Films Now Showing

Taking place within the confines of a single stage set and merging theater, memory and autobiography, this intimate three-hander focuses on a veteran theater director (Erland Josephson) preparing for his fifth production of August Strindberg's "A Dream Play." When he encounters both his ambitious young lead (Lena Olin) and the washed-up star of a former production (Ingrid Thulin) following a rehearsal, the encounters and connections between the three characters form a poignant meditation on life, theater and the process of connecting the two. Made for television in Sweden, AFTER THE REHEARSAL was theatrically distributed in the U.S., much to the dismay of Ingmar Bergman, who had previously declared 1982's FANNY AND ALEXANDER to be his final feature film. Nevertheless, the film was hailed as "one of Bergman's greatest films" by Andrew Sarris and has become a key work in Bergman's late-career filmography. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Jörn Donner. Sweden/West Germany, 1984, color, 70 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[FÖR ATT INTE TALA OM ALLA DESSA KVINNOR]
Conceived as an amusing diversion in the wake of the despairing THE SILENCE, this comedy is Ingmar Bergman's first film in color, and it looks like a glorious chocolate box. Working from a bawdy screenplay he co-wrote with actor Erland Josephson, about a supercilious critic drawn into the dizzying orbit of a famous cellist, Bergman brings together buoyant comic turns from a number of his frequent collaborators, including Jarl Kulle, Eva Dahlbeck, Harriet Andersson and Bibi Andersson. ALL THESE WOMEN, in which Bergman pokes fun at the pretensions of drawing room art, possesses a distinctly playful atmosphere and a carefree rhythm. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; SCR Erland Josephson; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1964, b&w/color, 80 min. In Swedish, English, German and French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

At the Palacio, a rather forlorn, all-inclusive resort somewhere in the Caribbean, there arrives an unusual guest, a gentle French-Canadian behemoth named Mike. After his arrival, unexpected and unusual events begin to take place in this quiet, shabby, sundrenched sanctuary. His voracious appetite, mysterious magnetism and otherworldly talents — one of which is as an "octopus whisperer" — combine to attract resort staff and tourists alike. Regarded as some kind of spiritual healer, Mike soon finds himself receiving the many and varied affections of those staying at the peculiar resort. His strange, saintly status will eventually complicate not only the operations of the resort itself, but also the intimate personal lives of its staff and guests. Absurdist in some places, magic realist in others, and reminiscent of the deadpan drollery of Aki Kaurismäki and Ulrich Seidl, Ian Lagarde's arresting debut feature gives new meaning to north-south relations. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Ian Lagarde; PROD Ménaïc Raoul, Gabrielle Tougas-Fréchette. Canada/Cuba, 2017, color, 85 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ian Lagarde is a Montreal-based filmmaker. He studied film production at Concordia University in that city, and his early works include the TV documentary THE AMERICAN SAVANNAH (2009) and the short films SOLAR WIND (2011), BOARD (2012) and DAYBREAK (2013). He was also the cinematographer for Denis Côté's VIC + FLO SAW A BEAR (2013). ALL YOU CAN EAT BUDDHA is Ian Lagarde's first feature.

"Lagarde's talent for crafting arresting and macabre visual imagery is undeniable." – Screen International

[HÖSTSONATEN]
In a long-planned collaboration, Ingrid Bergman (in an Oscar®-nominated performance) returned to Swedish cinema after 40 years for her last feature film role, a concert pianist returning home to an anguished reunion with neglected daughter Liv Ullmann. "The best Ingmar Bergman film in years, filled with his liberating mixture of violence and tenderness that is the sign of emotional truth." – Jack Kroll, Newsweek. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman. Sweden, 1978, color, 93 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ken Adam won the Oscar® for Best Art Direction for Stanley Kubrick's painstaking evocation of 18th-century life, featuring sumptuous palace rooms and nighttime scenes illuminated only by candlelight. 1970s heartthrob Ryan O'Neal gives one of his best performances as callow striver Redmond Barry, a reluctant conscript in the British army after leaving his Irish home in disgrace. On the frontlines on the Continent, events lead first to Barry's desertion, then his re-enlistment on the victorious Prussian side; he continues to try his luck in a series of palace intrigues, high-stakes gambling and the strategic seduction of noblewoman Marisa Berenson. Adam's Oscar® was one of four won by the film, along with Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design and Best Music. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick, from the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray. U.S./UK, 1975, color, 184 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

[ENTRE LA MER ET L'EAU DOUCE]
Francophone country boy and aspiring folk singer Claude (played by musician Claude Gauthier) hails from St-Irénée, a small fishing and logging village on the St. Lawrence River. When he decides to try his luck in the big city, he leaves behind his girlfriend Denyse (Denise Bombardier) and his hometown to make his way to Montreal, where he shows up on brother's doorstep, guitar case in hand. Initially moving from job to job — in a slaughterhouse, as a garbage-man, a construction worker and an elevator operator at a music store — Claude eventually becomes a successful musician. But when he decides to return home after a failed romance and his burgeoning fame leave him disillusioned, he arrives back only to realize too late the value of what he left behind. BETWEEN SWEET AND SALT WATER was restored by Éléphant: The Memory of Quebec Cinema. DIR/SCR Michel Brault; SCR Denys Arcand, Marcel Dubé, Gérald Godin, Claude Jutra; PROD Pierre Patry. Canada, 1967, b&w, 85 min. In French with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Michel Brault's career as a director and cinematographer spanned more than five decades, in which he pioneered the handheld camera techniques taken up by the exponents of Cinéma vérité and Direct Cinema. After working as chief camera operator on Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin's canonical CHRONICLE OF A SUMMER (1960), Brault continued to direct documentaries and work as cinematographer, before turning to fiction with his narrative debut BETWEEN SWEET AND SALT WATER (1967). Among his other films as director are LES ORDRES (1974), which was awarded the prize for Best Director at the 1975 Cannes Film Festival, and his final feature, THE LONG WINTER (1999).

"An important film that carries within it the seeds of the 'pollination' of fiction by real life." – Gilles Marsolais

Judy Holliday won the 1950 Best Actress Academy Award® for her brilliant and hilarious performance as Billie Dawn, the "dumb blonde" girlfriend of Harry Brock (Broderick Crawford), a corrupt millionaire junk dealer. Brock, a man with social ambitions and a willingness to do anything to fulfill them, is embarrassed by Billie's crass behavior and lack of social sophistication. So he arranges for her to take a crash course in culture from a handsome, young journalist (William Holden). Billie blossoms under his kind tutelage and becomes increasingly aware of her role as a pawn in Brock's crooked business deals. Tensions mount with Brock when Billie suddenly refuses to cooperate in his scheme in this screen classic with unforgettable performances. (Note courtesy of Sony Pictures Releasing.) DIR George Cukor; SCR Albert Mannheimer, from a play by Garson Kanin; PROD S. Sylvan Simon. U.S., 1950, b&w, 103 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Madness...madness." Burma, 1943: ordered by Japanese prison camp commandant Sessue Hayakawa to construct a bridge, British POW Colonel Alec Guinness at first refuses but then acquiesces, reasoning that the undertaking will provide a morale boost for his men. But in his obsession with detail and pride in his work, Guinness loses sight of the fact that the bridge will serve a deadly purpose — the transport of Japanese munitions. It falls to American escapee William Holden and British Major Jack Hawkins to lead a mission back to the camp to destroy Guinness' folly. A powerful portrait of war and madness, and winner of seven Oscars® including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor for Guinness. DIR David Lean; SCR Carl Foreman, Michael Wilson, from the Pierre Boulle novel "Le pont de la rivière Kwaï"; PROD Sam Spiegel. UK/U.S., 1957, color, 161 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This exciting war film details the heroism of the U.S. Navy fliers who fought during the Korean War. Lieutenant Harry Brubaker (William Holden), a naval reserve officer, reluctantly leaves his wife (Grace Kelly) and children behind after he's called back into service. Soon Brubaker receives his orders: to bomb five bridges that are of vital importance to the enemy. Despite his unhappiness at being back in action and his doubts about U.S. soldiers risking their lives on such a dangerous mission, Lieutenant Brubaker puts his life on the line to make sure the effort is a success. Directed by Mark Robson (EARTHQUAKE, VALLEY OF THE DOLLS) and starring, in addition to Holden and Kelly, Fredric March and Mickey Rooney, THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI is a standout film, based on the thrilling novel by James A. Michener. (Note courtesy of Paramount Pictures.) DIR Mark Robson; SCR Valentine Davies, from the novel by James A. Michener; PROD William Perlberg, George Seaton. U.S., 1954, color, 102 mins. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

When Valerie Walker — portrayed in a towering performance by Sheila McCarthy (I'VE HEARD THE MERMAIDS SINGING) — returns from prison after serving her sentence for killing her neighbor in an apparent drunk-driving accident, she wants nothing more than to move on, reconnect with her daughters and reconstruct her life. When the deceased man's son Mark shows up at her door, however, it becomes clear that the past will not easily be forgotten. Despite being given Valerie's version of the tragic events, Mark wants to push further into what he believes really happened, whatever the consequences. An austere and tautly constructed psychological drama, as well as a thoughtful exploration of the challenges of both surviving and living with the many-sided after effects of trauma, CARDINALS is an assured directorial debut for Grayson Moore and Aidan Shipley. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Grayson Moore; DIR Aidan Shipley; PROD Marianna Margaret, Kristy Neville. Canada, 2017, color, 84 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Grayson Moore studied film production at Ryerson University in Toronto. His short films include RUNNING SEASON (2014) and BOXING (2015), which he co-directed with Aidan Shipley.

Aidan Shipley is a Toronto-based filmmaker. After acting in Atom Egoyan's THE CAPTIVE (2014), he went on to study directing at Ryerson University. His shorts include DORSAL (2014) and BOXING (2015). CARDINALS is Moore's and Shipley's feature debut.

"From its opening scenes, CARDINALS sets a standard of no-holds-barred storytelling." – Cinemascope

We've teamed up with our friends at Alley Cat Allies to bring 2017's pawesome CatVideoFest reel to the big screen once again! Curated by filmmaker Will Braden (HENRI, LE CHAT NOIR) from the crème de la crème of popular favorites, classics and new, undiscovered cat videos, the 2017 reel features an array of kitties with cat-titude attacking boxes, lounging, falling, surprising, yawning and generally being adorable. Come see some sweet cat antics on the big screen, meet your fellow feline fanatics and learn more about how to help cats in DC and beyond, from our partners at Alley Cat Allies. Total program: 69 min.

Fitting for a film that is ultimately about free will and individuality, this is Stanley Kubrick's most idiosyncratic work, an exceedingly artful evocation of a dystopian future and a hugely influential cult classic that remains challenging, rite-of-passage viewing for adventurous film lovers. Malcolm McDowell, in his signature role, is creepily charismatic as Alex, the Beethoven-loving ringleader of "the Droogs," a band of young thugs on the prowl for "a little of the old ultra-violence." When Alex is jailed for murder and then subjected to an extreme behavior modification treatment that results in law-abiding conformity, he goes from ruthless predator to hapless victim; his case now taken up by the press, the erstwhile public enemy becomes a cause célèbre. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick, from the novel by Anthony Burgess. UK, 1971, color, 136 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"It's not just a game anymore." The classic murder-mystery board game provides a surprisingly effective springboard for this antic, zinger-filled comedy. When their dinner party host turns up dead, the guests of the late Mr. Boddy are trapped at his country mansion by their mutual suspicion and, as it turns out, abundant and shared motives for killing him. Hardworking butler Tim Curry leads the investigation with reluctant — and memorably comic — help from Madeline Kahn, Christopher Lloyd, Lesley Ann Warren, Michael McKean and more. Directed by Jonathan Lynn (MY COUSIN VINNY, YES MINISTER). DIR/SCR Jonathan Lynn; SCR John Landis; PROD Debra Hill. U.S., 1985, color, 94 min. RATED PG

George Clooney's directorial debut — enhanced by the talented writing of Charlie Kaufman and an all-star cast featuring Drew Barrymore, Julia Roberts and Sam Rockwell — is a brilliant spy comedy based on Chuck Barris' bestselling autobiography. Barris (Rockwell) is an energetic young NBC page who aspires to work in television, but is lured into becoming a CIA operative by a shady agent named Jim Byrd (Clooney). While Barris gains notoriety as a dynamic television producer — creating such innovative and popular shows as "The Newlywed Game" and the self-hosted "The Gong Show" — he is also regularly executing assassinations for the United States government. As ratings rise, his life begins to spiral out of control as he finds himself marked for death by another operative. (Note adapted from Miramax Studios.) DIR George Clooney; SCR Charlie Kaufman, from the book by Chuck Barris; PROD Andrew Lazar. U.S./Germany/Canada, 2002, color, 113 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Alcoholic has-been actor Frank Elgin (Bing Crosby) is given one last chance to make a comeback — and save his relationship with his frustrated wife Georgie (Grace Kelly) — when Broadway director Bernie Dodd (William Holden) offers him a starring role in a new musical. Based on the stage play by Clifford Odets, director George Seaton's deeply moving adaptation is driven by the powerful performances of its three leads and garnered seven Academy Award® nominations and an Oscar® for Kelly. The film was remade in 1982 with Dick Van Dyke and Faye Dunaway. (Note courtesy of Paramount Pictures.) DIR George Seaton; SCR George Seaton, from the play by Clifford Odets; PROD William Perlberg, George Seaton. U.S., 1954, b&w, 104 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

When a military plane crashes in Evans City, Pennsylvania, a mysterious toxin seeps into the water supply, turning the small-town residents into big-time killers. The biological weapon, codenamed "Trixie," leaves its victims either dead or psychologically deranged. Vietnam vet David and his pregnant wife Judy must escape the military-enforced quarantine, the crazed townsfolk and a band of rednecks to get to safety. Five years after NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, George Romero crafted another powerful allegory about government cover-ups and conspiracies in the shadow of Watergate and several high-profile environmental disasters. DIR/SCR George Romero; SCR Paul McCollough; PROD A. C. Croft. U.S., 1973, color, 103 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Local TV legend Count Gore De Vol (Dick Dyszel) returns to present another terrifying film with interactive games, prizes and more! Jack Arnold's iconic 3D creature feature introduced the fearsome "Gill Man," an amphibious humanoid discovered in a remote tributary of the Amazon river by a team of international scientists led by Antonio Moreno and Richard Carlson. The team lands this spectacular discovery on their boat, only to see him overpower his puny captors and make off with his own prized catch — Carlson's shapely fiancée Julie Adams! A late entry in Universal's classic monster lineup, the film has had an outsized influence over the years, including impressing a young Guillermo del Toro with its eerily beautiful underwater scenes; the future filmmaker's ambiguous reading of the amphibian's intentions inspired the Oscar®-winning THE SHAPE OF WATER. DIR Jack Arnold; SCR Harry Essex, Arthur A. Ross; PROD William Alland. U.S., 1954, b&w, 79 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

Director George Romero and writer Stephen King joined forces to create this wonderfully entertaining anthology of dark comic stories, each a virtuoso exercise in the ghouls-and-gags style of classic '50s horror comics. A murdered man emerges from the grave for Father's Day cake. A meteor's ooze makes everything ... grow. A professor selects his wife as a snack for a crated creature. A scheming husband plants two lovers up to their necks in terror. A malevolent millionaire with entomophobia becomes the prey of a cockroach army. Add the spirited performances of a fine cast (Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau, Leslie Nielsen, Ted Danson, E.G. Marshall and King himself) to the ghoulish makeup wizardry of Tom Savini and let the Creepshow begin. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR George A. Romero; SCR Stephen King; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein, U.S., 1982, color, 120 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[VISKNINGAR OCH ROP]
Amid the blood-red backgrounds of a turn-of-the-century mansion, Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Thulin keep a death-watch over spinster sister Harriet Andersson. Flashbacks tell of disappointed lives, meaningless marriages and sisterly conflicts — with a final, bittersweet image suggesting what has been lost. Oscar®-nominated for Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and Costumes, it won for Sven Nykvist's lush cinematography. "A self-portrait (in composite) of the great beloved of my childhood." – Ingmar Bergman. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1972, color, 91 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[LES ROIS MONGOLS]
Luc Picard's engaging family drama is set in Montreal in 1970 during a historical period known as the "October Crisis," as the radical left-wing nationalist group "Front de libération du Québec" (FLQ) has forced the province into a state of emergency with kidnappings, bombings and assassination. This means very little to 12-year-old Manon, though, because she is watching a more immediate crisis happening in her own family. With her father dying of cancer and her depressive mother unable to cope, Manon and her younger brother Michel are set to be sent to separate foster families. Manon, however, has sworn to her brother that she will never leave him alone. In desperation, she hatches a daring plan. Inspired by the political fervor in the city, she forms a "revolutionary" group of her own with her older cousins. They plot to kidnap their elderly neighbor and take off to a cabin the country. Struggling to manufacture a normal childhood in very abnormal circumstances, they spend the initial days enjoying their newfound freedom far from the influence of the grown-up world. Meanwhile, that adult world is actively on the hunt for them. Superbly crafted and very moving, the film was a hit at the 2018 Berlin International Film Festival. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Luc Picard; SCR Nicole Bélanger, from her novel; PROD Stéphanie Pages. Canada, 2017, color,102 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Luc Picard began his career as a theater actor in Montreal and became well known to television audiences for his starring role in the series OMERTÀ (1996). He began writing scripts and directing in 2004. His feature film debut L’AUDITION (2004), in which he also played the leading role, screened worldwide at festivals and won several awards. His films BABINE (2008), ÉSIMÉSAC (2012) and 9 LE FILM (2016) have also enjoyed international success.

"With deft direction for his young actors, a feel for gentle comedy and an almost-too-precise eye for period detailing, Picard polishes the film to a fine gleam, enhanced by the control of François Dutil's warm, chocolate, mustard and claret-colored images." – Variety

Having survived the zombie apocalypse, a small group of scientists and military men look for answers in a secure underground bunker in Florida. Convinced they can tame the reanimated, the scientists have focused their domestication efforts on Bub, a zombie-turned-star pupil. But all hell breaks loose, and they are soon forced to fight for their survival. The third chapter in George Romero's zombie series, following NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) and DAWN OF THE DEAD (1978), was a milestone for zombie special effects, with blood and guts at their absolute best, courtesy of makeup gurus Tom Savini and Greg Nicotero (THE WALKING DEAD). DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein. U.S., 1985, color, 96 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

15th Anniversary
INTOLERABLE CRUELTY
Hotshot divorce attorney George Clooney goes gaga for gold-digger Catherine Zeta-Jones, even while successfully representing her husband, Edward Herrmann, in the divorce. Later, handling the prenup for her second marriage to Texas oil magnate Billy Bob Thornton, Clooney is gulled into thinking she's a changed woman — making him the perfect candidate for husband number three. DIR/SCR/PROD Joel Coen, Ethan Coen; SCR Robert Ramsey, Matthew Stone; PROD Brian Grazer. U.S., 2003, color, 100 min. RATED PG-13

Screening with:
10th Anniversary
BURN AFTER READING
"What a clusterf*ck!" The Coens' sardonic send-up of CIA bumbling and Beltway buffoonery hits home hilariously for DC audiences. Recently fired CIA agent John Malkovich intends to get even by writing his "mem-wah." When the disc containing the tell-all falls into the hands of dim-witted gym trainers Brad Pitt and Frances McDormand, they take it for high-level spy stuff and attempt to blackmail Malkovich, setting in motion a series of ever-more-ridiculous — but deadly — intrigues. Playing out at the same time are overlapping love triangles involving serial adulterer U.S. Marshall George Clooney, Malkovich's icy wife, Tilda Swinton and gym manager Richard Jenkins. DIR/SCR/PROD Joel Coen, Ethan Coen. U.S., 2008, color, 96 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Donna Deitch's swooning and sensual first film DESERT HEARTS was groundbreaking upon its 1986 release: a love story about two women, produced and directed by a woman. In the 1959-set film, an adaptation of a beloved novel by Jane Rule, straitlaced East Coast professor Vivian Bell (Helen Shaver) arrives in Reno to file for divorce, but winds up catching the eye of someone new, the younger free spirit Cay (Patricia Charbonneau), touching off a slow seduction that unfolds against the breathtaking desert landscape. With smoldering chemistry between its two leads, an evocative jukebox soundtrack and vivid cinematography by Robert Elswit, DESERT HEARTS beautifully exudes a sense of tender yearning and emotional candor. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/PROD Donna Deitch; SCR Natalie Cooper, from the novel by Jane Rule. U.S., 1985, color, 96 min. RATED R
Restored by The Criterion Collection/Janus Films and UCLA Film & Television Archive in conjunction with Outfest UCLA Legacy Project and Sundance Institute.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[DJÄVULENS ÖGA]
This sophisticated fantasy — the last Ingmar Bergman film to be shot by the great Gunnar Fischer — is an engaging satire on petit-bourgeois morals. The Devil suffers from an inflamed eye, which he informs Don Juan (Jarl Kulle) can only be cured if a young woman's chastity is breached. So the legendary lover ascends from Hell and sets about seducing innocent pastor's daughter Britt-Marie (Bibi Andersson). Bergman's dialogue bubbles with an irony reminiscent of his beloved Molière, and the music of Domenico Scarlatti (performed by Bergman’s fourth wife, Käbi Laretei) underscores the joy that invests much of the film. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1960, b&w, 87 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

THE BLACK CAT (1934)
This classic Edgar Allan Poe adaptation stars horror icons Boris Karloff (FRANKENSTEIN) and Bela Lugosi (DRACULA) in their first cinematic pairing. After a bus crash on a lonely Austrian road, American honeymooners Joan (Jacqueline Wells) and Peter (David Manners) are forced to spend the night at the house of the spectral Hjalmar Poelzig (Karloff), a sinister-looking man who is engaged in an intense feud with mysterious scientist Dr. Werdegast (Bela Lugosi), whom the couple met on the Orient Express. Held captive in the mausoleum against their will, they soon discover that Poelzig is the leader of a Satanic cult and has chosen Joan to be the devil's bride, while Verdegast is there for his own sinister reasons. The couple is then faced with trying to escape amid a horrifying battle of wits. (Note adapted from Universal Studios.) DIR Edgar G. Ulmer; SCR Peter Ruric, Tom Kilpatrick, from the short story by Edgar Allan Poe; PROD Carl Laemmle, Jr. U.S., 1934, b&w, 65 min. NOT RATED

Followed by:
RE-ANIMATOR
H.P. Lovecraft and Lucio Fulci did not team up to make the most amazing gore-sex grotesquerie of 1985 — but thanks to RE-ANIMATOR, they didn't have to. Director Stuart Gordon and producer Brian Yuzna's joint debut feature — this epochal, awe-inspiring amalgam of FRANKENSTEIN, THE BEYOND and REVENGE OF THE NERDS — is where science meets chaos to produce a hyperactive overdose of gruesome insanity. Herbert West (Jeffrey Combs) is a new Miskatonic University student who moonlights as a mad scientist, intent on perfecting a serum that "re-animates" corpses. Soon, everyone wants a piece of the action, including an evil professor and his army of slime-covered deadites. With berserk theatrics, career-defining roles from horror icons Combs and Barbara Crampton and a scene of two adults chasing an undead cat in a basement, RE-ANIMATOR isn't just a masterpiece of the horror genre — it's a masterpiece of life. (Note courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.) DIR/SCR Stuart Gordon; SCR Dennis Paoli, William Norris, from the story "Herbert West, Re-Animator" by H.P. Lovecraft; PROD Brian Yuzna. U.S., 1985, color, 105 min. NOT RATED

No AFI Member passes accepted.

DR. STRANGELOVE or: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB

Stanley Kubrick's classic Cold War satire kicks in when the paranoid Brig. Gen. Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) initiates a pre-emptive nuclear strike, promoted by Gen. Buck Turgidson (George C. Scott), against the Soviet Union because he suspects the communists are poisoning America's water supply, "to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids." Peter Sellers is masterful playing three distinct roles — the U.S. president, a British military man and Dr. Strangelove, the former Nazi genius recruited to work on weapons designs for the Americans. Nominated for four Academy Awards® including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and a Best Actor nod for Sellers. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Terry Southern, Peter George, from George's novel "Red Alert." U.S./UK, 1964, b&w, 96 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman's real-life status as a married couple (at the time) gives a unique frisson to Stanley Kubrick's final film, a chilling meditation on a couple in psychosexual crisis. Kidman's confession of a long-held sexual fantasy drives Cruise into a furtive, obsessive pursuit of extramarital thrills; events take a turn for the bizarre when the no-nonsense Manhattan doctor discovers that people he knows are involved in a dangerous demimonde of secret sex clubs. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Frederic Raphael, from the novel "Traumnovelle" by Arthur Schnitzler. UK/U.S., 1999, color, 159 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[ANSIKTE MOT ANSIKTE]
Liv Ullmann gives a gut-wrenching Academy Award®-nominated performance as Dr. Jenny Isaksson, a psychiatrist on the verge of a breakdown while staying with her grandparents and awaiting the construction of a new house. Jenny's husband (Sven Lindberg) is away attending a conference in the U.S., and she is desperate to alleviate her growing feelings of despondency. But when she begins an affair with fellow doctor Tomas Jacobi (Erland Josephson) as a means of escape, Jenny is gradually besieged by nightmares and visions triggered by haunting memories from the past. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg, Dino De Laurentiis. Sweden/U.S., 1976, color, 176 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Presented as a four-part miniseries for Swedish television, but released theatrically in a much shorter cut, FACE TO FACE will screen in its full-length version.

Ingmar Bergman's valedictory success, a worldwide hit and one of his warmest and most autobiographical works. In the tour-de-force opening, brother and sister Fanny and Alexander celebrate a splendorous Christmas in 1907 Sweden. However, their fate takes a turn for the worse when their theater-manager father dies and their mother remarries a stern bishop. Escape from his household leads them, by an indirect path, into the life of their secret friend Erland Josephson, an old Jewish antique dealer whose life still has room for the mysticism and magic of an earlier time. "A rich tapestry of childhood memories and moods, fears and fancy, employing all the manners and means of the best of cinematic theatricality from high and low comedy to darkest tragedy." – Keith Keller, Variety. Six Oscar® nominations, with wins for Best Foreign Film, Cinematography (the great Sven Nykvist), Art Direction and Costume Design. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Jöern Donner. Sweden/France/West Germany, 1983, color, 175 minutes (Part 1) and 150 minutes (Part 2). In English, Swedish, German and Yiddish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Originally presented as a five-hour, six-part miniseries for Swedish television, but released internationally in a much shorter theatrical cut, FANNY AND ALEXANDER will screen at the AFI Silver in its original full-length version, presented in two parts.

FANNY AND ALEXANDER [FANNY OCH ALEXANDER] Part 1
Sat, Sept 1, 1:05 p.m.

FANNY AND ALEXANDER [FANNY OCH ALEXANDER] Part 2
Sun, Sept 2, 1:05 p.m.

Ingmar Bergman's valedictory success, a worldwide hit and one of his warmest and most autobiographical works. In the tour-de-force opening, brother and sister Fanny and Alexander celebrate a splendorous Christmas in 1907 Sweden. However, their fate takes a turn for the worse when their theater-manager father dies and their mother remarries a stern bishop. Escape from his household leads them, by an indirect path, into the life of their secret friend Erland Josephson, an old Jewish antique dealer whose life still has room for the mysticism and magic of an earlier time. "A rich tapestry of childhood memories and moods, fears and fancy, employing all the manners and means of the best of cinematic theatricality from high and low comedy to darkest tragedy." – Keith Keller, Variety. Six Oscar® nominations, with wins for Best Foreign Film, Cinematography (the great Sven Nykvist), Art Direction and Costume Design. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Jöern Donner. Sweden/France/West Germany, 1983, color, 175 minutes (Part 1) and 150 minutes (Part 2). In English, Swedish, German and Yiddish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Originally presented as a five-hour, six-part miniseries for Swedish television, but released internationally in a much shorter theatrical cut, FANNY AND ALEXANDER will screen at the AFI Silver in its original full-length version, presented in two parts.

FANNY AND ALEXANDER [FANNY OCH ALEXANDER] Part 1
Sat, Sept 1, 1:05 p.m.

FANNY AND ALEXANDER [FANNY OCH ALEXANDER] Part 2
Sun, Sept 2, 1:05 p.m.

Wes Anderson made an impressive foray into stop-motion animation with this affectionate adaptation of Roald Dahl's beloved children's book. Mr. and Mrs. Fox (voiced by George Clooney and Meryl Streep) live a respectable life in one of the better neighborhoods in the forest. But years of quiet domesticity prove too much for Mr. Fox's wild animal instincts; soon, he slips back into his old ways as a thief, endangering his family and the whole animal community. Featuring the voice talents of Anderson mainstays Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray and Owen Wilson, plus Willem Dafoe and Pulp's Jarvis Cocker. DIR/SCR/PROD Wes Anderson; SCR Noah Baumbach, from the novel by Roald Dahl; PROD Allison Abbate, Jeremy Dawson, Scott Rudin. U.S., 2009, color, 87 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

This variation on the SUNSET BOULEVARD theme is a cautionary fable on the folly of trying to recapture the past rather than a nostalgic return. Aging producer William Holden plans the comeback of Fedora, a reclusive, mysterious and seemingly ageless Golden Age actress. Driven to show Hollywood he has one more picture in him, Holden courts disaster. DIR/PROD Billy Wilder; SCR Billy Wilder, I. A. L. Diamond. France/West Germany, 1978, color, 114 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

It's rare a person would give up fame and fortune to toil in obscurity for someone else's creative vision. Yet, that's exactly what Leon Vitali did after his acclaimed performance as Lord Bullingdon in Stanley Kubrick's BARRY LYNDON. The young actor surrendered his thriving career to become Kubrick's loyal, right-hand man. For more than two decades, Leon played a crucial role behind the scenes, helping Kubrick make and maintain his legendary body of work. The complex, interdependent relationship between Vitali and Kubrick was founded on devotion, sacrifice and the grueling, joyful reality of the creative process. By entering their unique world, we come to understand how the mundane gives rise to the magnificent as timeless cinema is brought to life at its most practical and profound level. (Note courtesy of Kino Lorber.) DIR/PROD Tony Zierra; PROD Elizabeth Yoffe. U.S., 2017, color, 94 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Made during his self-imposed exile in Germany, Ingmar Bergman's FROM THE LIFE OF THE MARIONETTES offers a lacerating portrait of a troubled marriage, and a complex psychological analysis of a murder. Unhappily married businessman Peter (Robert Atzorn) nurses fantasies of murdering his wife, Katarina (Christine Buchegger), until a prostitute becomes his surrogate prey. In the aftermath of the crime, Peter and Katarina's psychiatrist and others attempt to explain its roots. This compelling film moves seamlessly between dream and everyday reality, between lurid color and austere black and white, and the acting by the German cast is superb. (Note courtesy of Janus Films.) DIR/SCR/PROD Ingmar Bergman; PROD Helmut Rasp, Horst Wendlandt. West Germany/Sweden, 1981, color, 104 min. In German with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"What is your major malfunction, numbnuts?" is one of the more printable epithets hurled by Marine sergeant R. Lee Ermey at new recruits (i.e., "maggots") Matthew Modine, Arliss Howard and main whipping boy Vincent D'Onofrio in Stanley Kubrick's impressively intense exploration of soldiering and warfare, their nightmarish realities and psychological toll. After the harrowing experience of boot camp, Modine and company exchange one hell for another when they see action in Vietnam (improbably recreated in the English countryside by the travel-averse Kubrick). DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Michael Herr, Gustav Hasford, from his novel "The Short-Timers." U.S., 1987, color, 116 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams star as Max and Annie, a couple whose weekly game night gets kicked up a notch when Max's charismatic brother, Brooks (Kyle Chandler), arranges a murder mystery party, complete with fake thugs and faux federal agents. So, when Brooks gets kidnapped, it's all part of the game – right? But as the six uber-competitive gamers set out to solve the case and win, they begin to discover that neither this game — nor Brooks — are what they seem to be. Over the course of one chaotic night, the friends find themselves increasingly in over their heads as each twist leads to another unexpected turn. With no rules, no points and no idea who all the players are, this could turn out to be the most fun they've ever had... or game over. (Note courtesy of Warner Bros Pictures.) DIR John Francis Daley, Jonathan Goldstein; SCR Mark Perez; PROD John Davis, Jason Bateman, John Fox, James Garavente. U.S., 2018, color, 100 min. RATED R

"When there's something strange in the neighborhood, who you gonna call?" Released in 1984, GHOSTBUSTERS became a record-setting box office smash, a summer movie benchmark that established the template for how to blend special effects with comedy to create imaginatively escapist adventure. In a fortuitous convergence of then-red-hot comic talent, director/producer Ivan Reitman sure-handedly guides actors/authors Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd's script, a winning vehicle for top-billed Bill Murray, while supporting players Sigourney Weaver, Ernie Hudson, Annie Potts and Rick Moranis contribute memorable moments of hilarity. DIR/PROD Ivan Reitman; SCR Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis. U.S., 1984, color, 105 min. RATED PG

Nominated for six Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, Best Director (George Clooney) and Best Actor (David Strathairn), GOOD NIGHT, AND GOOD LUCK chronicles the historical conflict between television newsman Edward R. Murrow (Strathairn) and Senator Joseph McCarthy during the early days of broadcast journalism in 1950s America. With a desire to report the facts and enlighten the public via his CBS show SEE IT NOW, Murrow and his dedicated staff — headed by his producer Fred Friendly (Clooney) and correspondent Joe Wershba (Robert Downey, Jr.) — defy corporate and sponsorship pressures to examine the lies and scaremongering tactics perpetrated by McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee during his communist "witch-hunts." In this climate of fear and reprisal, the CBS crew carries on, and their tenacity proves historic and monumental. (Note adapted from Warner Bros.) DIR/SCR George Clooney; SCR/PROD Grant Heslov. U.S./France/UK/Japan, 2005, b&w, 93 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Your chills will be multiplyin' — the beloved high school romance of good girl Sandy (Olivia Newton-John) and bad boy Danny (John Travolta) returns in an interactive sing-along edition, with animated subtitles. This Labor Day weekend, enjoy the last of your "Summer Nights" before heading back to school, and become hopelessly devoted all over again… DIR Randal Kleiser; SCR Bronte Woodard, Allan Carr, from the musical by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey; PROD Allan Carr, Robert Stigwood. U.S., 1978, color, 110 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

Guy Maddin and cadre of collaborators Galen and Evan Johnson made this ode to VERTIGO and the city of San Francisco for the closing night, world premiere gala of the 2017 San Francisco International Film Festival. Using Bay Area-based footage from hundreds of sources — studio classics, '50s noir, documentary and experimental films, and '70s primetime TV — and employing Maddin's mastery of assemblage technique, seen in work like MY WINNIPEG (2007) and BRAND UPON THE BRAIN! (2006), the result exerts the inexorable pull of Hitchcock's twisted tale of erotic obsession while paying tribute to the City by the Bay and the ways it looks and feels through the medium of cinema. Composed by Jacob Garchik and performed by Kronos Quartet, the film's score nods to Bernard Herrmann's classic VERTIGO music as it collides and converses with Maddin and the Johnsons' irreverent, loving footage to create a distinctive musical extravaganza. (Note courtesy of Balcony Releasing.) DIR Guy Maddin, Evan Johnson, Galen Johnson. U.S., 2017, color, 63 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Guy Maddin is one of Canada's most adventurous auteurs, with a filmography of more than 12 features and numerous shorts. His credits include the Emmy® Award-winning ballet film DRACULA: PAGES FROM A VIRGIN'S DIARY (2002); THE SADDEST MUSIC IN THE WORLD (2003); MY WINNIPEG (2007); and National Society of Film Critics Best Experimental Film Prize winners ARCHANGEL (1990) and THE HEART OF THE WORLD (2000). Maddin was Visiting Lecturer on Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University, 2015-2016, and is a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Manitoba.

Evan Johnson is Winnipeg-based writer and filmmaker. He studied film and philosophy at the University of Manitoba and worked at Winnipeg's Rug Doctor chemical bottling plant before being discovered by Guy Maddin. He co-directed his first feature, THE FORBIDDEN ROOM (2015), with Guy Maddin.

Galen Johnson worked for several years in the architecture industry before working as production designer, title designer and composer on Guy Maddin's THE FORBIDDEN ROOM (2015). He has since co-directed BRING ME THE HEAD OF TIM HORTON (2015) and the experimental short film SÉANCES (2016).

"First and foremost, THE GREEN FOG is a marvel of film scholarship that looks backward and forward from the Hitchcock masterpiece." – The New York Times

In this landmark noir, a psychotic loner (Richard Basehart) uses his genius for electronics to commit robberies while evading the police. When he graduates to murder, L.A.'s finest, including tough Scott Brady and methodical Jack Webb (who was immediately inspired to create DRAGNET), pull out a few modern techniques of their own. The cops launch an all-out manhunt to snare the clever crook, tracking him through — and beneath — cityscapes stunningly photographed by the greatest of all noir cinematographers, John Alton. Directed by Alfred L. Werker (SHOCK), with uncredited assistance from Anthony Mann (RAW DEAL, T-MEN). "Basehart is excellent as the strange, lone wolf electronics expert/killer, an enigmatic threat haunting the paranoid dreams of the witch-hunting era." – Time Out (UK). (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR Alfred L. Werker; SCR John C. Higgins, Crane Wilbur; PROD Bryan Foy, Robert Kane. U.S., 1948, b&w, 79 min. NOT RATED
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive and The Film Foundation, with funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[HOCHELAGA, TERRE DES ÂMES]
The latest from internationally acclaimed director François Girard (THIRTY TWO SHORT FILMS ABOUT GLENN GOULD, THE RED VIOLIN), HOCHELAGA, LAND OF SOULS is a mesmerizing time-travel drama spanning eight centuries of layered indigenous, colonial and contemporary histories. When a sinkhole suddenly opens up on the field of a downtown Montreal football stadium during a game, the city's past and present begin to intersect. As part of the investigation of the event, an archaeological dig is set up on the site, believed to have been at one time the Iroquois village of Hochelaga. Uncovering artifacts and clues to Montreal's extraordinary past, Baptiste Asigny, a young archaeologist of Mohawk heritage, embarks on an incredible journey of discovery through the tangled history of his at-once-modern and ancient city. Girard's film moves seamlessly between pre-European times and the age of the French explorer Jacques Cartier and his first contact with the Iroquois people, as well as the subsequent convulsive political and social events that occurred in this very space over the centuries, right up to Asigny's own contemporary Montreal. It is an imaginative cinematic weave, a stunning tapestry of time and space, memory and identity. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Francois Girard; PROD Roger Frappier. Canada, 2017, color, 100 min. In English, French, Mohawk and Algonquin with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

François Girard's remarkable career has spanned video art, television, contemporary dance, music and cinema, and has yielded such diverse works as LE DORTOIR (1991), Peter Gabriel's SECRET WORLD LIVE (1994) and BACH CELLO SUITE #2: THE SOUND OF CARCERI (1997). His feature films include THIRTY TWO SHORT FILMS ABOUT GLENN GOULD (1993), THE RED VIOLIN (1998), SILK (2007) and BOYCHOIR (2014). Girard has also directed operas at international venues, including most recently his critically acclaimed "Parsifal" in New York.

"HOCHELAGA, LAND OF SOULS proves a worthy return to the strengths and ambitions of THIRTY TWO SHORT FILMS ABOUT GLENN GOULD and THE RED VIOLIN. Like those two earlier art-house successes, HOCHELAGA...rewards with a rich cinematic banquet." – Variety

John Ford's only attempt at tackling the subject of the Civil War, is based on Grierson's Raid, part of the Union's assault on Vicksburg in April 1863. After several failed efforts at taking the Southern stronghold, Union leaders assign Col. John Marlowe (John Wayne), a railroad designer in civilian life, to lead a cavalry detachment to destroy a vital railroad hub at Newton Station, far behind Confederate lines. Marlowe's unit includes Major Kendall (William Holden), a cynical physician disgusted by the notion that there's glory in the carnage, and the politically ambitious Colonel Secord (Willis Bouchey). Marlowe temporarily appropriates the plantation of Southerner Hannah Hunter (Constance Towers) while in transit and is forced to take her along, in lieu of killing her, after she overhears his plans for Newton Station. As their journey continues, Marlowe realizes that he is much more interested in Hannah than in her political sympathies. Wayne and Holden give gritty, soulful performances, and William Clothier's photography is outstanding in a film that delves beneath simplistic notions of heroism to reveal something more complicated, grisly, and real. (Note courtesy of Park Circus.) DIR John Ford; SCR/ PROD Martin Rackin and John Lee Mahin. U.S., 1959, color, 120 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[VARGTIMMEN]
Holed up together in a tiny cabin on a remote island, sensitive artist Max von Sydow recounts stories from his past to pregnant wife Liv Ullman. As the stories become increasingly lurid, Ullmann begins to wonder if these are real memories or nightmares. And whether the strange people von Sydow claims to have met on the other side of the island, a baron and his family, really exist, or are just his hallucinations. But then Ullmann meets the baron... Gothic horror meets modern psychodrama in this unnerving and underrated masterpiece. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1968, b&w, 90 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Originally made for television and based on Ingmar Bergman's 1994 play of the same name, IN THE PRESENCE OF A CLOWN features a recurring Bergman character — uncle Carl Åkerblom, engineer and Schubert fan — with Börje Ahlstedt returning to the role for the fourth time, following FANNY AND ALEXANDER, THE BEST INTENTIONS and SUNDAY'S CHILDREN. The year is 1925 and 54-year-old inventor Carl Åkerblom has been locked in the psychiatric ward of Akademiska Hospital in Uppsala for the attempted murder of his fiancée (Marie Richardson). Intrigued by the idea of inventing a new performance style to replace silent movies, Carl and a fellow patient, professor Osvald Vogler (Erland Josephson), set up a film project: a "living talkie" entitled THE JOY OF THE JOYOUS GIRL. To demonstrate the magic of their idea, the pair set off with a troupe of actors to perform in a remote provincial village, where the audience includes Carl's stepmother, and emotional confrontations soon come to the surface. (Note adapted from the Ingmar Bergman Foundation.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Pia Ehrnvall, Måns Reuterswärd. Sweden/Denmark/Norway/Italy/Germany, 1997, color, 119 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Yes, you read that right — we're inviting you to bring your four-legged furry friends to see Wes Anderson's latest stop-motion-animated masterpiece on the big screen! ISLE OF DOGS tells the story of Atari Kobayashi (Koyu Rankin), the 12-year-old ward of corrupt Mayor Kobayashi (Kunichi Nomura). When, by executive decree, all the canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast garbage-dump, Atari sets off alone in a miniature Junior-Turbo Prop and flies to Trash Island in search of his bodyguard-dog, Spots (Liev Schreiber). There, with the assistance of a pack of newly-found mongrel friends, he begins an epic journey that will decide the fate and future of the entire prefecture. Also starring F. Murray Abraham, Bob Balaban, Bud Cort, Bryan Cranston, Greta Gerwig, Jeff Goldblum, Akira Ito, Scarlett Johansson, Harvey Keitel, Frances McDormand, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Yoko Ono, Tilda Swinton, Akira Takayama, Ken Watanabe and Frank Wood. (Note courtesy of Fox Searchlight.) DIR/SCR/PROD Wes Anderson; SCR Roman Coppola, Kunichi Nomura, Jason Schwartzman; PROD Jeremy Dawson, Steven Rales, Scott Rudin. UK/Germany, 2018, color, 101 min. RATED PG-13

Co-presented with Montgomery Parks Foundation and Josiah Henson Park Museum and Education Center

Josiah Henson (1789–1883) spent 41 years enslaved. He was a dynamic, driven and principled man who overcame incredible odds to escape his masters and improve the lives of hundreds of freed people throughout his long life. Though immortalized by Harriet Beecher Stowe in her seminal, society-changing novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and catapulted to international fame in 1852, his real story has been largely lost to history. Until now. Through interviews with leading experts and Henson's descendants, the film traces Henson's harrowing journey from slavery in Maryland and Kentucky to freedom in Canada. This is an unmissable documentary that restores a hero of the abolitionist movement to his rightful place in history. DIR/SCR/PROD Jared Brock. U.S., 2018, color, 40 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

When young Alan Parrish discovers a mysterious board game, he doesn't realize its unimaginable powers, until he is magically transported before the startled eyes of his friend, Sarah, into the untamed jungles of Jumanji! There he remains for 26 years until he is freed from the game's spell by two unsuspecting children. Now a grown man (and played by Robin Williams), Alan reunites with Sarah (Bonnie Hunt) and together with Judy (Kirsten Dunst) and Peter (Bradley Pierce) tries to outwit the game's powerful forces. This classic family adventure is an enchanting mixture of comedy, magic and thrills. (Note courtesy of Sony Pictures.) DIR Joe Johnston; SCR Jonathan Hensleigh, Chris Van Allsburg, Jim Strain; PROD Scott Kroopf, William Teitler. U.S., 1995, color, 104 min. RATED PG

Ex-con hard case Sterling Hayden assembles a crew of colorful lowlifes to pull off a daring daytime racetrack heist. Poor judgment, bad luck and a faithless wife conspire to undo their big score, and as things fall apart, this time-fractured puzzle of a story comes together. The screenplay was co-written by Stanley Kubrick and pulp great Jim Thompson; the sharp cinematography is by Lucien Ballard. DIR/SCR Stanley Kubrick; SCR Jim Thompson, from the novel "Clean Break" by Lionel White; PROD James B. Harris. U.S., 1956, b&w, 85 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

George Romero enjoyed the greatest artistic freedom of his career while creating this modern-day Arthurian saga starring Ed Harris and laced with motorbikes, popular rock tunes and a contemporary take on chivalry. The story of a traveling Renaissance-fair troupe led by the idealistic Billy (Harris), KNIGHTRIDERS shows the scope of Romero's artistic talent outside of the horror genre. The group jousts on motorcycles and lives according to a modified version of The Knights Code of Chivalry, but when internal conflicts emerge within the group, Billy must face a breakaway faction led by his greatest rival (special-effects guru Tom Savini) and his band of "black knights." Called by many reviewers a personal film for Romero, KNIGHTRIDERS is both a metaphorical exploration of the director's own path in the entertainment industry and an unusual mishmash of fantasy fiction and drama. The film also features a brief cameo by Stephen King and his wife Tabitha. DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein. U.S., 1981, color, 146 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

George Romero's big return to the genre he invented is set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland inhabited by the walking dead and a small number of the living trying to lead "normal lives" in a fortified city. Ultra-rich despots dwell luxuriously in the high-rise buildings, while common folk survive on the streets. When zombies learn to communicate and evolve to develop a military strategy, a group of mercenaries must save the city — and the remaining dregs of the human race — from a violent end. As with his previous entries in the zombie genre, Romero mixes the gore and thrill of the undead with a not-so-subtle social critique. The top-notch cast includes Simon Baker, Dennis Hopper, Asia Argento, Robert Joy and John Leguizamo. DIR/SCR George Romero; PROD Mark Canton, Bernie Goldmann, Peter Grunwald. Canada/France/U.S., 2006, b&w/color, 93 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[LA PETITE FILLE QUI AIME TROP LES ALLUMETTES]
Based on Quebec author Gaétan Soucy's critically acclaimed novel, Simon Lavoie's stylish, black-and-white coming-of-age film charts the disintegration of a strange and haunted family in a remote, rural region of Quebec in the 1930s. This gothic noir psychodrama unfolds within the troubled, isolated and motherless Soisson family. The solitary alcoholic Soisson patriarch drinks every night and delivers intense, perplexing sermons to his teenage son and daughter in a ramshackle chapel in their house. He also forbids them any contact with the outside world. After his sudden death, however, the children have to fend for themselves and, as the outside world begins to encroach, they begin to doubt their father's teachings, soon uncovering disturbing family secrets. Revolving principally around the daughter (enigmatically named "Brother by Son"), LITTLE GIRL's unique, claustrophobic drama explores the tensions between sexuality and religion, tradition and modernity, while examining the dark, murky consequences of repression. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Simon Lavoie, from the novel by Gaétan Soucy; PROD Marcel Giroux. Canada, 2017, b&w, 112 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Simon Lavoie's films include the award-winning short A WHITE CHAPEL (2005) and the feature films THE DESERTER (2008) and THE TORRENT (2012). He also co-directed, with Mathieu Denis, LAURENTIE (2012) and THOSE WHO MAKE REVOLUTION HALFWAY ONLY DIG THEIR OWN GRAVES (2016). THE LITTLE GIRL WHO WAS TOO FOND OF MATCHES is his most recent feature film.

"Shot in artful black-and-white... this is art-house fare that's challenging but also rewarding." – The Hollywood Reporter

"How did they ever make a movie of 'Lolita?'" was the clever advertising copy for Stanley Kubrick's controversial adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's enduringly scandalous classic. The answer includes an Oscar®-nominated screenplay by Nabokov himself (although it bears only a slight resemblance to the film Kubrick made) and tweaking Lolita's (a precocious Sue Lyon) age to 14 (12 in the book); plus expert performances by Shelley Winters as her comically deluded mother Charlotte and the ever-urbane James Mason as Humbert Humbert, whose mild manner and charming erudition mask the most unruly of passions. Keep an eye out for Peter Sellers as Humbert's romantic rival Clare Quilty, lurking about early and often in a variety of disguises. DIR Stanley Kubrick; SCR Vladimir Nabokov, from his novel; PROD James B. Harris. U.S./UK, 1962, b&w, 153 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

WHAT'S UP, DOC? (1950); LONG-HAIRED HARE (1949); SHOW BIZ BUGS (1957); KNIGHTY KNIGHT BUGS (1958); WATER, WATER EVERY HARE (1952); WHAT'S OPERA, DOC? (1957). Run time: approx. 42 min.

DOG POUNDED (1954), HOME TWEET HOME (1950), TWEETY AND THE BEANSTALK (1957), BIRDS ANONYMOUS (1957), TWEETY'S S.O.S. (1951), FEED THE KITTY (1952). Run time: approx. 41 min.

STUPOR DUCK (1956), A STAR IS BORED (1956), THE DUCKSTERS (1950), ROBIN HOOD DAFFY (1958), MOUSE WRECKERS (1948), DUCK DODGERS IN THE 24 1/2TH CENTURY (1953). Run time: approx. 42 min.

THE STUPOR SALESMAN (1948), YOU WERE NEVER DUCKIER (1948), THE SCARLET PUMPERNICKEL (1950), BOOBS IN THE WOODS (1950), DRIP-ALONG DAFFY (1951), BACK ALLEY OPROAR (1948). Run time: approx. 44 min.

ROMAN LEGION-HARE (1955), HIPPETY HOPPER (1949), BULLY FOR BUGS (1953), DAFFY DUCK HUNT (1949), DOUGH FOR THE DO-DO (1949), LITTLE RED RIDING RABBIT (1944). Run time: approx. 43 min.

RABBIT'S KIN (1952), ZOOM AND BORED (1957), BUNKER HILL BUNNY (1950), HEAVEN SCENT (1956), THE BIG SNOOZE (1946), RABBIT SEASONING (1952). Run time: approx. 43 min.

[THE BITTER STEMS]
This brilliant noir was lauded in its native country upon release, winning Argentina's Silver Condor Award as the best film of the year, yet it remains unknown in the rest of the world. This is a crime, because LOS TALLOS AMARGOS is one of the best noir-drenched crime films of the 1950s — maybe ever. A deep-seated inferiority complex leads a Buenos Aires newspaper reporter (Carlos Cores) into a seemingly innocent correspondence-school scam with a clever Hungarian expat (Vassili Lambrinos). As the money flows in, so do rising suspicions about the Hungarian's true motives. One man is driven to commit the perfect crime — with stunning and tragic results. Lauded by American Cinematographer as #49 of the "50 Best Photographed Films of All Time" (by cinematographer Ricardo Younis) and featuring an inventive score by Astor Piazzolla, the greatest Argentine musician of the 20th century. (Note courtesy of Noir City.) DIR Fernando Ayala; SCR Sergio Leonardo, from the novel by Adolfo Jasca. Argentina, 1956, b&w, 88 min. In Spanish with English subtitles. NOT RATED
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by Film Noir Foundation

AFI Member passes accepted.

THE LOST MOMENT
It's ironic that the film version of "The Aspern Papers" by the 19th-century American author Henry James, revered for his naturalism, should be the zenith of Hollywood gothic. In James' story — modeled after the tale of Edward Augustus Silsbee, who attempted to pilfer letters written by Percy Shelley from Mary Shelley's aged stepsister — a nameless American scoundrel bent on a publishing coup tracks the centenarian Juliana Bordereau to a decaying Venetian palazzo. In THE LOST MOMENT, the scoundrel is an unscrupulous New York publisher (Robert Cummings), who plots to acquire Jeffrey Ashton's love letters to his withered muse (Agnes Moorehead) even if it requires wooing the tedious great-niece, Miss Tina (Susan Hayward). Miss Tina, starchy and lackluster by day, enters a fugue state by night. In thrall to Ashton's letters which she pores over in secret, Miss Tina literally lets down her hair and becomes the luminous Juliana of 1814, throbbing with vitality and yearning for love. (Note adapted from UCLA Film & Television Archive.) DIR Martin Gabel; SCR Leonardo Bercovici, from the novel "The Aspern Papers" by Henry James; PROD Walter Wanger. U.S., 1947, b&w, 89 min. NOT RATED
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute

Preceded by:
MOODS OF THE SEA
Subjectivity informs Slavko Vorkapich and John Hoffman's MOODS OF THE SEA, a lyrical documentary utilizing Felix Mendelssohn's "Fingal's Cave" as musical accompaniment. Opening with a view from a cave onto the ocean, the film orchestrates images of a powerful natural environment: giant waves breaking on the shore, cliffs towering above the surf, a gull flying overhead, otters playing in the waves, clouds gathering, the sun setting on the horizon. True to Vorkapich's interest in montage, the images from the constantly moving camera are cut precisely to the music, and each sequence reaches a rhythmic crescendo with the melody, emphasizing the subjective nature of the camera's point of view. (Note courtesy of UCLA Film & Television Archive.) DIR/SCR/PROD Slavko Vorkapich, John Hoffman. U.S., 1941, b&w, 10 min. NOT RATED
Restored from the 35mm nitrate picture and track negatives by UCLA Film & Television Archive. Funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute.

AFI Member passes accepted.

[TROLLFLÖJTEN]
Considered by many the greatest film version of an opera, Ingmar Bergman pays loving tribute to Mozart's exquisite work, while adding some Bergmanesque touches. He had hoped to film the opera on the historic stage of Drottningholm Palace in Stockholm, but when the location proved unworkable, he recreated the theater's stage and trappings in a studio at the Swedish Film Institute. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; SCR Emanuel Schikaneder; PROD Måns Reuterswärd. Sweden, 1975, color, 135 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

a.k.a. THE FACE [ANSIKTET]
Ingmar Bergman deftly blends the eerie with the comedic in this philosophical battle of wits. In 19th-century Sweden, mesmerist Max von Sydow leads a troupe of traveling mountebanks, "Vogler's Magnetic Health Theater," that include his wife Ingrid Thulin, disguised as his male assistant; his witchy old grandmother Naima Wifstrand, purveyor of potions; coachman Lars Ekborg, skilled at getting out of town quickly; and show barker Åke Fridell, a silver-tongued persuader. Detained in a small town by suspicious police, they are ordered to give a command performance for the local authorities, eager to expose them as fakes. Instead, von Sydow comes up with his greatest trick yet. 1959 Special Jury Prize, Venice Film Festival. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1958, b&w, 101 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This unusual take on the teen vampire genre is a textured and eerie horror yarn about Martin (Romero regular John Amplas, in his screen debut), a young misfit with a taste for blood whose uncle (Lincoln Maazel) believes him to be a vampire — possibly correctly. When the troubled, lonely teen arrives to live with his uncle in Braddock, Pennsylvania, the old man has filled the house with mirrors, garlic and crucifixes to protect him from an alleged vampiric family curse. These and other genre tropes appear to satirize superstition, while MARTIN also offers an in-depth character study of an unbalanced young man. Operating on a low budget and shooting entirely on-location, George Romero managed to create a thought-provoking coming-of-age horror, which he often referred to as his favorite work. MARTIN also marked the first collaboration between Romero and legendary special-effects artist Tom Savini. DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Richard P. Rubinstein. U.S., 1978, color, 95 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Thoughtful and self-assured, Mary (Aya Cash) is an intelligent and compassionate substance abuse counselor. The trouble is, she has a serious drinking problem that she struggles mightily to conceal. She's also got a tangled family history and her romantic life is, well, not very romantic at all these days. After getting charged for drunk driving and subsequently leaving her job, Mary finds herself alone and adrift. Returning to her hometown of Niagara Falls in order to attempt to rebuild her shattered life, she instead discovers that her estranged father is dying of cancer and that she has a teenage half-sister she's never met. Needless to say, these are not the best of times for Mary. Or are they? With its finely calibrated blend of humor and pathos, Molly McGlynn's semi-autobiographical first feature is a surprising, insightful exploration of addiction, sisterhood and the possibilities of redemption. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Molly McGlynn; PROD Matt Code. Canada, 2017, color, 86 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Molly McGlynn is a Montreal-born filmmaker who was raised in New Jersey. A graduate of the Writer's Lab at the Canadian Film Centre in Toronto, her short films include I AM NOT A WEIRD PERSON (2012), SHOES (2013) and 3-WAY (NOT CALLING) (2016). MARY GOES ROUND is her debut feature.

"MARY GOES ROUND handles its story beats with a canny mixture of rueful humor, warmth and realism." – Variety

Mina Shum's new film is the touching, amusing and finely observed tale of Maria (Cheng Pei-Pei), an Asian-Canadian grandmother who arrives at her own declaration of personal independence after discovering that her longstanding husband may not be as worthy of her reverential treatment as she once believed. A dedicated homebody utterly devoted to her husband, Maria's life is tossed into disarray when she finds another woman's underwear in amongst her husband's clothes. Her initial shock, sadness and fear propel her life in unexpected directions involving her daughter (Sandra Oh), her neighbor (Don McKellar) and the world beyond the confines of her own home. Facing her fears, Maria soon discovers that these new life directions just might make things better. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR/PROD Mina Shum; PROD Stephen Hegyes, Raymond Massey. Canada, 2017, color, 94 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Mina Shum is a Hong Kong-born, Vancouver-raised filmmaker who studied theater and film production at the University of British Columbia. Her impressive career includes the award-winning films ME, MOM AND MONA (1993); DOUBLE HAPPINESS (1994); DRIVE, SHE SAID (1997); LONG LIFE, HAPPINESS AND PROSPERITY (2002); and THE NINTH FLOOR (2015).

"Shum mines her favorite theme — immigrant experience in Canada — in what seems at first to be a gentle slice of life but eventually develops a powerful emotional force." – Now Magazine

In 2016, Canadian rock group Metric traversed the globe on the most significant tour of their career. This feature-length concert documentary captures their last live show in Vancouver, British Columbia, the culmination of a year's work on the part of the band and their dedicated crew. Their performance was recorded by 26 cameras and finished in 4K (aka ultra HD), with audio mixed by multi-Grammy winner David Bottrill. Featuring fan favorites from more than five albums, including indelible hits "Breathing Underwater," "Gold Guns Girls" and "Help I'm Alive," and plenty of arena-worthy moments, DREAMS SO REAL is a stunning recreation of an incredibly special evening. (Note adapted from Media Goes HERE.) DIR/PROD T. Edward Martin, Jeff Rogers; SCR Emily Haines; PROD Yen Nguyen. Canada, 2017, color, 110 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Saskatchewan and Ontario-based filmmakers T. Edward Martin and Jeff Rogers have shot hundreds of concerts, live sessions, and documentaries around the world. They are partners in the film company Media Goes HERE, an independent digital studio responsible for films such as THE TENORS UNDER ONE SKY (2015) and the upcoming documentary SOCIABLE. Martin and Rogers shot DREAMS SO REAL with 26 cameras and then took over 18 months to edit the footage together into a single story. The pair are currently researching a new documentary entitled WORDS AND MUSIC, an in-depth look at songwriters and their side of the music industry.

Nominated for seven Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, Best Actor (George Clooney) and Best Supporting Actor (Tom Wilkinson), MICHAEL CLAYTON also earned Tilda Swinton an Oscar® for Best Supporting Actress. The film's eponymous central character (Clooney) is a New York Attorney whose expertise as a "fixer" makes him the go-to guy when his powerful law firm wants a mess swept under the rug. But when the firm's top litigator in a $3-billion case goes from advocate to whistleblower, Clayton is presented with a crisis he may not be able to fix. Clayton is backed into a career corner with little room to fight free; the more he tries to undo the damage, the more he's up against forces that place corporate survival over human life — including his own. DIR/SCR Tony Gilroy; PROD Jennifer Fox, Kerry Orent, Sydney Pollack, Steve Samuels. U.S., 2007, color, 119 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Arrive early (7:30) for a pre-show MOANA-inspired performance by D.C. Hula Girls!

Three thousand years ago, the greatest sailors in the world voyaged across the vast Pacific, discovering the many islands of Oceania. But then, for a millennium, their voyages stopped — and no one knows exactly why. Disney's animated adventure MOANA tells the story of a courageous teenager who sails out on a daring mission to save her people. During her journey, Moana (Auli'i Cravalho) meets the mighty demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson), who guides her in her quest to become a master wayfinder. Together, they sail across the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous monsters and impossible odds, and along the way, Moana fulfills the ancient quest of her ancestors and discovers the one thing she's always sought: her own identity. Directed by the renowned filmmaking team of Ron Clements and John Musker (ALADDIN, THE LITTLE MERMAID, THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG), and featuring music by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mark Mancina and Opetaia Foa'i. (Note courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures.) DIR Ron Clements, John Musker, Don Hall, Chris Williams; SCR Jared Bush; PROD Osnat Shurer. U.S., 2016, color, 107 min. RATED PG

Now considered the first shot in the fight against the film community's antiquated self-censorship system, THE MOON IS BLUE helped propel director Otto Preminger to household-name status. Preminger wouldn't remove forbidden words — virgin, pregnant, seduce — from this light romantic comedy with William Holden, David Niven and Maggie McNamara. It was Preminger's first film as an independent producer, based on the play he'd directed on stage. "I am not a crusader," said Otto Preminger of his refusal to make the edits required for a Production Seal, "but it gives me great pleasure to fight for my rights." DIR/PROD Otto Preminger; SCR F. Hugh Herbert, from his play. U.S., 1953, b&w, 99 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!" When Howard Beale (Peter Finch), a veteran news anchor with slipping ratings, is informed that he is being let go, he launches into a rant on live television, ultimately proclaiming his intention to commit suicide live on his next broadcast. The network's executives cynically decide to keep Beale on and exploit the ratings boost following his rant. Sidney Lumet's prescient examination of the modern news media depicts a cruel, ratings-hungry world, in which populism is exploited for profit. A touchstone film of the 1970s, NETWORK earned 10 Oscar® nominations, including acting wins for Finch, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight, and for Paddy Chayefsky's screenplay. DIR Sidney Lumet; SCR Paddy Chayefsky; PROD Howard Gottfried. U.S., 1976, color, 121 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

George Clooney mugs and charms his way through the Depression-era South, escaping from a chain gang with fellow cons John Turturro and Tim Blake Nelson, and circuitously making his way back to wife Holly Hunter in a winking parody of Homer's "The Odyssey." Along the way, Clooney and company pull a bank job with "Baby Face" Nelson (Michael Badalucco), encounter backwoods magic, escape one-eyed Bible-selling maniac John Goodman, break up a Ku Klux Klan rally in high style and cut a hit single as the Soggy Bottom Boys. The smash-hit bluegrass and country soundtrack won a Grammy for producer T-Bone Burnett. DIR/SCR/PROD Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, based on "The Odyssey" by Homer. UK/France/U.S., 2000, color, 107 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

"So exuberant that it threatens at moments to bounce right off the screen." – TIME. "New York, New York," sing sailors Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra and Jules Munshin on shore leave in the celebrated opening sequence. The trio cavorts from the Brooklyn Navy Yard up to the Bronx, down to the Battery and everywhere in between. This film is a location-shot, whirlwind tour of the city that revolutionized the movie musical. The memorable music is by Leonard Bernstein and Roger Edens. DIR Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen; SCR Betty Comden, Adolph Green; PROD Arthur Freed. U.S., 1949, color, 98 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"I coulda been a contenduh," agonizes ex-boxer Marlon Brando as he gets mixed up in corruption and murder in a Hoboken longshoreman's union, thanks to his brother, mob mouthpiece Rod Steiger. When he's forced to face his victim's sister, Eva Marie Saint (in her first film role), Brando incarnates a new American film archetype, the sensitive man of few words. His minimalist dialogue scenes with Saint arguably top even the legendary cab confrontation with Steiger. "If there is a better performance by a man in the history of film in America, I don't know what it is," said director Elia Kazan. Eight Oscar® wins, including Best Picture, Director, Actor, Supporting Actress, Screenplay and Cinematography, plus an Oscar®-nominated score by Leonard Bernstein. DIR Elia Kazan; SCR Budd Schulberg; PROD Sam Spiegel. U.S., 1954, b&w, 108 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

A "lost" film noir, OPEN SECRET teeters between gritty murder mystery and exposé of social injustice. John Ireland and his new bride, Jane Randolph, arrive as houseguests of an old army buddy only to have him turn up missing. As the newlyweds investigate their friend's disappearance, they realize that he and his town are hiding deep-rooted prejudices. Unlike GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT and CROSSFIRE (both released one year earlier), the "open secret" is never mentioned except in a brief shot of the word "Jew" scribbled on a storefront. When their friend is found dead, Ireland and Randolph are themselves thrust into harm's way by accidental possession of evidence that can convict leading townspeople of not only discrimination, but murder. (Note adapted from UCLA Film & Television Archive.) DIR John Reinhardt; SCR Henry Blankfort, Max Wilk; PROD Frank Satenstein. U.S., 1948, b&w, 68 min. NOT RATED
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute

AFI Member passes accepted.

Screenwriter Richard Benson (William Holden) has three days to finish his movie. But to meet his deadline, he needs the help and imagination of his captivating secretary Gabrielle Simpson (Audrey Hepburn). Together they write and revise a romance/mystery as they envision themselves in the lead roles. The suspense builds as each page pulls the writing team, and their alter egos, closer and closer. Will love imitate art before the final scene fades to black? Cameo appearances by Hollywood legends Marlene Dietrich, Mell Ferrer and Tony Curtis add to the charm of this delightful romantic comedy. (Note courtesy of Paramount Pictures.) DIR Richard Quine; SCR George Axelrod, from a story by Julien Duvivier and Henri Jeanson; PROD George Axelrod, Richard Quine. U.S., 1964, color, 110 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

[EN PASSION]
With its postmodern collage (compared to PERSONA's focused high modernism), this film enjoys cult status as one of Ingmar Bergman's unique and most experimental works. On the island of Fårö, reclusive Max von Sydow becomes involved with high-strung widow Liv Ullmann and cynical couple Bibi Andersson and Erland Josephson. The foursome trade barbs and innuendos at a drunken dinner party. Bergman periodically intercuts the narrative with direct-to-the-camera interviews of the actors discussing their characters, creating a meditation on identity and its dramatic representation. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1969, color, 101 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

One of Stanley Kubrick's finest films, an expert realization of WWI's battles in the trenches and a biting critique of the futility of the soldiers' efforts and the fecklessness of their officers. Ordered to storm a German stronghold that holds little strategic value, French colonel Kirk Douglas' troops take heavy losses and retreat under fire. With the top brass demanding blood — while covering up their own misdeeds and vainglorious motives — Douglas must defend his men's actions in military court. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Calder Willingham, Jim Thompson, from the novel by Humphrey Cobb; PROD Kirk Douglas, James B. Harris. U.S., 1957, b&w, 88 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

This landmark film, startling and provocative in its ideas, stands out as the pinnacle of filmmaker Ingmar Bergman's career. Nurse Bibi Andersson's cheery efforts to communicate with actress Liv Ullmann, mute and semi-catatonic after an onstage nervous breakdown, give way to deeply personal confessions. Andersson's riveting monologue of a long-ago sexual encounter ("one of the rare, truly erotic sequences in movie history," according to Pauline Kael) leads to an even more intense transaction between her and the watchful actress. DIR/SCR/PROD Ingmar Bergman. Sweden, 1966, b&w, 83 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Opening Night of the 13th-Annual Spooky Movie International Film Festival

Underground auteur Don Coscarelli (BUBBA HO-TEP, JOHN DIES AT THE END) launched his career as a purveyor of weird fantasy with 1979's PHANTASM, which spawned a series of sequels, becoming his signature franchise. A death-haunted young boy (A. Michael Baldwin), recently orphaned, notices weird goings-on at a local funeral parlor and discovers a bizarre grave-robbing plot hatched by a visitor from another dimension — a frightening figure known only as "The Tall Man" (Angus Scrimm). DIR/SCR/PROD Don Coscarelli. U.S., 1979/2016, color, 88 min. RATED R

Post-screening book event: sale and signing of Coscarelli's new memoir, "True Indie: Life and Death in Filmmaking."

About "True Indie"
From Don Coscarelli, the celebrated filmmaker behind many cherished cult classics, comes a memoir that's both revealing autobiography and indie-film crash course. Best known for his horror/sci-fi/fantasy films, including PHANTASM, THE BEASTMASTER, BUBBA HO-TEP and JOHN DIES AT THE END, now he's taking you on a white-knuckle ride through the wild world of the independent filmmaker.

Join Coscarelli as he sells his first feature film to Universal Pictures and gets his own office on the studio lot while still a teenager. Travel with him as he chaperones three out-of-control child actors as they barnstorm Japan, almost drowns actress Catherine Keener in her first film role and turns a short story about Elvis Presley battling a four-thousand-year-old Egyptian mummy into a beloved cult classic film.

"True Indie" is loaded with the filmmaker's behind-the-scenes stories, like setting his face on fire during the making of PHANTASM, hearing Bruce Campbell's most important question before agreeing to star in BUBBA HO-TEP and crafting a horror thriller into a franchise phenomenon spanning four decades. Find out how Coscarelli managed to retain creative and financial control of his works in an industry ruled by power-hungry predators, all without going insane or bankrupt. "True Indie" will prove indispensable for film fans, aspiring filmmakers and anyone who loves an underdog success story.

John Ford's only attempt at tackling the subject of the Civil War, is based on Grierson's Raid, part of the Union's assault on Vicksburg in April 1863. After several failed efforts at taking the Southern stronghold, Union leaders assign Col. John Marlowe (John Wayne), a railroad designer in civilian life, to lead a cavalry detachment to destroy a vital railroad hub at Newton Station, far behind Confederate lines. Marlowe's unit includes Major Kendall (William Holden), a cynical physician disgusted by the notion that there's glory in the carnage, and the politically ambitious Colonel Secord (Willis Bouchey). Marlowe temporarily appropriates the plantation of Southerner Hannah Hunter (Constance Towers) while in transit and is forced to take her along, in lieu of killing her, after she overhears his plans for Newton Station. As their journey continues, Marlowe realizes that he is much more interested in Hannah than in her political sympathies. Wayne and Holden give gritty, soulful performances, and William Clothier's photography is outstanding in a film that delves beneath simplistic notions of heroism to reveal something more complicated, grisly, and real. (Note courtesy of Park Circus.) DIR John Ford; SCR/ PROD Martin Rackin and John Lee Mahin. U.S., 1959, color, 120 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Take your stinking paws off me, you damned dirty ape!" So says time-tossed astronaut Charlton Heston to his intelligent ape captors on the mysterious planet where he has crash-landed. Franklin J. Schaffner's enduring sci-fi classic is memorable for the breakthrough makeup effects that transformed Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter and Maurice Evans into ape scientists Cornelius, Zira and Dr. Zaius, earning makeup artist John Chambers an honorary Oscar®. The ace script is credited to THE TWILIGHT ZONE creator Rod Serling and former blacklistee Michael Wilson. The pulse-pounding score is by the great Jerry Goldsmith. DIR Franklin J. Schaffner; SCR Michael Wilson, Rod Serling, from the novel by Pierre Boulle; PROD Arthur P. Jacobs. U.S., 1968, color, 112 min. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.

Long before "The Producers" became a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical sensation, Gene Wilder and Zero Mostel starred in Mel Brooks' original, outrageous, Oscar®-winning farce. Down-on-his-luck theatrical impresario Max Bialystock (Mostel), reduced to romancing wealthy older ladies to fund his decreasingly successful plays, teams up with clever accountant Leo Bloom (Wilder), and together they devise a plan to extract a big payday from a surefire flop: "Springtime for Hitler." Best Original Screenplay Oscar® for Mel Brooks. DIR/SCR Mel Brooks; PROD Sidney Glazier. U.S., 1967, color, 88 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

At the age of 85, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But without a definitive Ginsburg biography, the unique personal journey of this diminutive, quiet warrior's rise to the nation's highest court has been largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans — until now. Featuring interviews with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Jane and James Ginsburg, Clara Spera, Gloria Steinem, Nina Totenberg, Lilly Ledbetter, Sharron Frontiero and Stephen Wiesenfeld, Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik, Bill Clinton, Ted Olson, Judge Harry Edwards, Senator Orrin Hatch, Eugene Scalia, Bryant Johnson and more. RBG is a revelatory documentary exploring Ginsburg's exceptional life and career from Betsy West and Julie Cohen, and co-produced by Storyville Films and CNN Films. DIR/PROD Julie Cohen, Betsy West. U.S., 2018, color, 97 min. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

REEL ROCK 13 delivers jaw-dropping action, soulful journeys and rollicking humor in a brand-new collection of 2018's best climbing films. This year's edition takes viewers on a wild ride from the frigid Antarctic to the bedouin canyonlands of the Middle East. Featuring Madaleine Sorkin, Alex Honnold, Conrad Anker and many more. The full program will be announced in October.
Founded in 2006 by groundbreaking filmmakers Josh Lowell (Big UP Productions) and Peter Mortimer (Sender Films), the REEL ROCK Film Tour brings the best in climbing and adventure films to local audiences in more than 450 locations across the globe, reaching more than 150,000 audience members worldwide. REEL ROCK shows are spirited events where climbers and outdoors enthusiasts come together to celebrate and sample the ultimate in adventure filmmaking.
Run time: approx. 100 minutes, including a 20-minute intermission.

No AFI Member passes accepted.

[RITEN]
This film is a powerfully intense (even by Ingmar Bergman's standards) chamber play on the interaction of critics, the audience and the artist. When actors Ingrid Thulin, Gunnar Björnstrand and Anders Ek are brought in for questioning on an obscenity charge, magistrate Erik Hell subjects them to group and individual interrogations. As a response, the troupe performs their "act" for him, with mortal results. Bergman's first original work for TV was released in theaters abroad. The priest in the confessional is none other than Bergman himself. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman. Sweden, 1969, b&w, 72 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In the documentary ROOM 237, filmmaker Rodney Ascher delves into the symbols and motifs in Stanley Kubrick's classic film THE SHINING, revealing even more secrets hidden within the story more than 30 years later. A filmmaker as rigorously detailed as Kubrick demands close examination, and THE SHINING is a film loaded with oddities that become "curiouser and curiouser" the farther down the rabbit hole you fall. (Note courtesy AFI FEST.) DIR/SCR Rodney Ascher; PROD Tim Kirk. U.S., 2012, color, 102 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Audrey Hepburn sparkles in the title role as the chauffeur’s daughter who pines in anonymity for wealthy playboy William Holden. She’s packed off to Paris to forget her heartbreak and returns a fashionable woman of the world—and Holden takes notice. So too does his responsible brother Humphrey Bogart, who intends for his kid brother to make a good marriage with a wealthy heiress. Running interference, Bogie steps out with Sabrina himself—and into a comic love triangle. DIR/SCR/PROD Billy Wilder; SCR Samuel A. Taylor, Ernest Lehman. U.S., 1954, b&w, 113 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ingmar Bergman's final film is a sequel to SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE (1973), which returns to the characters of Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson) as they meet once more after 30 years without contact. When Marianne decides to visit Johan at his old summer house in the western province of Dalarna, she arrives one beautiful autumn day, waking him with a light kiss. Also living at the summer house are Johan's son Henrik (Börje Ahlstedt) and Henrik's daughter Karin (Julia Dufvenius). Relations between father and son are very strained, but both are protective of Karin. They are all still mourning Anna, Henrik's much-loved wife, who died two years earlier, yet who, in many ways, remains present among them. Marianne soon realizes that things are not all as they should be, and she finds herself unwillingly drawn into a complicated and upsetting power struggle. (Note adapted from Sony Pictures Classics.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Pia Ehrnvall. Sweden/Denmark/Norway/Italy/Finland/Germany/Austria, 2003, color, 107 min. In Swedish, English and German with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP]
When Erland Josephson suddenly leaves his wife Liv Ullmann for another woman, they are forced to confront the disintegration of their marriage. This film, shot in intense, intimate close-ups by master cinematographer Sven Nykvist, chronicles the 10 years of turmoil and love that bind the couple despite their divorce and subsequent marriages. Flawless acting and dialogue portray the brutal pain and uplifting peace that accompany a lifetime of loving. (Note courtesy of The Criterion Collection.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1973, color, 300 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Originally presented as a five-hour, six-part miniseries for Swedish television, but released at nearly half that length for theaters in the U.S., SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE will screen at AFI Silver in its original full-length version, presented in two parts, each running approximately 150 minutes.

SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE [SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP] Part 1
Sat, Aug 11, 2:30 p.m.

SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE [SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP] Part 2
Sun, Aug 12, 2:30 p.m.

[SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP]
When Erland Josephson suddenly leaves his wife Liv Ullmann for another woman, they are forced to confront the disintegration of their marriage. This film, shot in intense, intimate close-ups by master cinematographer Sven Nykvist, chronicles the 10 years of turmoil and love that bind the couple despite their divorce and subsequent marriages. Flawless acting and dialogue portray the brutal pain and uplifting peace that accompany a lifetime of loving. (Note courtesy of The Criterion Collection.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1973, color, 300 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Originally presented as a five-hour, six-part miniseries for Swedish television, but released at nearly half that length for theaters in the U.S., SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE will screen at AFI Silver in its original full-length version, presented in two parts, each running approximately 150 minutes.

SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE [SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP] Part 1
Sat, Aug 11, 2:30 p.m.

SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE [SCENER UR ETT ÄEKTENSKAP] Part 2
Sun, Aug 12, 2:30 p.m.

aka HUNGRY WIVES
Initially described by George Romero as a "feminist film," SEASON OF THE WITCH underwent major cuts before release and ended up being marketed as a softcore porn film entitled HUNGRY WIVES. Following the success of DAWN OF THE DEAD in 1978, the film was again re-cut and re-released as SEASON OF THE WITCH, becoming known as a skillful exploration of the occult. The plot revolves around Joan Mitchell (Jan White), a suburban housewife who goes through an identity crisis after her daughter leaves for college and her husband (Bill Thunhurs) grows violent and alienated. Finding solace in witchcraft, Joan's exploration of supernatural powers leads to a series of sexual encounters and a murder. DIR/SCR George A. Romero; PROD Nancy M. Romero. U.S., 1973, color, 104 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ingmar Bergman's second English-language production follows a week in the life of Abel Rosenberg (David Carradine), an out-of-work American circus acrobat living in poverty-stricken Berlin following Germany's defeat in World War I. When his brother Max commits suicide, Abel seeks refuge in the apartment of professor Vergérus (Heinz Bennent), an old acquaintance. Desperate to make ends meet in the war-ravaged city, Abel and his now-widowed sister-in-law, Manuela (Liv Ullmann), take jobs in Vergérus' clinic, where they discover the horrific truth behind the work of the strangely beneficent professor, and unlock the chilling mystery that drove Max to suicide. (Note adapted from the Ingmar Bergman Foundation.) DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Dino De Laurentiis. U.S./West Germany, 1977, color, 119 min. In English and German with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[SKAMMEN]
Ingmar Bergman's existential study of life during wartime begins like a chamber drama, with husband-and-wife classical musicians Max von Sydow and Liv Ullmann ensconced in a country farmhouse, quietly waiting out the far-off events of an unnamed war. But then the war comes to them, changing everything around them, inside them and between them. As control of their village alternates from one army to the other, von Sydow and Ullmann do what they must simply to survive — with soul-destroying consequences. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. Sweden, 1968, b&w, 103 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Heeeere's Johnny!" Jack Nicholson suffers from one helluva case of writer's block in Stanley Kubrick's acclaimed adaptation of the Stephen King novel. Nicholson's frustrated writer takes a job as the winter caretaker of the isolated Overlook Hotel, with long-suffering wife Shelley Duvall and introverted young son Danny Lloyd in tow. The family tries to make the best of things at the lonely resort, while Nicholson's sanity is pushed to the breaking point as cabin fever and the denizens of the demonic hotel take control. DIR/SCR/PROD Stanley Kubrick; SCR Diane Johnson, from the novel by Stephen King. U.S./UK, 1980, color, 146 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[TYSTNADEN]
The last of the "God and Man" trilogy, this sexually provocative portrait of two women's frayed personalities prefigures Ingmar Bergman's masterpiece PERSONA. Forced to disembark from their train in a foreign country seemingly on the brink of war, sisters Ingrid Thulin and Gunnel Lindblom, along with Lindblom's young son Jörgen Lindström, take residence in the strangely vacant Hotel Europa. Here, the two sisters' tense relationship begins to unravel. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1963, b&w, 96 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Winner of the Grand Jury and FIPRESCI prizes at the 1972 Cannes Film Festival and based on the novel by Polish sci-fi author Stanislaw Lem, SOLARIS is a cerebral, emotive space odyssey about memory, grief and love. When cosmonaut/psychologist Kris Kelvin (Donatas Banionis) is sent to investigate the mysterious death of a doctor onboard a space station orbiting the planet Solaris, he initially believes the remaining crew to have lost their minds. Then, he begins to experience strange apparitions of his own, encountering his seven-years-dead wife (Natalya Bondarchuk) and gradually losing sight of the line between reality and the darkest recesses of his inner psyche. DIR/SCR Andrei Tarkovsky; SCR Fridrikh Gorenshtein, from the novel by Stanislaw Lem; PROD Vyacheslav Tarasov. USSR, 1972, color, 167 min. In Russian with English subtitles. RATED PG

AFI Member passes accepted.

Steven Soderbergh's desire to remake Andrei Tarkovsky's legendary sci-fi film was questioned by some, but the rather pleasing result stands on its own merits. Tighter and decidedly shorter than the two-and-a-half-hour Tarkovsky original, Soderbergh's version features George Clooney as a clinical psychologist who is sent to investigate the crew of an isolated research station orbiting a distant planet, only to be confronted by his deceased wife Natascha McElhone, seemingly now in the peak of health. Crew members Viola Davis and Jeremy Davies are also experiencing unexplained manifestations. DIR/SCR Steven Soderbergh, from the novel by Stanislaw Lem; PROD James Cameron, Jon Landau, Rae Sanchini. U.S., 2002, color, 99 min. RATED PG-13

AFI Member passes accepted.

SORRY TO BOTHER YOU tells the story of Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield, ATLANTA, GET OUT), a 30-something telemarketer with self-esteem issues who discovers a magical selling power hidden within himself. Suddenly, he's rising up the ranks to the elite team of his company, which sells heinous products and services. The upswing in Cassius' career raises red flags with his brilliant girlfriend, Detroit (Tessa Thompson, CREED, DEAR WHITE PEOPLE), a sign-twirling gallery artist. But the unimaginable hits the fan when Cassius meets the company's cocaine-snorting, orgy-hosting, obnoxious and relentless CEO, Steve Lift (Armie Hammer, CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, THE SOCIAL NETWORK). SORRY TO BOTHER YOU is unlike anything you have ever seen. It is a searing social satire about greed, racial dynamics and capitalism in a universe not unlike our own. Prepare yourself for something outrageous and totally original. With Terry Crews, Forest Whitaker, Omari Hardwick and Danny Glover. DIR/SCR Boots Riley; PROD Nina Yang Bongiovi, Jonathan Duffy, Charles D. King, George Rush, Forest Whitaker, Kelly Williams. U.S., 2018, color, 105 min. RATED R

No AFI Member passes accepted.

"I'm Spartacus!" This epic drama follows the legend of Spartacus (Kirk Douglas), who leads his fellow slaves in an uprising against the corrupt Roman Empire. A landmark film for young director Stanley Kubrick, it was one of two films from 1960 (along with Otto Preminger's EXODUS) to openly hire and credit blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, thus effectively ending the blacklist era. Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, Tony Curtis and Jean Simmons round out the film's all-star cast. Nominated for six Academy Awards®, the film won Best Cinematography, Costume Design, Art Direction and Supporting Actor (Ustinov). DIR Stanley Kubrick; SCR Dalton Trumbo, from the novel by Howard Fast; PROD Edward Lewis. U.S., 1960, color, 198 min plus one 15-min intermission. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

William Holden won an Oscar® for his portrayal of a cynical hustler suspected of being a German spy in this POW drama, adapted from a Broadway hit. Into the drama, director Billy Wilder blends his signature comedic touch to show the monotony and angst of prison life. Otto Preminger (despite the fact that he couldn't remember his lines) pulls off a superb performance as the Nazi commandant who puts on his boots to answer the phone. DIR/SCR/PROD Billy Wilder; SCR Edwin Blum. U.S., 1953, b&w, 121 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"I am big! It's the pictures that got small!" Regarded by many as the best film ever made about Hollywood — and by others as audacious treachery. In flashback, recently deceased screenwriter/kept man Joe Gillis (William Holden) narrates his tormented, mutually exploitative affair with has-been star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson). Erich von Stroheim (Desmond's devoted valet in the film, and himself a former star/director familiar with the vicissitudes of Hollywood fame) came up with the memorable idea of having his character write the star's fan mail. Director Billy Wilder rejected his other suggestion: von Stroheim washing and ironing her panties. Nominated for 11 Oscars®, winning three including Best Screenplay. DIR/SCR Billy Wilder; SCR/PROD Charles Brackett; SCR D. M. Marshman, Jr. U.S., 1950, b&w, 110 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

George Clooney won the Academy Award® for Best Supporting Actor for his role as veteran CIA agent Bob Barnes in Stephen Gaghan's (TRAFFIC) whip-smart, multi-narrative action thriller about oil industry corruption. Stretching from Houston to Washington to the Persian Gulf, SYRIANA tracks several disparate characters across the globe as they find their lives impacted by the ruthless competition for incalculable power and wealth that drives the energy industry. The star-studded cast includes Matt Damon, Jeffrey Wright, Chris Cooper, Christopher Plummer, William Hurt and Amanda Peet. DIR/SCR Stephen Gaghan, from the novel by Robert Baer; PROD Jennifer Fox, Georgia Kacandes, Michael Nozik. U.S./United Arab Emirates, 2005, color, 128 min. In English, Urdu, Arabic, Persian, French and Mandarin with English subtitles. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Terrence Malick's poetic adaptation of the Guadalcanal novel by James Jones (who also wrote FROM HERE TO ETERNITY) features a superstar cast, including Sean Penn and Adrien Brody, George Clooney, Nick Nolte, John Cusack, Woody Harrelson and John Travolta. Jim Caviezel stands out as the sensitive Private Witt, whose musings on nature and man's destructive tendencies narrate much of the movie. The entire cast worked for scale or took cameos simply to be involved in a project by the reclusive Malick, returning to filmmaking for the first time after a 20-year hiatus. DIR/SCR Terrence Malick, from the novel by James Jones; PROD Grant Hill, Robert Michael Geisler, John Roberdeau. U.S., 1998, color, 170 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

David O. Russell's acidic action comedy, centered on a gold heist in the waning days of the Gulf War, has only grown in stature since its 1999 release — and the intervening, much longer U.S. incursion into the Gulf that began in 2003. Spring of 1991: Having removed a treasure map from an Iraqi POW in Kuwait, a motley crew of Army personnel — Maj. Archie Gates (George Clooney), Sgt. 1st Class Troy Barlow (Mark Wahlberg), Staff Sgt. Chief Elgin (Ice Cube), and Pvt. 1st Class Conrad Vig (Spike Jonze) — use the momentary disruption of Saddam Hussein's authority to breeze into Iraq and collect a secret stash of gold bullion. But getting out with the gold proves not to be so simple. With Cliff Curtis, Nora Dunn, Judy Greer and Alia Shawkat. DIR/SCR David O. Russell; PROD Paul Junger Witt, Edward L. McDonnell, Charles Roven. U.S., 1999, color, 114 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[SÅSOM I EN SPEGEL]
The first in Ingmar Bergman's "God and Man" trilogy of chamber dramas won the Best Foreign Language Picture Oscar® and was also nominated for its screenplay. During a family's island summer holiday, schizophrenic daughter Harriet Andersson (giving perhaps the greatest single performance in all of Bergman's films) experiences her last moments of good cheer and lucidity before descending into outright madness. Her crumbling is brought on when she discovers her novelist father has used her illness as raw material. DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1961, b&w, 89 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Ingmar Bergman's first English-language feature stars Bibi Andersson as Karin Vergerus, a Swedish housewife trapped in a stable but somewhat unsatisfying marriage to a small-town surgeon (Max von Sydow). When the lively, engaging Jewish-American archaeologist David Kovac (Elliott Gould) enters the picture, Karin gives in to her attraction and begins an affair. But Karin's new relationship turns out to be less fulfilling than she had hoped, and she is torn between staying with David and returning home to her husband and children. (Note adapted from the Ingmar Bergman Foundation.) DIR/SCR/PROD Ingmar Bergman; PROD Lars-Owe Carlberg. U.S./Sweden, 1971, color, 115 min. In English. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

Prosecutor John Conroy (Edmond O’Brien) leads a government probe into a crime syndicate headed by sinister Neil Eichelberger (Ed Begley), but he's hamstrung by pervasive political corruption. Crusading reporter Jerry McKibbon (William Holden) agrees to assist — while he and Conroy vie for the attention of the loyal Amanda Waycross (Alexis Smith). The hard-edged script (based on an unpublished novel by Horace McCoy) is a real-life lift from the Kefauver Committee's exposé of organized crime on the national level. Bunker Hill, Angel's Flight and Olympic Auditorium all accentuate the period realism. Co-starring Tom Tully, Ted de Corsia and Ray Teal. (Note courtesy of the American Cinematheque.) DIR William Dieterle; SCR Warren Duff, from the story by Horace McCoy; PROD Irving Asher. U.S., 1952, b&w, 85 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Winner of the Best Canadian Feature Documentary Award at Hot Docs 2017, UNARMED VERSES follows the precociously talented Francine Valentine, a 12-year-old girl who is, along with her family and community, facing eviction from their low-income housing block in Toronto. Armed with a luminous, undaunted creative spirit and a restless, generous intelligence, Francine turns to artistic expression as she and her friends prepare to record music and poetry together. Meanwhile, as the community struggles to come to terms with the threat to its cultural richness and very real human wealth, the wrecking ball looms and the city's plans for relocation are issued. Charles Officer's documentary is a striking, sensitive and incisive film about the actual human costs of such high-minded notions of progress, development and gentrification. (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Charles Officer; PROD Lea Marin. Canada, 2017, color, 86 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Charles Officer is a Toronto filmmaker, writer and actor who studied at Cambridge University and the Ontario College of Art and Design. His award-winning films include the short SHORT HYMN, SILENT WAR (2002) and his feature debut, NURSE.FIGHTER.BOY (2008), as well as his Emmy® Award-winning documentary debut MIGHTY JEROME (2012). Officer recently completed directing multiple episodes of the dramatic series 21 THUNDER, which premieres internationally on Netflix in 2018.

"A poignant, blossoming 86-minute experience about the power of art." – The Globe and Mail

Returning to the city from her wealthy employer residence, Joyce Willecombe (Nancy Olson), spots two armed men on the train. She reports them to the conductor who radios in to the Station's police. Once at Union station she points out the men to Lt. William Calhoun (William Holden), head of the station's police squad and they find out that the gunmen are members of a gang who have kidnapped her employer's blind daughter and are seeking a $100,000 ransom. The Chicago police headed by inspector Donnelly (Barry Fitzgerald), and the FBI are both called in. The action in this classic film noir culminates in a chase through the station's underground tunnels. (Note courtesy of Paramount Pictures.) DIR Rudolph Maté; SCR Sydney Boehm, from the story by Thomas Walsh; PROD Jules Schermer. U.S., 1950, b&w, 81 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

At once hilarious and serious, smart and sassy, Eisha Marjara's articulate, absorbing and lively gender-shifting comedy is the witty tale of Sid (New York-based actor Debargo Sanyal in a brilliant performance), a transitioning woman whose life takes a surprising turn when a 14-year-old boy named Ralph arrives at her door with the surprising announcement that he is her son. It seems that back in his youth, before Sid's gender identity was clear to him, he and his girlfriend did what young people do; and now the result of that earlier life has sought out his biological father. While Sid is stunned by this news, Ralph meanwhile is as surprised to discover he has a trans "father" as he is intrigued at the sheer coolness of it. Suddenly, Sid must ponder the consequences of this profound news and share it with her Indo-Canadian parents and with Daniel, the love of her life. Just when she thought transitioning was complicated, Sid quickly learns that she ain't seen nothing yet! (Note courtesy of Tom McSorley, Executive Director, Canadian Film Institute.) DIR/SCR Eisha Marjara; PROD Joe Balass. Canada, 2017, color, 95 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

Eisha Marjara is a Montreal-based filmmaker, photographer and novelist. Her earlier films include the satirical THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN (1994), the multiple award-winning feature docudrama DESPERATELY SEEKING HELEN (1999) and the shorts HOUSE FOR SALE (2012) and THE TOURIST (2016). In addition to her film and photography work, Marjara also wrote the critically acclaimed novel, "Faerie" (2016). VENUS is her first fiction feature.

"Heartwarming and an absolute delight to watch, VENUS also presents us with the hopeful notion that if a kid can embrace one's gender identity, anyone can." – Georgia Straight

Sharks! Jets! Ten Oscar® wins, including Best Picture, for the dazzling screen adaptation of Broadway's "Romeo and Juliet"-inspired musical smash, a tale of forbidden love starring Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer. Unforgettable for the brilliant score and lyrics from Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim — with songs including "Maria," "Tonight" and "America" — and Jerome Robbins' vibrant choreography, featuring the Oscar®-winning footwork of George Chakiris and Rita Moreno. DIR/PROD Robert Wise; DIR Jerome Robbins; SCR Ernest Lehman, from the musical by Arthur Laurents and Robbins, music and lyrics by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim. U.S., 1961, color, 153 min plus an intermission. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

In this gritty classic, aging outlaw Pike Bishop (William Holden) prepares to retire after one final robbery. Joined by his gang, which includes Dutch Engstrom (Ernest Borgnine) and brothers Lyle (Warren Oates) and Tector Gorch (Ben Johnson), Bishop discovers the heist is a setup orchestrated in part by his old partner, Deke Thornton (Robert Ryan). As the remaining gang takes refuge in Mexican territory, Thornton trails them, resulting in fierce gunfights with plenty of casualties. Director Sam Peckinpah's THE WILD BUNCH is a powerful tale of hangdog desperados bound by a code of honor that rates as one of the all-time greatest Westerns and perhaps one of the greatest of all films. (Note courtesy of Warner Bros.) DIR Sam Peckinpah; SCR Walon Green, Sam Peckinpah from the story by Walon Green, Roy N. Sickner; PROD Phil Feldman. U.S., 1969, color, 145 min. RATED R

AFI Member passes accepted.

[NATTVARDSGÄSTERNA]
Rural pastor Gunnar Björnstrand battles with his own loss of faith — through the sparsely attended morning services, his failure to comfort a suicidal, counsel-seeking Max von Sydow, his anguished encounter with mistress Ingrid Thulin and finally an evening high mass. The second film in the "God and Man" trilogy features Ingmar Bergman's most direct engagement with theology — implying that any affair of "Man" will necessarily find itself a long way from "God." DIR/SCR Ingmar Bergman; PROD Allan Ekelund. Sweden, 1962, b&w, 81 min. In Swedish with English subtitles. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

"Lions and tigers and bears. Oh my!" When Louis B. Mayer couldn't get Shirley Temple, he took a gamble and cast Judy Garland as Dorothy, the lonely dreamer from Kansas who runs away with her dog Toto and is transported over the rainbow to the magical Land of Oz. The film earned six Oscar® nominations, with wins for Best Score and Best Song ("Over the Rainbow"). DIR Victor Fleming; SCR Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, Edgar Allan Woolf, from "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" by L. Frank Baum; PROD Mervyn LeRoy. U.S., 1939, b&w/color, 101 min. NOT RATED

AFI Member passes accepted.

For more than 30 years, Fred Rogers, an unassuming minister, puppeteer, writer and producer, was beamed daily into homes across America. In his beloved television program, MISTER ROGERS' NEIGHBORHOOD, Rogers and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life's weightiest issues, in a simple, direct fashion. There hadn't been anything like Mr. Rogers on television before and there hasn't been since. Though he may be best known today as a soft-spoken, cardigan-wearing children's television host, in reality, Rogers' career represents a sustained attempt to present a coherent, beneficent view about how we should best speak to children about important matters and how television could be used as a positive force in our society. In WON'T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?, Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (TWENTY FEET FROM STARDOM) looks back on the legacy of Fred Rogers, focusing on his radically kind ideas. While the nation changed around him, Rogers stood firm in his beliefs about the importance of protecting childhood. Neville pays tribute to this legacy with the latest in his series of highly engaging, moving documentary portraits of essential American artists. DIR/SCR/PROD Morgan Neville; PROD Caryn Capotosto, Nicholas Ma. U.S., 2018, color/b&w, 94 min. NOT RATED

No passes accepted.

Celebrating its 50th anniversary, YELLOW SUBMARINE is an icon of psychedelic pop culture, a colorful musical spectacle and an exhilaratingly joyful cinematic experience for all ages — filled with visual invention, optical illusions, wordplay and glorious music. Once upon a time — or maybe twice — there was an unearthly paradise called Pepperland. 80,000 leagues under the sea it lay, a place where beauty, happiness and music reign supreme. But this peaceful harmony is shattered when the Blue Meanies invade with their army of storm bloopers, apple bonkers, snapping turtle turks and the menacing flying glove, to stop the music and drain Pepperland of all color and hope. So it's The Beatles to the rescue, as our animated heroes team up with Young Fred and the Nowhere Man and journey across seven seas to free Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, make peace with the Meanies and restore music, color and love to the world. A landmark in animation, with Heinz Edelmann's inspired art direction conjuring up a nonstop parade of wildly different styles and techniques, YELLOW SUBMARINE was hand-restored in digital 4K, frame by frame. From the paper-doll residents of Pepperland, to the tinted photography of the soot-covered roofs and smokestacks Liverpool, the menagerie of fanciful characters in the Sea of Monsters, the kaleidoscopic color-splashed rotoscoping of "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," the vertigo-inducing op-art of the Sea of Holes and the triumphant euphony of the "It's All Too Much" finale, the film is simply a joy. (Note courtesy of Abramorama.) DIR George Dunning; SCR/PROD Al Brodax; SCR Lee Minoff, Jack Mendelsohn, Erich Segal, from the song by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. UK, 1968, color, 85 min. RATED G

AFI Member passes accepted.