half-sister who has successfully escaped the cold clutches of their family. Impulsively, Jo enters into the troubled life of the neighbors, befriending a couple whose marriage is collapsing under the weight of alcoholism and mental illness. A melodrama without the traditional indicators, VENGEANCE IS MINE (originally titled HAUNTED) is a considerably more pointed continuation of Michael Roemer's previous insights on fraught relationships. Though completely different in tone than NOTHING BUT A MAN and THE PLOT AGAINST HARRY, VENGEANCE IS MINE forms a trinity of utterly original works confronting the inevitable complications within the American family. (Note courtesy of The Film Desk.) DIR/SCR Michael Roemer; PROD Stanley D. Plotnick. U.S., 1984, color, 118 min. NOT RATED

Restored by Colorlab, Rockville, Maryland.

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[O! SU-JEONG 오! 수정]
When filmmaker Young-soo (Moon Sung-keun) introduces his wealthy gallery owner friend Jae-hoon (Jeong Bo-seok) to another friend, the female television writer Soo-jung (Lee Eun-ju), the table is set for a complicated love triangle — a situation that repeatedly fascinates Hong Sangsoo, and at times garners him comparisons to Éric Rohmer. Documenting the resulting emotional tug-of-war with his usual light touch and acuity, Hong's third film launched Lee as a star in South Korea and is perhaps the finest cinematic memorial to the departed actress, who took her own life at age 24. More than 20 years later, Hong Sangsoo's cubist romance stands as one of his most visually and formally modernist films, perfecting his trademark dry wit alongside his talents for capturing the interplay between the sexes and toying with the mechanics of storytelling. (Note adapted from Grasshopper Film.) DIR/SCR Hong Sangsoo; PROD Ahn Byeong-ju. South Korea, 2000, b&w, 126 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[TOP 탑]
Hong Sangsoo's second film of 2022 marked a return to his frequent use of unorthodox narrative structures. And this time, the structure is a literal one. WALK UP stars Hong regular Kwon Hae-hyo (in his ninth film with the director) as Byung-soo, a successful filmmaker who takes his daughter to meet an old friend, Ms. Kim (Lee Hye-young), in a small apartment building she owns. When Mrs. Kim invites him to move into the vacant top-floor apartment, the film swerves into gently surrealist territory, as each floor of the building comes to embody a different period in Byung-soo's life — or perhaps a series of alternate realities altogether. "A film of gently discombobulating pleasures," wrote Justin Chang in the Los Angeles Times, "constructed with a care and intricacy that never hinders the life, spontaneity and sense of possibility bursting out of every frame." It will leave you feeling like you've spent the afternoon polishing off a few bottles of wine with a group of good friends. (Note adapted from the National Museum of Asian Art.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2022, b&w, 97 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Mauritanian French director Med Hondo's WEST INDIES: THE FUGITIVE SLAVES OF LIBERTY proved a watershed event for African cinema — the continent's first musical as well as a sui generis amalgam of historical epic, Broadway revue, Brechtian theater and joyous agitprop. Using an enormous mock slave ship as the film's only soundstage, Hondo mounts intricately choreographed reenactments and dance numbers across his multipurpose set to investigate more than three centuries of imperialist oppression. The story traverses the West Indies, Europe and the Middle Passage; jumps across time to depict the effects of official French policy upon the colonized, the enslaved and their descendants; and surveys the actions and motivations of the resigned, the revolutionary and the powers that be (along with their lackeys). No mere extravaganza, the film is a call to arms for a spectacular yet critical cinematic reimagining of an entire people's history of resistance and struggle. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR/PROD Med Hondo; SCR Daniel Boukman. France/Algeria/Mauritania, 1979, color, 116 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

Digitally restored by the Harvard Film Archive and Ciné-Archives using the original 35mm picture negative and magnetic track. Financial support provided by the McMillan.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[COSA AVETE FATTO A SOLANGE?]
A sexually sadistic killer is preying on the girls of St. Mary's School. Student Elizabeth witnessed one of the murders, but her hazy recollections of a knife-wielding figure in black do nothing to further the police's investigations. Why is the killer choosing these young women? And what does it have to do with a girl named Solange? Backed by Ennio Morricone's abundantly creepy score, this giallo whodunit features top-shelf art-house filmmaking from director Massimo Dallamano (the cinematographer of Leone's A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS and FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE) and endless jazzy twists. (Note adapted from the American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Massimo Dallamano; SCR Bruno Di Geronimo; PROD Fulvio Lucisano, Leo Pescarolo. Italy/West Germany/UK, 1972, color, 107 min. In Italian with English subtitles. RATED R

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A 1920s English seaside town bears witness to a farcical and occasionally sinister scandal in this riotous mystery-comedy. Based on a stranger-than-fiction true-crime story, WICKED LITTLE LETTERS follows two neighbors: deeply conservative local Edith Swan (Olivia Colman) and rowdy Irish migrant Rose Gooding (Jessie Buckley). When Edith and her fellow residents begin to receive wicked letters full of unintentionally hilarious profanities, foul-mouthed Rose is charged with the crime. The anonymous letters prompt a national uproar, and a trial ensues. However, as the townswomen — led by Police Officer Gladys Moss (Anjana Vasan) — begin to investigate the crime themselves, they suspect that something is amiss, and Rose may not be the culprit after all. DIR Thea Sharrock; SCR Johnny Sweet; PROD Graham Broadbent, Olivia Colman, Peter Czernin, Ed Sinclair, Jo Wallett. UK, 2023, color, 102 min. RATED R

No AFI Member passes accepted.

3-D restoration from 2K scans of the left and right eye interpositives! From Budd Boetticher, the outstanding director of RED BALL EXPRESS, HORIZONS WEST, SEMINOLE, SEVEN MEN FROM NOW and RIDE LONESOME, comes this exciting Western adventure starring Van Heflin (3:10 TO YUMA, SHANE) and Julie Adams (BEND OF THE RIVER). Gringo miner Irish Gallager (Heflin) is caught up in the Mexican Revolution of 1910–11 when corrupt administrator Colonel Paco Ruiz (George Dolenz, SCARED STIFF) unjustly seizes his gold mine. Gallager saves the life of guerrilla leader Raquel Noriega (Adams), then finds there's a price on his head. They become romantically involved throughout a series of rescues and ambushes, leading up to the march on Ciudad Juárez by Pascual Orozco (Noah Beery Jr., THE SPIKES GANG). (Note adapted from Kino Lorber.) DIR Budd Boetticher; SCR Kay Lenard, James E. Moser, adapted from the novel by Gerald Drayson Adams; PROD Aaron Rosenberg. U.S., 1953, color, 81 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This thinly veiled and hyper-paranoiac take on the JFK assassination stars Jeff Bridges as Nick Kegan, scion of a fabulously wealthy and powerful family headed by a patriarch played by John Huston ("the real delight of the film" – Vincent Canby, The New York Times) — a character based on Joe Kennedy. Bridges soon finds himself going down multiple rabbit holes while trying to unravel the conspiracy behind the murder of a U.S. president, his older brother. The all-star cast is rounded out by Anthony Perkins, Eli Wallach, Sterling Hayden, Dorothy Malone, Tomas Milian, Belinda Bauer, Ralph Meeker, Toshiro Mifune and Richard Boone. (Note adapted from Rialto Pictures.) DIR/SCR William Richert, from the novel by Richard Condon; PROD Fred Caruso. U.S., 1979, color, 97 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[HAEBYEONEUI YEOIN 해변의 여인]
Filmmaker Kim Jung-rae (Kim Seung-woo), suffering from writer's block, takes a trip to the coast with his production designer Won Chang-wook (Kim Tae-woo), who brings along the vivacious Kim Mun-suk (Go Hyun-jung). Soon after their arrival, Mun-suk falls for Jung-rae's advances; however, the fickle hero can't commit and awkwardly parts with her. What had been a sardonic JULES AND JIM turns into a burlesque VERTIGO when Jung-rae returns to the coastal resort and attempts to re-create the original romance with a woman who resembles Mun-suk, until his jilted lover shows up. Presented in a 4K restoration courtesy of Grasshopper Film and completed by the Korean Film Archive from the original 35mm negative. (Note courtesy of Grasshopper Film.) DIR/SCR Hong Sangsoo; PROD Oh Jung-wan. South Korea, 2006, color, 127 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[RADNIČKA KLASA IDE U PAKAO]
Five years after a factory fire claimed the lives of several workers and, with them, the primary livelihood of a rural Balkan town, the plant's union is met with a debilitating blow in their fight for reparations. Long suspected of causing the fire in order to privatize their property, the owners have successfully evaded legal consequence, and the workers are cast as ungrateful nuisances, obstinate in the face of capitalistic progress. Stoic labor leader Ceca (Tamara Krcunović) refuses to give up hope, but her position grows tenuous as the collective develops a fascination with the pagan practices of its newest member, Mija (Leon Lučev). After Mija leads the union in a ritual that belies a satanic undertone, strange occurrences are reported around town, including the enigmatic manifestation of a decrepit man seen stalking the most corrupt citizens. Serbian vanguard filmmaker Mladen Đorđević (THE LIFE AND DEATH OF A PORNO GANG) once again offers up a view of the disturbing absurdities of living under an oppressive oligarchy. As his proletarian protagonists turn toward the supernatural, he skillfully soaks their increasingly eldritch activity in an absorbing chiaroscuro horror aesthetic, conjuring a malaise of uncomfortable dread. Yet Đorđević also impressively cuts this tone with sly satire, reminding the viewer that sometimes the only salvation for the working class, besides solidarity, is a sharp sense of humor. (Note adapted from Toronto International Film Festival.) DIR/SCR/PROD Mladen Đorđević; PROD Milan Stojanović. Serbia/Greece/Bulgaria/Montenegro/Croatia/Romania, 2023, color, 127 min. In Serbian with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted. Union members receive Silver Cinema Club (Star level) ticket discount. Must present union card.

Animator Don Hertzfeldt explores the human condition through this trilogy of sci-fi shorts that are as thought-provoking as they are hilarious.

WORLD OF TOMORROW (2015)
A little girl is taken on a mind-bending tour of her distant future. Originally conceived as a way to practice digital animation while simultaneously creating a couch gag for THE SIMPSONS, Don Hertzfeldt's 2015 short features deceptively simple stick-figure characters amid abstract backgrounds. Its macabre humor, delivered primarily through Julia Pott's monotone narration as clone Emily, is interspersed by the amusing, unscripted recordings of Winona Mae, Hertzfeldt's then-four-year-old niece, as the original Emily. This element of childhood whimsy is integral to balancing out the film's dark absurdism, paving the way for its core theme: life is precious, and the sadness permeating our day-to-day is a reminder to cherish it.Winner, Grand Jury Prize for Short Film, Sundance film Festival; Nominee, Best Animated Short, 2015 Academy Awards®. DIR/SCR/PROD Don Hertzfeldt. U.S., 2015, color, 17 min. NOT RATED

WORLD OF TOMORROW EPISODE TWO: THE BURDEN OF OTHER PEOPLE'S THOUGHTS
When the Earth explodes before the consciousness of Emily Prime can be transferred into a clone, the incomplete third-generation backup, Emily 6, travels backward through time to complete the task herself and finally become whole — whatever that means. Don Hertzfeldt's ingenious animation and knack for telling a distressingly poignant tale leavened with achingly funny jokes are in perfect form in this unplanned sequel to his 2015 Academy Award®–nominated WORLD OF TOMORROW. Developed over a year and a half utilizing additional recordings of his young niece, Winona Mae, Hertzfelt's second film in the trilogy is an astonishing dive into the joys and melancholy that make up who we are. DIR/SCR/PROD Don Hertzfeldt. U.S., 2017, color, 23 min. NOT RATED

WORLD OF TOMORROW EPISODE THREE: THE ABSENT DESTINATIONS OF DAVID PRIME
While rocketing through space, David is greeted by a hidden memory implanted by a future wife of his future clone urging him to travel to a remote planet and uncover additional memories she has lost. Unfortunately for David, his neural implants lack the space to store this information, forcing him to delete skills he has acquired over his lifetime to make room — a process he repeats on his journey through the cosmos. The final installment in Don Hertzefelt’s tragicomic trilogy shifts its narrative gears toward a more cynical yet no less affecting examination of human existence that will leave you crying tears of laughter and anguish. DIR/SCR/PROD Don Hertzfeldt. U.S., 2020, color, 34 min. NOT RATED

ON MEMORY
Released as a bonus feature on the home-video release of the WORLD OF TOMORROW trilogy, this nine-minute short from Don Hertzfeldt finds the animator musing about the nature of memory while recounting his own. DIR/SCR/PROD Don Hertzfeldt. U.S., 2021, color, 9 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

An adaptation of Ousmane Sembène's own 1973 novel, XALA offers a hilarious, caustic satire of political corruption under an inept patriarchy. On the night of his wedding to a third bride, government official El Hadji Abdoukader Beye (Thierno Leye) is rendered impotent. After suspecting that one of his other wives has placed a curse (xala) on him, and after enlisting a local marabout for a cure, El Hadji must face the possibility that he deserves the infliction for his part in the embezzlement of public funds and for helping to keep Senegal in French hands. When even uglier reasons are revealed behind his loss of manhood, El Hadji endures a final ignominy from a group of disenfranchised citizens that he has conveniently overlooked. Adeptly combining elements from African folklore and popular cinema, Sembène uses XALA to indict the immoral hubris of entitled male authority figures and Senegalese sellouts. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Ousmane Sembène; PROD Paulin Vieyra. Senegal, 1975, color, 123 min. In French and Wolof with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

A remake of the beloved 1941 Argentine film LOS MARTES, ORQUÍDEAS [ON TUESDAYS, ORCHIDS], YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER was a follow-up to the 1942 hit YOU'LL NEVER GET RICH and marked the second — and final — screen pairing of Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth. In YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER, Bob Davis (Astaire), an American dancer in Buenos Aires, finds himself desperate for work after losing all his money. He takes a gig at a wedding, hoping to impress the bride's father, Eduardo Acuña (Adolphe Menjou), a local club owner who has decreed that his daughters must marry in order of age. Eduardo eventually agrees to allow Bob to perform at his club, but only under the condition that he play suitor to his second-oldest daughter, the beautiful Maria (Hayworth). Hayworth proves once again to be a stunning dancer, especially in "Shorty George" and "I'm Old Fashioned," a romantic moonlit duet with Astaire that is the high point of the film. The score received an Academy Award® nomination, alongside nods for Best Sound and Best Song ("Dearly Beloved") by Jerome Kern and Johnny Mercer. Hayworth wanted to do her own singing, but her voice was dubbed by Nan Wynn, a well-kept secret at the time. Nevertheless, Hayworth went on record saying that YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER was the favorite of all her films, second only to YOU'LL NEVER GET RICH. (Note adapted from Sony Pictures.) DIR William A. Seiter; SCR Michael Fessier, Ernest Pagano, Delmer Daves, based on the story by Carlos A. Olivari and Sixto Pondal Ríos; PROD Louis F. Edelman. U.S., 1942, b&w, 97 min. NOT RATED

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[DANGSINJASINGWA DANGSINUI GEOT 당신자신과 당신의 것]
One of Hong Sangsoo's most delightful comic mysteries, YOURSELF AND YOURS is a reverse spin on Luis Buñuel's THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE. When painter Young-soo (Kim Joo-hyuk) learns that his girlfriend, Min-jung (Lee Yoo-young), was recently seen having drinks with another man, he can't help but question her about it. It doesn't go well, and they part on bad terms. The next day, Young-soo tries to find her but can't. As he wanders and frets, Min-jung has a series of encounters with other men. But to them, it seems she's not herself. Featuring a supporting cast of Hong regulars, YOURSELF AND YOURS is a pleasing puzzle made up of mistaken identity, excessive drinking and lots of he-said, she-said. As the rumors pile up, Hong asks: in a relationship, how important is it to know everything? Winner, Best Director, 2016 San Sebastián International Film Festival. (Note adapted from Cinema Guild.) DIR/SCR/PROD Hong Sangsoo. South Korea, 2016, color, 86 min. In Korean with English subtitles. NOT RATED